Advice for dark sounding Pro-Ject Turntable

heavypettying

Novice Member
Hello,

I've recently upgraded my system from to some dali menuet speakers and a (second hand) roksan kandy amp. Streaming music from spotify (highest quality) gives me a good sound. However, I mostly listen to vinyl, and I'm using my old Pro-Ject debut ii turntable. I have noticed when A/B-ing tracks from spotify to turntable that there is a pronounced difference. The Pro-Ject certaily sounds warmer, which I like, but there is a distinct lack of treble and high end. Records sound muddy in comparison. I was hoping for some advice on the issue. It is worth saying that I thought the issue may have been a worn cartridge, so I have just fitted a new ortofon 5e and that hasn't recified the problem.

Is it possible that the mis match between the budget Pro-Ject and more mid range amp / speakers is showing up the limitaions of the turntable?

Maybe now I have a decent amp and speakers, they are actually showing up the limitations in poorly pressed vinyl?

Are there any adjusments I can make to the turntable?

Is it worth considering a new deck? If so, I hear the Rega's come highly recomended?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Paul
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
First, though I'm not there to know for sure, don't mistake difference volume levels for different sound quality. I have a DVD that I use for a CD Player, and it has substantially higher output than my turntable. Ultimately I had to add Attenuators to make the levels the same.

Next, what you are you using for a Phono Equalization Pre-Amp? Does the turntable have a pre-amp built in? Does the Amp have a PHONO Input? Are you sure you are only using ONE Phono Pre-Amp?

Phono Equalization boost the bass and softens the highs, the opposite of what happens when the record is cut. If you have DOUBLE Phono Pre-Amps it is going to be very much out of balance.

Check your Tracking Weight and makes sure it is consistent with the new cartridge. Check the Anti-Skate to make sure it is set properly. Makes sure the turntable is dead level.

Of course, I also can't know the condition of your Vinyl. That's something you will have to evaluate. If the records are excessively worn, that could potentially be an explanation.

Hopefully other will have more ideas.

Steve/bluewizard
 

heavypettying

Novice Member
Thanks for you input on this Steve. I've been testing new records, to try and eliminate poor pressings etc.

I decided to test test the phono stage in the amp. So I plugged the turntable into my NAD phono amp and plugged that into the line in on the amp. Problem solved. Zero muddiness and plenty of clean highs. This must mean that the phono stage on the Roksan amp is either rubbish or broken? Any thoughts?
 

DT79

Well-known Member
Thanks for you input on this Steve. I've been testing new records, to try and eliminate poor pressings etc.

I decided to test test the phono stage in the amp. So I plugged the turntable into my NAD phono amp and plugged that into the line in on the amp. Problem solved. Zero muddiness and plenty of clean highs. This must mean that the phono stage on the Roksan amp is either rubbish or broken? Any thoughts?
Built in phono stages can be pretty variable in quality, and are often just an afterthought, it’s not a surprising result.
 

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