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Advantages of running video through amp

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by thebrummy_one, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. thebrummy_one

    thebrummy_one
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    Guys,
    I have a TEAC AG-5D AV digital home theater receiver and a JVC DR-M1SLB DVD recorder. I have the DVD plumbed into my telly using the conponant connections at present and connected to the amp via digital coax. What I would like to know is, what are the advantages of using the amps s-video in/outs above connecting directly to the telly? I would have thought that;
    a) The signal would be degraded due to extra connectors.
    b) Conponant over S-video is a superior connection. (Although I have to admit, when trying to distinguish between the two when linked directly, I have difficulty in spotting any :confused: )
    I don't really want to rush out and buy another s-video lead just to find out there is no improvement. (I already have one)
    On another point, What are your thoughts on the TEAC when compared to a Yamaha of similar specs & price? I ask as, last year when I brought it, I had gone to get a Yam, (I can't remember the model now, but I know it was 6.1 as opposed to the 5.1 TEAC) but the nice man in RS talked up the TEAC. I am still wondering why I took his advice after all the reseach I had done to find the amp I wanted, and that was lots :oops:
    Just to complete the picture, I have a set of KEF 2005.2 sub/sats and a Tosh 36ZD26P telly. (nice picture but lousy cabinet underneath!!!)
     
  2. Roohster

    Roohster
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    Component is indeed superior to S-Video...the only advantage of routing through the amp in most cases is convenience - if you have lots of sources the picture gets switched along with the sound.
    Stick with the component connection!
     
  3. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Agree, stick with the component connection. If your DVD player & TV are progressive scan compatible then component is the only connection that will work with PS.

    As for video switching via the amp - its not only for convenience, but in many cercumstances could save money on long leads or just be required due to a lack of inputs on your screen.
    If all your AV grear is a few metres away from the screen sending all video into the receiver and then a single lead to the screen should save a bit of money on additional long leads. Many receivers will upconvert a composite to S-Video to component signal so everything including say a VCR can go to the screen via the component lead.
    Then what if your TV only has 1 component input (like most do!) but you have 2 or more component sources. The receiver does the switching and so you don't need to unplug the leads each time you go from one source to another.

    Mark.
     
  4. thebrummy_one

    thebrummy_one
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    Thanks for that. My TV & DVD do both support PS but in different formats. The telly will only support NTSC prog & the DVD only output PAL (or the other way round!!)
    As all my AV stuff is lumped together, then distance isn't an issue, which is a good thing as the instuction pamphlet states that the source and feed out has to be the same standards (ie. S-video in/S-video out.) so there would be no benefit at all to routing through the amp. The telly has plenty of inputs, so I won't worry about using the amp for pictures. Thanks again as this has set my mind to rest!
     
  5. piersmcg

    piersmcg
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    On a similar note, I want to connect up a set-top digibox (Scart output), a DVD recorder (Scart input, optical/digital/component/A/V composite output), VCR (Scart output) via my Yamaha RXV630
    On this I have the following inputs:
    DVD optical, composite A/V+S-Video for VCR1/DVR, VCR2, DTV, etc
    and outputs:
    composite A/V+S-Video for VCR1/DVR, VCR2, monitor (and component inputs).

    The questions are:
    1. What is the difference (do I need both?) between the yellow video connector and the S-Video lead in the composite connections?
    2. If I connect the DVD recorder optical output to the receiver, I assume I'm fine connecting the phono leads via a converter to the Scart input on this from the VCR1/DVR output
    3. I've seen S-VHS leads as well as S-Video. What's the difference?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  6. Zacabeb

    Zacabeb
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    Well;

    1. In composite video (the yellow connectors), the entire video signal is carried over a single lead. It carries a black-and-white picture "as is", and places color information at at a subcarrier which is then merged with the black-and-white picture. This means that the color is essentially stored in a pattern overlaid on the black-and-white picture, and they must be filtered apart upon reception, leading to artifacts such as cross-color (rainbows in fine patterns) and cross-luminance (fringes around color transitions).

    In S-video, the black-and-white picture and color subcarrier are sent through separate leads, avoiding those artifacts. The color is still limited in bandwidth because of the subcarrier though, which is why color sharpness in S-video is not as good as in component video.

    2. If I understand your plan correctly (connecting sound from the DVR to the amp via digital optical and to the DVR via analog RCA), it should work fine. However, the receiver will not convert from digital to analog, so the sound from a digital input cannot be sent out through the analog output to the DVR.

    3. There is no difference. The correct designation is S-video or Y/C, but as it was introduced with S-VHS (aka Super-VHS) in the late 80's, it's been associated with S-VHS ever since. It's actually incorrect to refer to S-video as S-VHS, but many manufacturers do it anyway.
     
  7. piersmcg

    piersmcg
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    Thanks for your excellent replies! Most helpful to a layman. A glossary somewhere would be a good idea on these forums ...

    A quick query about the digital (optical) output from the DVD though - what does this contain? i.e. is it simply an audio feed, or does it carry video as well? If so, then surely the amp must convert DtoA to transmit the video and audio signal out to the monitor?

    If not, then do I need both connections (digital and analogue) for the DVR to Amp? (I assume I'll get superior audio this way, including encoding etc).
     
  8. Zacabeb

    Zacabeb
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    The digital optical output carries only audio, so you need to connect the video signals as well if you want to use your amp also to switch video between sources. If your DVR is already connected to your display via SCART, I would recommend keeping that connection instead of running the video through the amp.
     

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