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Advice Needed - Monitor Calibration Daylight Work Lights

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by rdhir, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. rdhir

    rdhir
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    All,

    I need some advice. I have been taking photos for my wife's website. I take basically torso+ head portraits and fabric swatches. I have a D70/Nikon 85mm 1.4/SB-800.

    I wish to try my hand at proper colour correction now so that the photos are more accurate. I was wondering if anyone here uses monitor calibration (colorimeter + software), and also if anyone else has set up work lighting round their monitor which reflects daylight.

    I do appreciate that this is a bit of a difficult thing as even if I correct the image the other person will have an uncalibrated monitor... but I thought we could at least try.

    So any recommendations advice much appreciated.

    No particular budget but I'll have more and more difficulty justifying £500 and up, certainly at this stage of the business.

    Cheers

    Rajiv
     
  2. kenlynch

    kenlynch
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  3. rdhir

    rdhir
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    Thanks I had just come across this, but your link made me click on it and follow up. Do you use special lighting? I just came across a source for the Solux lights he talks about and they don't seem outrageous at £8 a bulb (4000 hours).

    Cheers

    Rajiv
     
  4. kenlynch

    kenlynch
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    I don't use any special lighting at all. The most important factors are to keep any direct light off your screen and try to keep light conditions as stable and comfortable as possible. The accuracy you get will be more than adequate for the web if you follow the rest of the instructions, and bear in mind that at the end of the day most people are viewing the with un-calibrated monitors.
     
  5. longleyc

    longleyc
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    Ya true, problem is that not everybody`s monitor is correctly calibrated, so its not an equal world in that respect.
    So monitor calibration is usually found in professional design/print output houses where the corrective process can simulate and adjust gamut for the reflective properties of paper/print process etc.

    ColorVision and Pantone ColorPlus (Pantone is a highly used professional colour referencing system) is a prosumer version for home calibration. Its cheap-ish.

    You can software or manually calibrate (if you can get the phosphur values of the monitor). If your monitor is decent and it runs to a spec of a known ICC profile you can use that. However, monitors change over time, phosphor values change, so regular calibration is required.
    Much has been written on this subject as its a science in itself. I would think setting up a constant light source would be a great idea. Sunlight wavelengths change during the course of the day, so you would be negating this effect.

    Consider this: Camera manufacturers offer the Adobe RGB profile colour space within the camera settings. You can then import this into professional software. With a correctly calibrated monitor and thus calibrated output i.e print you are doing the right moves in the whole process.
    You didnt mention the type of OS. I cant comment, as Mac OS is a different beast to the M$ OS in terms of driver for the monitor.
    Most professional print houses use Macs, as theyre designed for publishing. You just wont find any of these using PC`s or not calibrating. Its not an option, if professional standards are required.

    Tho, as you intend to publish to the interweb, most professional software will allow you to optimise the palette for web publication.
    That is, using default web pallette.
     
  6. seany

    seany
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