A little doubt with a rg6 coax cable and my tv/internet service

simpleyei

Novice Member
a little doubt about rg6 coaxial cable.

Good afternoon, I receive internet and tv service from my service provider through an rg6 coaxial cable, which one end is connected to the tv and the other end is connected to a modem / router, I have a problem, since I receive a tv signal from this same cable but the internet signal is dead, the modem does not even make the slightest attempt to synchronize (the modem has been tested elsewhere and works perfectly). Is there a possibility that the cable only sends a TV signal and not the internet due to some failure of the cable itself? or is it impossible for this to happen? Since as I repeat the tv works well but the internet does not even make the slightest attempt to work or synchronize with the modem, I hope you can help me with this question and guide me since they are charging me to change the cable and if this is not the problem It would be a very bad investment, thank you very much in advance and I hope you can help me.

Pos data: I don't know if this is the correct forum to open this thread
 

simpleyei

Novice Member
The cable will either work or it won't.
Talk to your provider and get them to test the line.
hello thanks for your reply, Are you telling me that if the problem were the cable, neither of them should work and if the TV signal works, the cable is good and it should give me an internet signal too? Do you think the problem should come from another source? , Thanks a lot!
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
So you've got two cables coming into the house, both work if plugged into the TV and neither works if plugged into the modem?

And the modem's been tested on the same service at a different property?

I don't know much about cable technology so I couldn't say whether the TV data is transferred in a way that might cause it to work when the internet doesn't.

If not, possibly some sort of authentication issue?

But if you don't trust the competence of your current ISP then perhaps it's time to move to another provider?
 

simpleyei

Novice Member
Hello friends, thanks for your help, I already called my isp and they told me that in the next few days they will send some technicians
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Hello friends, thanks for your help, I already called my isp and they told me that in the next few days they will send some technicians
That's good :)

When you say in your profile you are from "ven" - can we assume that isn't in the UK? Regardless, cable TV has been around a long time and where you are your TV may have the required cable TV "tuner" built in. Otherwise you would have a cable TV set-top box. This signal is NOT internet data.

Adding the internet data to the cable TV service is a bit newer but the technology means you need two things now rather than just the one for cable TV. The internet over cable means the internet comes via fibre optic cable to somewhere nearer your house, where it is converted to a data stream and sent over coaxial cable to your house. That data stream needs a modem to extract the internet signal - DOCSIS is the technology used or the long version is "Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification". The modem is sometimes referred to as a cable modem - this is NOT a cable TV signal.

Does your TV have the cable TV "tuner" built-in so no need for a set-top box?

From the one cable connection from the wall do you have a splitter and two devices? One cable TV set-top box and one cable modem?

Is your modem a combined cable modem and cable TV set-top box? Does it have one marked coaxial input and one clearly marked coaxial TV output? If so this is you splitter and two devices combined.

You cable internet will be delivered from the cable modem via an ethernet cable. It will not be delivered via a coaxial output from either a cable modem nor from a coaxial output on a cable TV set-top box.

A TV service delivered over the internet is different again. That would be part of the internet data delivered only as part of the cable internet service. There would be no coaxial cable that would deliver a signal to a TV coaxial input.

So can you be much clearer what connections and equipment you have?
 

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