Advantages of Leaving the EU

niceguy1966

Distinguished Member
Who said that they’re in favour of the U.K. benefitting from fracking, when they can sell the gas to someone else..
Pro-fracking forum members and several pro-fracking lobby groups that obviously influenced them.
 

BorkenArrow

Member
Why fracking would be bad for the economy...

Lessons from the eighties when North sea oil peaked...

 

gilz

Novice Member
Now that the UK has left the EU (no longer a member) it might be of interest to highlight the perceive advantages of leaving. A trade deal is still under discussion with the EU, noting the cut-off date of 31 December 2020.

The internet is a good source to tap, bearing in mind things are not so simple as the following reasons indicate. Every point has much deeper implications and lots of entanglements which would require about 600 pages. However, here goes:

1. The cessation of net contributions to the EU would allow for some cuts to taxes or increase in government spending.

2. Be able to make all our own laws with no oversight from external courts like the ECJ and Parliament to be supreme. The ultimate legal jurisdiction will be be Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.

3. Be able to control immigration into this country, this in turn leads to greater border security.

4. Be able to strike trade deals with anyone in the world with no ‘interference’ from the EU.

5. Be free of all those really annoying rules and regulations which the EU has imposed on trade in goods and services.

6. Parliament will be sovereign. No external authority will have the right to impose directives. The average UK voter has more effective representation in Westminster than in Brussels.

7. The future direction of EU requires greater integration and so much less national sovereignty. The military forces, police and other security areas might become integrated.

8. The EU's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) uses up over 35% of the EU budget and this goes to less than 5% of the population. Basically French farmers are being funded by British tax-payers.

9. Only 6% of UK businesses export to the EU but all have to abide by EU rules. According to an Institute of Directors survey, half of businesses thought the UK could make a success of Brexit, and 46% thought it would have a positive impact on red tape.

10. Leaving would encourage British firms to manufacture more and rely less on imports, particularly in industries that depend more on quality engineering than the cost of raw materials, such as cars, which currently account for 9.7% of our exports.

11. UK contributions to the EU have helped finance huge Spanish trawlers who have vacuumed up and depleted our waters of fish.

No doubt there are other perceive advantages of leaving the EU, but the above are for starters.

Good luck!
:)
I cannot think of one advantage to nose diving a country that was in great shape, into the ground. Blatant stupidity or some alternate Tory Libertarian agenda to "make hay while the sun" shines, then put all the money you have made into a Tax haven, and watch the poor sods flounder in Post Johson Britain. The middle classes struggling to pay and pay, and employ and employ, whilst food banks and homelessness rise, and the poor are denigrated to their proper place in Bullingham club history.................
 

Agrippa 57

Well-known Member
I cannot think of one advantage to nose diving a country that was in great shape, into the ground. Blatant stupidity or some alternate Tory Libertarian agenda to "make hay while the sun" shines, then put all the money you have made into a Tax haven, and watch the poor sods flounder in Post Johson Britain. The middle classes struggling to pay and pay, and employ and employ, whilst food banks and homelessness rise, and the poor are denigrated to their proper place in Bullingham club history.................
Welcome on board! You'll find lots of agreement here, but dissenting voices are few and far between. Expect either "it's too early to tell" (they've even mostly abandoned that one) or complete silence. The argument, it seems, has been largely conceded by Brexit enthusiasts. Either that or they've flounced or got banned - with a notable exception in @IronGiant, a moderator who has been honest and open enough to state that he voted to leave and now regrets it. Most of the contributors to this and other Brexit - related threads (myself included) will support your sentiments wholeheartedly.
 
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Laureline

Distinguished Member
When the UK left the EU it replicated the EU's tariffs on food imported from third party nations. Many of those tariffs on things like oranges and olives were set high to protect the manufacturers of the same food items produced within the EU.

Johnson announced today that Ann Marie-Trevalyan as International Trade Secretary is now looking at reducing the tariffs on those goods


However, because tariffs are applied to the wholesale goods there's no proof that importers will pass the saving onto consumers, preferring to increase their profits.

Secondly, the UK has a zero tariff agreement with the EU on those goods so unless Trevalyan reduces the tariffs to zero it's unlikely that oranges imported from elsewhere in the world can actually undercut existing EU imported

A third one the article doesn't mention is that the UK still don't have sanitary checks on EU goods and thus goods imported from the EU will still pass through with no checks whereas goods imported from elsewhere may be detained in customs
 

Laureline

Distinguished Member
^^^ In unrelated news..

UK trade performance falls to worst level on record in first quarter​



That's an interesting read, the worst Q1 since records began in 1955. Some of the causes is the obvious increase in the price of oil.

Less obvious is 1% was due to people buying gold and other precious metals. Presumably Oligarchs squirreling their cash out of accounts about to be seized into stuff they can keep with a gold/precious metals broker ??

Also, less currency was traded , more worrying less investment into the country from abroad

Markets are not really interested in trading in GBP at the moment. If you buy a lot of goods/services from a country then it makes sense to keep vast reserves of the currency as it goes quickly and you can hopefully sell it at a higher rate than you paid for it,

But if you're not buying much from the country then the demands for the currency are less and there's a danger your currency will sit untouched on a virtual shelf for long periods of time and no-one thinks it's going to get much higher in the near future so no sense in buying now to make a killing three months later
 

mjn

Distinguished Member

vinba

Well-known Member
I can avoid speeding tickets from abroad! ;)

The problem with that is the vehicle will be flagged in the country the offence took place in.. Even before Britain left the eu it was almost impossible to enforce foreign motoring fines in the UK..
 

bobcar

Well-known Member
The problem with that is the vehicle will be flagged in the country the offence took place in.. Even before Britain left the eu it was almost impossible to enforce foreign motoring fines in the UK..
Yes, that's really worrying.
 

Xenomorph

Member
Who started this thread? No longer with us. But I chuckle reading through those initial points laying out the advantages :)
 

Laureline

Distinguished Member
Who started this thread? No longer with us. But I chuckle reading through those initial points laying out the advantages :)

Looking at the second message, they reply to the original poster and it refers to posts by "Earthrod"

Rich is the third poster and he also addresses "Earthrod"
 

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