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Advice on Matching surrounds to Fronts

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by bazwall, Dec 24, 2003.

  1. bazwall

    bazwall
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    Hi.
    I have a hi-fi system with Tangent Monitor 9 floorstanders( 15-100w 6 ohms bi-wired) I intend getting a Yamaha 5630 or similar for tv/dvd surround sound.
    Can anyone recommend compatable rears and front.

    I can get a Yamaha package ns100p? from RS for £80 which includes a sub'

    My question is would I be better sound wise, having compatable front and rears but no sub? I do not have a dvd at the moment but I intend to get one as I would like to build up a collection of Music concerts,not that interested in the film side of things

    One other thing I have now moved and my lounge is only 12' x 12'with suspended wooden floors so I get a fair bit of base resonance? Thanks for any help and A Very Happy Xmas to one and all
     
  2. The Hemulen

    The Hemulen
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    If you are mostly interested in music DVD's, concerts etc AND your front speakers are nice and symetrical on either side of the screen then I'd recomend using the receivers 'phantom centre' mode.
    This downmixes the centre channel equally into left and right. For this to work well you need good imaging front speakers and to be seated roughly in line with the screen.
    A simple test to see if this will work is to listen to something like a radio four announcer with the tuner IN MONO. If the voice apears to be coming from 'thin air' between the speakers then you are on to a winner and it will certainly sound better and more coherant than a non matched centre speaker.
    (I recomend using a human voice as it is not surprisingly one of the easiest things for the brain to localise)
     

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