Question Advice about RTX 3080 build

GameDos

Member
Hi, I am currently planning on building my first PC. I plan on using it for gaming (not so much 4K, but ray tracing looks very good) and deep learning (so need high VRAM).

So far, this is what I have in my build (max budget 2k):

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 10 GB Founders Edition Video Card
PSU: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case
Monitor: AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor

And I had a couple of questions:
1) What would be a decent Motherboard to use for this build?
2) How future-proof is it?
3) Any suggestions about something to change?
 

Ono

Well-known Member
My comments are:

You really ought to be going 1440p or 4k with an RTX 3080;
PSU looks a tad underpowered.
MOBO - just pick a decent X550 jobbie.
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
PSU looks a tad underpowered.
Definitely. Remember you won't get 550 watts output to the system at 100% load. A 3080 uses circa 300 watt
 

MooCow

Well-known Member
1) B550 or X570 board - depends on your budget and your need for features - 2.5G lan, Wifi, more M2 slots, USB-C
2) It isn't at all I am afraid, as in you are buying into the end of the motherboard/PSU compatibility right now. This current gen is as far as the socket compatibility has been confirmed by AMD so you are stuck with it. Not saying it's not currently the best option, because it is frankly, but they have made no commitment to provide support for future generations of CPU on any current board.
3) The SSD. The P1 is pretty slow by NVME standards - it's not that much ahead of it's SATA SSD brethren in some scenarios. WD Black, Samsung 970 Pro, amongst others would be contenders.
 

Grangey.

Distinguished Member
Few issues:

PSU is too underpowered
GPU stock for that model is non existent unless you pay scalper prices

also if you need more vram, I’d wait till mid Jan to see if nvidia come out with the ti range which will come with more vram- but will effect your budget.
 

MartinH32

Well-known Member
You'll need a 750w PSU for a 3080 (I'm using a four year old Corsair CX750 on my 3080). You may struggle to find that GPU at the moment. But yeah, at least 2160p or even 4k with that, or if that's not of interest you don't need such a powerful GPU
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
As the monitor is only 1080P, you won't need a 3080 graphics card.
 

GameDos

Member
Few issues:

PSU is too underpowered
GPU stock for that model is non existent unless you pay scalper prices

also if you need more vram, I’d wait till mid Jan to see if nvidia come out with the ti range which will come with more vram- but will effect your budget.
I dont plan on buying now. This is sort of a pre-plan but Ill wait till stocks and prices return to normal. Will wait and see if ti comes out by then
 

beerglass007

Active Member
I have a very close build

Like others said you will 100% need 750watt PSU and 27" 1440P monitor or get a 3060TI and go 1080p
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Definitely. Remember you won't get 550 watts output to the system at 100% load. A 3080 uses circa 300 watt

I agree the power supply looks a bit light but a decent quality power supply should get to the specified level. Not that you want to run it that close. The efficiency of the power supply is dictated by how much power on top it actually pulls from the wall. So a 500w one will pull closer to 600w from the wall.
 

GameDos

Member
I have a very close build

Like others said you will 100% need 750watt PSU and 27" 1440P monitor or get a 3060TI and go 1080p
According to what I read, 3060 ti has 8GB VRAM only. I will wait for January and see if Nvidia comes out with some ti with 10GB VRAM. Everything is out of stock rn anyways XD
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Evidence?

Apologies if it is not you but on a number of threads somebody has posted incorrectly that the efficiency of a PSU dictates how much power it actually provides to the downstream components.

So a 500W PSU and to be clear running at max 500W will deliver 500W to downstream components if that is what is required. If there is only 200W of power drawn then that is all that will be delivered.

What I am stating is incorrect is that some previous posts were saying that a 500W PSU at an average efficiency of say 80% could only ever deliver up to 400W. This is incorrect!

Efficiency varies with load too so depending on how much power your system uses that plays a part to a certain extent in the selection of the PSU. You don't want to buy a massive PSU only to find out it is only 70% efficient in the range you use it.

As for speccing the right size PSU, if the calculator came up with 500W of power usage then that's a minimum. Much like buying a car, we can only go 70mph on the motorway but buying one that just does 70mph would be not practical as it would be inefficient and not have any headroom.

For evidence here is a better put summary, first paragraph

 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
Apologies if it is not you but on a number of threads somebody has posted incorrectly that the efficiency of a PSU dictates how much power it actually provides to the downstream components.

So a 500W PSU and to be clear running at max 500W will deliver 500W to downstream components if that is what is required. If there is only 200W of power drawn then that is all that will be delivered.

What I am stating is incorrect is that some previous posts were saying that a 500W PSU at an average efficiency of say 80% could only ever deliver up to 400W. This is incorrect!

Efficiency varies with load too so depending on how much power your system uses that plays a part to a certain extent in the selection of the PSU. You don't want to buy a massive PSU only to find out it is only 70% efficient in the range you use it.

As for speccing the right size PSU, if the calculator came up with 500W of power usage then that's a minimum. Much like buying a car, we can only go 70mph on the motorway but buying one that just does 70mph would be not practical as it would be inefficient and not have any headroom.

For evidence here is a better put summary, first paragraph

Interesting. Though that is another forum post.
The issue is that if the item is advertised at say, 650 watt, but it draws more than that from the wall surely it should stipulate so on the packaging (something to do with EU legislation).
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Interesting. Though that is another forum post.
The issue is that if the item is advertised at say, 650 watt, but it draws more than that from the wall surely it should stipulate so on the packaging (something to do with EU legislation).

Think about it another way what would be more confusing to the users if they bought a 500W and found it only delivered 400W. Sure EU\Trading standards would have more to say about it that way.

A box that advertises a PSU at 500W only to have a smaller label saying that it is 80% efficient would mean end-users working out what the actual power supply gives out. That's not the case.

The actual labels on PC PSU do not sure how much power they consume just often up to 13Amps, so which particular EU legislation do you refer to?

Another link, 1st paragraph:


A review of a 1000W PSU showing the total power output of 1000W DC side.

 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
A box that advertises a PSU at 500W only to have a smaller label saying that it is 80% efficient would mean end-users working out what the actual power supply gives out. That's not the case.
Most PSU manufacturers put this on the box
The actual labels on PC PSU do not sure how much power they consume just often up to 13Amps, so which particular EU legislation do you refer to?
I'm not sure on the exact legislation but it is to do with energy consumption and being more sustainable. So someone would buy a PSU on the basis it draws 600 watt from the wall, when in fact it could be pulling over 700 watt
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Most PSU manufacturers put this on the box

They put the efficiency on the box yes, because it is now a selling feature. They don't expect the user to have to do the maths.

Simply put a 500W PSU including PC power supplies as advertised will supply that amount of power to the components. It's as these pages suggest a myth to suggest otherwise. The previous example of the 1000W PSU is that downstream the DC side is supplying 1000W

I'm not sure on the exact legislation but it is to do with energy consumption and being more sustainable. So someone would buy a PSU on the basis it draws 600 watt from the wall, when in fact it could be pulling over 700 watt

Yes if it is the components were pulling 600W then it would to draw 700W from the wall if it was ~86% power efficient.


1608119862262.png

Take this label for example 550W but the actual AC input bit is 240V at up to 5A which would be 1,200W. Clearly not the case unless it is <50% efficient.

It would be against Consumer Rights Act to advertise something as supplying 550W if it could only supply 450W for example.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
This is what I was trying to find (there should be loads around), you can see what


8:42 on the video. You can see that 100% load is 500W power out and is taking 630W from the wall.

1608120419395.png
 

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