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A techy question about cable types...

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by Grand Dizzy, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. Grand Dizzy

    Grand Dizzy
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    I was just wondering: which types of cables have variable quality (depending on price & manufacturer), and which cables are all the same? In other words, what type of cables can you buy cheap and they'll work perfectly, and what type do you need to make sure you have quality ones?

    I'm building a HC, so I'm talking about video cables here, such as composite, SCART, S-Video, component, RGB, DVI and HDMI.

    Is it simply just the digital ones (DVI and HDMI) that are consistent?

    By the way, what's the difference between component and RGB? Does component include a black and a grey channel (brilliance and saturation?), like the cable at the back of my monitor has? What is that cable at the back of my monitor?

    Bonus question: is digital really noticably better than a good analogue connection? I saw a Monster SCART connection in Comet today and it was really clear — I can't imagine anything looking much better than that.
     
  2. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    Scart cables are the ones you should not scrimp on. Because scart cables are bi-directional cables which contain lots of signals that you would not want to interact with each other. However, you can get a scart with perfectly acceptable quality for between £12 and £20, you should not have to pay more than that. Belkin cables are good value and quality. Other cables are not so important, because they carry fewer signals, and unless you are buying very long cables, you are not going to notice much difference between any of them.

    Component cables (3 wires) carry a luminence (brightness) signal (Y) which also contains the syncs, and a red signal (Pr) and a blue signal (Pb). Since the Y signal is the sum of red, green and blue, the green signal can be obtained by subtracting the red and blue from the luminance. RGB carries Red, Green, and Blue luminance on the three cables, with syncs usually on the Green signal.

    Digital cables don't only degrade signals less, but they will carry much higher bandwidths, which is important with high-definition TV.
     
  3. Grand Dizzy

    Grand Dizzy
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    Thanks again, er... Nick!!! (Either you're stalking me, or I'm stalking you, or you just really love answering questions here!)

    :)
     
  4. Reiner

    Reiner
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    RGB is technically speaking a component signal. However, the term component usually refers to YUV (YCrCb/YPrPb) only. While YUV is also considered a component signal it's works differently to RGB: RGB seperates the different colors (and horizontal and vertical sync in its RGBHV flavour) while YUV transfers the difference of the signals, kind of compression if you like. RGB and YUV are thus not compatible, even the colors of the YUV connectors imply otherwise.

    So RGB may actually be better than YUV, but when talking DVD there is no difference as the source (that is the picture information on the DVD disc) is in YUV format; your DVD player just outputs a YUV-to-RGB converted signal. If you connect your DVD player via YUV to a TV then the TV does the conversion.

    The cable at the back of your monitor is a VGA cable I assume, it transmits RGBHV.
     

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