Advice on Eliminating Cable Boxes

MTM5062

Novice Member
In my house I have 14 TVs. They are all hooked up to either a large Verizon DVR box (I have 4) or a small non HD box (10) that is just power, coax in and coax out. I am looking to remove all these boxes and lower my bill. All of these DVR boxes are ran using component video cable with audio (labeled "for surveillance video). I was thinking of removing all the unnecessary component wire and boxes and sending it back to Verizon. This will lower my monthly bill tremendously. I just upgraded to Verizon's G3100 Router/modem and I pay for the highest speeds so speed shouldn't be an issue. I want each of my 14 TVs to be hooked up to a Roku. I already have about 6 Roku sticks, but do I have to buy 8 more Roku's or is there a way this can be done wirelessly from a hub? Any other options you can recommend? I still want to have access to basic 3, 6, and 10 cable. Note: This is how the house was set up when I bought it. It was probably good 15 years ago, but is out of date and not needed. Plus having to pay $150 per month for renting these boxes is insane.
 

Fred Smith

Well-known Member
In my house I have 14 TVs. They are all hooked up to either a large Verizon DVR box (I have 4) or a small non HD box (10) that is just power, coax in and coax out. I am looking to remove all these boxes and lower my bill. All of these DVR boxes are ran using component video cable with audio (labeled "for surveillance video). I was thinking of removing all the unnecessary component wire and boxes and sending it back to Verizon. This will lower my monthly bill tremendously. I just upgraded to Verizon's G3100 Router/modem and I pay for the highest speeds so speed shouldn't be an issue. I want each of my 14 TVs to be hooked up to a Roku. I already have about 6 Roku sticks, but do I have to buy 8 more Roku's or is there a way this can be done wirelessly from a hub? Any other options you can recommend? I still want to have access to basic 3, 6, and 10 cable. Note: This is how the house was set up when I bought it. It was probably good 15 years ago, but is out of date and not needed. Plus having to pay $150 per month for renting these boxes is insane.

This UK based forum and you are very welcome.

However we don't have Verizon cable here, but Virgin instead, so "basic 3, 6, and 10 cable" means nothing. You would be better off asking our American cousins on the AVSforum.
 

MTM5062

Novice Member
Ok thank you. I didn't realize this was UK based. I am sure Virgin is similar to Verizon and 3, 6 and 10 are just the basic channels we get free with a coax cable. I believe they are ABC, CBS, and NBC - they are the 'big 3' and are the major US broadcast companies.
 

chenks

Well-known Member
Ok thank you. I didn't realize this was UK based. I am sure Virgin is similar to Verizon and 3, 6 and 10 are just the basic channels we get free with a coax cable. I believe they are ABC, CBS, and NBC - they are the 'big 3' and are the major US broadcast companies.

No, not similar at all.
Virgin is legally obligated to provide 5 channels for free, but you can only view them on a Virgin box, which you can only have if you are a Virgin customer. It’s a closed system and can only be accessed using their box
 

oneman

Well-known Member
I assume you can receive all the channels you want via streaming services ?

You either have a distribution system with a switch which is possible but you are looking at thousands of dollars so by far the cheapest and easiest option is to get a separate device for each TV.

You can use Roku wirelessly but you might find problems running 14 of them wirelessly especially if you are wishing for 4K resolution at all the screens. It really depends on what your WIFI is like around the property.

So running internet to each TV via cable is a sensible thing to do and I believe you can adapters for the Roku boxes to use wired connection. The problem is the co-ax cable used for the cable boxes is no good for internet, you need to be using Ethernet.

At this point depending on your cabling skills it probably time to call in a good quality contractor and get them to do a survey and quote.
 

Fred Smith

Well-known Member
I assume you can receive all the channels you want via streaming services ?

You either have a distribution system with a switch which is possible but you are looking at thousands of dollars so by far the cheapest and easiest option is to get a separate device for each TV.

You can use Roku wirelessly but you might find problems running 14 of them wirelessly especially if you are wishing for 4K resolution at all the screens. It really depends on what your WIFI is like around the property.

So running internet to each TV via cable is a sensible thing to do and I believe you can adapters for the Roku boxes to use wired connection. The problem is the co-ax cable used for the cable boxes is no good for internet, you need to be using Ethernet.

At this point depending on your cabling skills it probably time to call in a good quality contractor and get them to do a survey and quote.

And this sums up why location appropriate forums are the one's to choose when it comes to TV and broadcast systems, though all are welcome here.

US: ATSC
UK, Europe: DVB-C/S/T

In the UK for a good few years we have had no Ethernet capable Roku's all Wi-Fi only, until late last year when the Streambar was released and earlier this year Express 4K but both require third party adapters. At least Amazon supply at extra cost their own version of an Ethernet adapter. We did briefly recenlty get two Now TV crippled versions of Roku's with Ethernet capabiluity , the Freeview (terrestrial TV) and the 4K box (a version of the Ultra?) but as they had Now TV firmware they had a very limited app store compared to the Roku app store, and are no longer available.

In the US there were / are different Roku models some of which are / were Ethernet compatible i.e. Ultra and Ultra LT without third party add-ons.
 

oneman

Well-known Member
And this sums up why location appropriate forums are the one's to choose when it comes to TV and broadcast systems, though all are welcome here.

US: ATSC
UK, Europe: DVB-C/S/T

In the UK for a good few years we have had no Ethernet capable Roku's all Wi-Fi only, until late last year when the Streambar was released and earlier this year Express 4K but both require third party adapters. At least Amazon supply at extra cost their own version of an Ethernet adapter. We did briefly recenlty get two Now TV crippled versions of Roku's with Ethernet capabiluity , the Freeview (terrestrial TV) and the 4K box (a version of the Ultra?) but as they had Now TV firmware they had a very limited app store compared to the Roku app store, and are no longer available.

In the US there were / are different Roku models some of which are / were Ethernet compatible i.e. Ultra and Ultra LT without third party add-ons.
I'm not talking about the ATSC or DVB-C, what OP asked if they can use their existing cables in any way and the answer is no.

As for Roku, my mistake as I have a ugreen Ethernet to microsoft adapter which works for firestick and chromecast, just read it and realised it doesn't work for Roku stick which I wrongly assumed it would. So either get a Roku model which does support it or get a Firestick or Firecube cube which is probably what I would have used in the first place but I do believe in the US there are few services its missing that are available on Roku.
 

Fred Smith

Well-known Member
I'm not talking about the ATSC or DVB-C, what OP asked if they can use their existing cables in any way and the answer is no.
That information was for the OP not you, as he lives in the USA, just to point out that sometimes there are major technical differences between countries and or continents.

As for Roku, my mistake as I have a ugreen Ethernet to microsoft adapter which works for firestick and chromecast, just read it and realised it doesn't work for Roku stick which I wrongly assumed it would. So either get a Roku model which does support it or get a Firestick or Firecube cube which is probably what I would have used in the first place but I do believe in the US there are few services its missing that are available on Roku.

Roku in the UK recently offered Ethernet connectivity to two recent devices via several third party adapters after years of not doing so.

Roku in the US I understanding offer the same plus models as the UK but localised to suit. Plus there are local models with built in Ethernet, which appear to be similar to the two now defunct Now TV boxes which were localised to suit the UK. Which Roku never released versions of in the UK under their own brand. Now that Sky have stopped selling Now TV branded Roku's, maybe Roku UK will start selling other models over here, who knows what the agreement with Sky was or how long there are clauses?
 

oneman

Well-known Member
That information was for the OP not you, as he lives in the USA, just to point out that sometimes there are major technical differences between countries and or continents.



Roku in the UK recently offered Ethernet connectivity to two recent devices via several third party adapters after years of not doing so.

Roku in the US I understanding offer the same plus models as the UK but localised to suit. Plus there are local models with built in Ethernet, which appear to be similar to the two now defunct Now TV boxes which were localised to suit the UK. Which Roku never released versions of in the UK under their own brand. Now that Sky have stopped selling Now TV branded Roku's, maybe Roku UK will start selling other models over here, who knows what the agreement with Sky was or how long there are clauses?
Don't understand why they don't support the Ethernet dongles, I am sure many people would like to use Ethernet to remove WiFi issues
 

Fred Smith

Well-known Member
Don't understand why they don't support the Ethernet dongles, I am sure many people would like to use Ethernet to remove WiFi issues

Exactly. I have a old Roku 2 with built in Ethernet and Dual Band Wi-Fi so only occasionally use it mainly with Ethernet. I also have two more recent Roku's SS+ with Wi-Fi only but fortunately Dual Band. But most recent UK Roku's have, been 2.4Ghz only with no Ethernet capability. On 5GHz my two SS+'s work OK otherwise I would have had to purchase two recently released Express 4k's and two third party Ethernet adapters as 2.4GHz is extremely overcrowded where I live.
 
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