A problem with borders

Zeromajor

Well-known Member
I'm relatively new to blu-ray, and due to the current expense I only rent releases.

The past few films i've rented (30 Days Of Night, The Invasion, Mission Impossible III) all seem to be displayed with black borders running along the top and bottom of the screen, like it's trying to feign widescreen, even though my t.v is widescreen.

I suppose this has been asked before, but is there any way to get rid of these borders? I just find it strange how blu-ray is supposed to give me higher definition, but if i'm getting a third chopped off what I could be seeing, it's a bit pointless!

Is it something I need to change in the settings, or an issue with the films?

My lcd is only capable of displaying images at 720p, so could this be an additional issue?

Cheers :thumbsup:
 

Craigy

Distinguished Member
It is the aspect ratio the film is shot in, so to chop off the borders you would need to zoom in your screen, which in effect is giving it less resolution.
 

stuart1976

Well-known Member
A widescreen TV has a ratio of 16:9, which is roughly the same as the film widescreen ratio of 1.78:1. Any movies shot in this ratio will play on a widescreen TV with no black bars.

Films shot with a higher Aspect Ratio - 1.85:1, 2.0:1, 2.35:1 will show black bars, even on a wide screen TV, the bars getting bigger as the ratio increases.

You can use the zoom function or viewing mode on your TV to alter the size of the bars, but you will loose image quality.

This is they way the films were originally shot so you are seeing the film as the director intended.
 

Zeromajor

Well-known Member
I suppose those were the answers I was hoping I wouldn't get :D Thanks though!

This will be a long shot, but is there any way (now or in the future) of having the ps3 take the borders out, by zooming/scaling the image itself?

I've tried the zoom on the t.v and the loss of resolution negates the point of having a bd player (and in most cases actually chops off more of the image that just the borders!

I'm sure directors wish you to see the closest representation of the image as it was filmed. Where are the borders at the cinema? I know it's not quite as simple as that, but I was under the impression that years of black borders on vhs/dvd were the result of incapable hardware or trying to 'emulate' a widescreen image before widescreen t.v's hit the mainstream.
 

BradleyLove

Novice Member
I suppose those were the answers I was hoping I wouldn't get :D Thanks though!

This will be a long shot, but is there any way (now or in the future) of having the ps3 take the borders out, by zooming/scaling the image itself?

I've tried the zoom on the t.v and the loss of resolution negates the point of having a bd player (and in most cases actually chops off more of the image that just the borders!

I'm sure directors wish you to see the closest representation of the image as it was filmed. Where are the borders at the cinema? I know it's not quite as simple as that, but I was under the impression that years of black borders on vhs/dvd were the result of incapable hardware or trying to 'emulate' a widescreen image before widescreen t.v's hit the mainstream.
No borders at the cinema as the height of the picture doesn't change, only the width and cinema screens widen (or shrink).

Our HDTV's are 16:9. Big cinema releases are in 2.35:1. Hence why even HDTV's have black borders.

If you could zoom in, you'd lose definition as the image would be stretched to fit your screen. Furthermore, you would lose about 1/3 of the frame, so you wouldn't be seeing the full picture.

Basically, cinema is much wider a picture than HDTV can handle. Think 16:9 as 'widescreen' and 2.35:1 as 'widerscreen'.
 

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