Advantages of Leaving the EU

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Well they can, usually very slowly when it comes the the EU.

It does discourage innovation though, when a big market mandates that only 2022 tech can be used when it comes to charging connectors.

Even if you don't think that's a problem, it's pretty crazy that the EU are legislating on what companies can put in their tech (for non-safety reasons).

Isn’t the legislation the other way though, and stating that manufacturers need to move away from legacy connectors?

USB-C is the current primary connector, due to the high bandwidth and dual purpose connection, so enforcing Phone/Laptop manufacturers to adopt it feels like a positive move. It’s also not preventing manufacturers developing improved wireless connectivity.
 

jonmorris

Active Member
Who knows? Tech tends to move on fairly regularly. If the EU had brought the rule in earlier, then we would have been locked in to whatever they thought was the best connector at that time.
Micro USB had become the defacto standard in the phone industry before this (but it wasn't good enough for charging laptops etc), so there's nothing to say USB-C will be with us for life.. but there's plenty of life left in it, and it already has many improvements without needing to change the connector itself.

Anyone proposing a change to the UK (or European) plug? No. It does the job.

USB-C may not last as long, but it certainly will help reduce e-waste - albeit if the industry gets behind a common fast charging protocol (USB-PD being the front runner) rather than having a load of different types.
 

jonmorris

Active Member
I wonder if this is something we could have vetoed prior to leaving

That's always the best bit. If there was something the EU was proposing that we didn't like, we could veto it. Now we can only moan about what 'that evil EU' is doing that will impact us, with no say whatsoever.

Hilarious isn't it! We helped make the laws before and now we can only bitch about it on forums.
 

locallondoner

Well-known Member
That's always the best bit. If there was something the EU was proposing that we didn't like, we could veto it. Now we can only moan about what 'that evil EU' is doing that will impact us, with no say whatsoever.

Hilarious isn't it! We helped make the laws before and now we can only bitch about it on forums.
I’ll file this with all the other Brexit wins! I have been writing them down on the back of a postage stamp, there are so many I might need a second one.
 

Howardfh

Well-known Member
Meanwhile, this return to imperial units has been such a boost! Last night I went into my local and asked for my usual 0.568261485 of a litre of bitter, and he proudly annouced "you can call it a pint now, Brexit says so....".

Wonder if the milkman will deliver bottles in pints again instead of 0.568261485 litres? 🤔
 

jonmorris

Active Member
We can order a pint again? Wow. Take that EU! We won!

I mean, sure, our economy means it's now £7 a pint - but I can just taste those EU tears in every sip!
 

gyorpb

Well-known Member
Anyone proposing a change to the UK (or European) plug? No. It does the job.
“The“ European plug?

dsgvo11mu7061.jpg


As for no-one proposing changes, five seconds of Googling got me this:

 
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jonmorris

Active Member
You Googled to see what plugs are used around the world? Why exactly?

You obviously missed the point that was made - being that we've had mains plugs that haven't changed in decades, so why the assumption that USB-C is going to be replaced anytime soon?

I am pretty sure that the sockets used in mainland Europe are mandated, just as the voltage and frequency will be mandated too. However, if some compelling argument to change things came long then it could be considered and changed accordingly (we've done this in the UK in the past).
 

jonmorris

Active Member
The point is, USB-C has no reason to be replaced anytime soon - just as USB-A will be around for many, many years.

Micro USB wasn't ideal as it was fiddly and easily broken (as a result of being used incorrectly) but it paved the way towards standardisation. No longer does every phone maker have its own connector (as we had back in the days of Motorola, Nokia, (Sony) Ericsson, LG, Samsung etc).

The EU played a role in making that happen, of which the UK at the time was a part.

USB-C has been designed to be more than just a small USB connector. It actually takes the USB spec forward, with plenty of scope to develop and grow. I have some mains sockets with USB-A ports, but will likely change to USB-C in the coming years for convenience. I am gradually building up a collection of USB-C to USB-C cables, doing away with A-C and adapters. The latest cables are fine for high-speed data and power delivery, and don't cost much.

I would love to hear from someone who can identify a proposal from anywhere in the industry to replace USB-C with something new, leaving poor Europeans out in the cold as the rest of the world adopts that instead.
 

gavinhanly

Distinguished Member
Although:

Brexit trade friction caused 15% fall in UK-EU exports in first half of 2021

And it is useful to point out:


From that:

The UK has drastically increased the volume of natural gas being pumped to the EU amid Russia’s war in Ukraine, powering a record monthly rise in goods exports to the continent despite Brexit.

Much of the rise in total goods exports was driven by the rising value of fuel prices rather than volumes of other products. After adjusting for inflation, goods exports were the highest since December 2020, the last month before the Brexit transition ended.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
UK Exports to the EU in April rose to £16.4bn, the highest level since 1997.


“ Exports

Increases in exports to the EU were driven by increases in machinery and transport equipment of £0.6 billion and increases in fuels of £0.5 billion (Figure 3). The increases in fuels exports were driven by exports of gas and crude oil to the Netherlands and oil to Ireland. The fuels trade values suggest that the UK has continued to import Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) from non-EU countries and is increasing exports of gas to continental Europe to fill storage sites.”

We just need a fuel crisis every month to increase our exports throughout the year.
 

Random Precision

Well-known Member
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
I wonder what "hourly-based employees" means?


Is that Zero Hours Contracts or something else? I don't think I've seen that wording with regards to targeted employees before.
 

Res

Member
I wonder what "hourly-based employees" means?


Is that Zero Hours Contracts or something else? I don't think I've seen that wording with regards to targeted employees before.
Presumably staff that are paid by the hour, rather than salaried?
 

Res

Member
Yes, I just wonder exactly how many of those employees they actually have, and if they’re the same as ZHC’s.
Nearly all of those who work in Premier Inns I would have thought.

As for ZHC I couldn't tell you if Premier Inn use them or not.

As well as pay, terms and conditions are likely to increase if companies are trying to attract staff and there's shortages. So hopefully ZHCs could largely become a thing of the past.
 

vinba

Well-known Member
Seems its recovered now so must have been a glitch in the Brextrix.

Not exactly.. The Uk is acting as a hub for oil and gas, both commodities that the EU is trying to wean itself off from Russian supply.. The increase in exports is mainly in this.


But despite that the economy actually shrank

 

niceguy1966

Distinguished Member
“ Exports

Increases in exports to the EU were driven by increases in machinery and transport equipment of £0.6 billion and increases in fuels of £0.5 billion (Figure 3). The increases in fuels exports were driven by exports of gas and crude oil to the Netherlands and oil to Ireland. The fuels trade values suggest that the UK has continued to import Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) from non-EU countries and is increasing exports of gas to continental Europe to fill storage sites.”

We just need a fuel crisis every month to increase our exports throughout the year.
Remember when the Ukraine war started and people argued that the UK needed fracking so it could be self sufficient in gas and it would be cheaper?

This is the reality, we'd export any spare and still pay hugely inflated prices.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Remember when the Ukraine war started and people argued that the UK needed fracking so it could be self sufficient in gas and it would be cheaper?

This is the reality, we'd export any spare and still pay hugely inflated prices.

Because our Government closed all of the gas storage facilities, so we have nowhere to keep the excess gas for ourselves.
 

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