Advantages of Leaving the EU

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Well if you restrict it to domestic flights then there are even less delays over 3 hours. For London to Aberdeen delays between 60 and 180 min its 3.3% and for over 180 its 0.2%.

As for whether people will claim - they jumps through hoops to buy a £10 ticket off Ryanair so you might be surprised.

I’m sure those who are proposing/implementing the change have done the maths, and I’d always be pretty surprised if the consumer actually works out any better off in the end.
 

Dorset Dog

Banned
Well having been involved in airline delay management, I cannot recall a case where a decision was made dependent on what compensation would be paid. The primary thought was protecting the airline operation.

Long delays in the shorthaul operation are very rare as there is more capability in the operation to change aircraft. Doing an aircraft swap for longhaul is much more problematic and time consuming.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Well having been involved in airline delay management, I cannot recall a case where a decision was made dependent on what compensation would be paid. The primary thought was protecting the airline operation.

Long delays in the shorthaul operation are very rare as there is more capability in the operation to change aircraft. Doing an aircraft swap for longhaul is much more problematic and time consuming.

As you have experience in the industry, have the compensation regulations within the EU (when we were a member) ever been flagged as problematic before? I don’t remember seeing them discussed Pre-referendum, but may have missed it of course.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
Well having been involved in airline delay management, I cannot recall a case where a decision was made dependent on what compensation would be paid. The primary thought was protecting the airline operation.
Perhaps because there was parity before. Now there is a financial incentive to treat British domestic flights as secondary in priority.
 

Dorset Dog

Banned
As you have experience in the industry, have the compensation regulations within the EU (when we were a member) ever been flagged as problematic before? I don’t remember seeing them discussed Pre-referendum, but may have missed it of course.
From an operational perspective they were pretty irrelevant as almost all long delays are managed by the Engineering department who have no interest or even knowledge of what compensation might be forthcoming.

As I said, the primary interest is to protect the operation - the biggest costs in delays come if you disrupt the timetable, hence you are looking to see what the effect will be in 2 to 3 days time if a flight is significantly delayed. And the biggest problems from an airline perspective will be aircrew out of hours, airport slots missed, airport overnight closures etc.

I know the airline PR/Finance departments have a view on compensation rates but that doesn't seep down to operational decisions - the only thing we didn't like doing from a cost/compensation perspective was to cancel the flight and put everyone in a hotel - now that did get expensive.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
From an operational perspective they were pretty irrelevant as almost all long delays are managed by the Engineering department who have no interest or even knowledge of what compensation might be forthcoming.

As I said, the primary interest is to protect the operation - the biggest costs in delays come if you disrupt the timetable, hence you are looking to see what the effect will be in 2 to 3 days time if a flight is significantly delayed. And the biggest problems from an airline perspective will be aircrew out of hours, airport slots missed, airport overnight closures etc.

I know the airline PR/Finance departments have a view on compensation rates but that doesn't seep down to operational decisions - the only thing we didn't like doing from a cost/compensation perspective was to cancel the flight and put everyone in a hotel - now that did get expensive.

Thanks for the insight.

Realistically then, the tiny proportion of U.K. internal flights that are actually delayed at all means that the reality of this particular “Brexit benefit” is largely irrelevant, but a useful PR play from the U.K. Government.
 

Dorset Dog

Banned
Thanks for the insight.

Realistically then, the tiny proportion of U.K. internal flights that are actually delayed at all means that the reality of this particular “Brexit benefit” is largely irrelevant, but a useful PR play from the U.K. Government.
given that delays over an hour are pretty rare anyway, I certainly wouldn't claim it was a big deal how you calculated the compensation.

But I am not convinced by your argument that the change will lead to any less compensation - any changes will be trivial
 

Dorset Dog

Banned
That may be true, yet this is being pitched as a “now we’re not in the EU” success story, even though the actual consumer impact is tiny.

i totally agree - but given that outside of the EU it seems we can have an equivalent compensation scheme, why do we need to pay the EU £10 billion a year for something we can design and manage ourselves quite easily.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
given that delays over an hour are pretty rare anyway, I certainly wouldn't claim it was a big deal how you calculated the compensation.

But I am not convinced by your argument that the change will lead to any less compensation - any changes will be trivial

Looking at the proposal regarding “rebalancing” the rates of compensation, in the linked Government document from the article above;


(Page 15)

“ Compensation for delays to domestic UK flights

3.4 We have heard calls from industry to rebalance the rates for compensation, to be more representative of the cost of travel, and to reflect the newer ways consumers choose to travel by air, for example, using more low-cost airlines”

It doesn’t strike me as a proposal based on improving anything for the consumer, nor called for by them either.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
i totally agree - but given that outside of the EU it seems we can have an equivalent compensation scheme, why do we need to pay the EU £10 billion a year for something we can design and manage ourselves quite easily.

I’m not sure the membership fee the U.K. paid as part of the EU was solely for the management of flight delay compensation..

It’s also not an “equivalent scheme” it’s completely different terms.
 

Dorset Dog

Banned
I’m not sure the membership fee the U.K. paid as part of the EU was solely for the management of flight delay compensation..

It’s also not an “equivalent scheme” it’s completely different terms.

Do we need exactly the same terms as some foreign organisation?

If there is a great demand (which I doubt) then I am sure some political Party will have it as an election winning policy in 2 years time.

We have a compensation program - it's arguable whether it is any better/worse or even that different from what we had before - but, as is right, the electorate will judge.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Do we need exactly the same terms as some foreign organisation?

If there is a great demand (which I doubt) then I am sure some political Party will have it as an election winning policy in 2 years time.

We have a compensation program - it's arguable whether it is any better/worse or even that different from what we had before - but, as is right, the electorate will judge.
I didn't say it had to be exactly the same terms, just that it's not.

We're also able to discuss/criticise Government decisions and policies outside of a GE, even though the argument that we're allowed to tick box once every 5 years is usually the outcome of any criticism. :smashin:
 

vinba

Well-known Member
We've benefited from an influx of mass murderers and pyromaniacs by creating more jobs for police and firefighters...
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Even better than BLUE passports -

Never let it be said that Daily Express readers are slightly confused idiots :rotfl:

"While ‘Englishman in Europ’ said: “Remember to get uk stickers as gb is no longer valid. You might get a fine from the nasty Europeans. Blame London."
 

klaxhu

Member
Never let it be said that Daily Express readers are slightly confused idiots :rotfl:

"While ‘Englishman in Europ’ said: “Remember to get uk stickers as gb is no longer valid. You might get a fine from the nasty Europeans. Blame London."
The little things in life, ey ?
 

DE1908

Well-known Member
^^^
Ironically at some point NI may no longer be in the UK, so they could revert back to GB, then a few years later revert back to UK (England & Wales) when Scotland leaves... ;)
 

scarty16

Well-known Member
AN ADVANTAGE!!!


Having incompatible devices is the greatest thing that has ever happened to me (I don't get out much)
By the time this is law, nobody will be using a cable anyway, it will all be wireless charging.

Typical EU enforce the past not try to innovate for the future
 

locallondoner

Well-known Member
By the time this is law, nobody will be using a cable anyway, it will all be wireless charging.

Typical EU enforce the past not try to innovate for the future
It is going to apply in time to tablets and laptops too, a number of new models charge via USB C already. On balance I think this is a good thing - it is crazy having loads of different charging cables.
 

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