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A weekend in Sicily

johnaalex

Distinguished Member
This was our first visit to Sicily. We stayed at the Grand Hotel San Pietro in Taormina. The weather was warm, but most days were misty to some degree so I did not get any good shots of Etna. As much as I liked Taormina the costs, especially with the current strength of the Euro, mean I won't be rushing back there.

The full set is here - Taormina, Sicily May 2008

Click on each picture for a larger version.

Taken with D300 and 18-200VR.

1) Islo Bella as seen from the hotel grounds


2) An abandoned building


3) Look at the size of those lemons!


4) Odeon S Caterina - ISO800


5) The street to the Greek Theatre


6) The Greek Theatre from back stage


7) Lots of "arts and crafts" shops in the narrow side streets


8) And of course - lots of restaurants!


9)


10) The old gate to the main street
 

onefivenine

Well-known Member
This brings back some nice memories.
It is expensive but worth it. Not a single 'Sunday roast served here' or 'all day breakfast' sign in sight. :rotfl:
Blackpool/Benidorm it ain't. :thumbsup:

Photos look a bit washed out. Do you have a circular polarizer?
 

ryart

Active Member
Some good shots there. Lovely place isn't it, but I agree about the prices. Was there a couple of years ago but we stayed inland on the north flank of Etna where it is quite a bit cheaper. I took a picture of the headland in your first shot about 15 years ago and have been wondering exactly where I took it ever since - thanks for solving the mystery :smashin:.
 

johnaalex

Distinguished Member
Photos look a bit washed out. Do you have a circular polarizer?

Most were taken in very bright sunlight, but not sure I would say these looked "washed out". I don't have a circular polarizer - what benefit would it give?
 

onefivenine

Well-known Member
Most were taken in very bright sunlight, but not sure I would say these looked "washed out". I don't have a circular polarizer - what benefit would it give?

A C-PL is very useful especially in harsh sun.
It produces deeper richer colours.
I keep one permanently on the lens during the day when in sunny climes.
Some Sicily shots here if you're interested in a comparison - all of the outdoor shots will have been taken with a C-PL.
 

Tobers

Well-known Member
Hmmmm - looks very nice. I can just see myself sitting having a cold beer overlooking the sea.

A polariser could have helped but not as much as being out later in the day near sunset, but then I reckon you'd have had a load of nasty shadows to deal with.

Lovely pics though, gives the viewer a good feed for the place.
 

johnaalex

Distinguished Member
A C-PL is very useful especially in harsh sun.
It produces deeper richer colours.
I keep one permanently on the lens during the day when in sunny climes.
Some Sicily shots here if you're interested in a comparison - all of the outdoor shots will have been taken with a C-PL.

Dave

Thanks for the tips and can I nick your Etna photo please? :rolleyes:
 

johnaalex

Distinguished Member
Hmmmm - looks very nice. I can just see myself sitting having a cold beer overlooking the sea.

A polariser could have helped but not as much as being out later in the day near sunset, but then I reckon you'd have had a load of nasty shadows to deal with.

Lovely pics though, gives the viewer a good feed for the place.

The cold beer will cost a fortune, but worth it ;)

As I shoot in RAW do you know if there is a way to simulate a C-PL in PP?

Glad you like the pics.
 

onefivenine

Well-known Member
The cold beer will cost a fortune, but worth it ;)

As I shoot in RAW do you know if there is a way to simulate a C-PL in PP?

Glad you like the pics.

A C-PL physically prevents any direct polarised light/reflections from hitting the focal plane/sensor.

This basically means NO, you can't replicate it in photoshop (unless you have the Time Machine plug-in to go back and take the photo with a C-PL ;))


Edit:
Some work in levels and curves should bring out the colour and contrast though :) ;)
 

johnaalex

Distinguished Member
This basically means NO, you can't replicate it in photoshop (unless you have the Time Machine plug-in to go back and take the photo with a C-PL ;))

I did have the Time Machine plug-in but I sold it to you next week :D
 

moob

Active Member
Very nice and puts me in the mood for my break to the Amalfi Coast in 2 weeks time.

Thanks for the reminder on the CPL 159 - almost forgot to get one in time.
 

ryart

Active Member
Interesting comments about using a polarising filter. They can be very useful in some situations where reflections are a problem, but for many subjects it is those very reflections that add to the beauty of a scene. They can certainly give a richer "effect" but I think this is often at the expense of sucking the life out of a picture and giving an artifical look. Useful to have with you but I am not so sure about using all the time unless you really like the effect it gives.
 

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