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A Crisis of Confidence...

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by roversd1, Apr 25, 2005.

  1. roversd1

    roversd1
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    ...in myself:

    I have lots of empathy with the Rover workers who've just been laid off.

    Knowing redundancy is imminent was no fun for me either. Even though for me, it was last August, it is just starting to sink in, especially as I now work for far less money and debts are starting to get the better of me.

    I've always made money outside of work but now I'm having to rely on this more and more. The stress is no fun.

    I've had lots of interviews for better paid jobs that, on paper, I should have breezed through. But for some reason, I fall at the first interview despite good feedback. There always seeme to be someone who fits in better. I dont seem to have the right 'face'.

    I seem to be doing well where I am (is fate trying to tell me something?), but here they are notorious for their low pay. It just about pays the bills but leaves little for anything else.

    Should I just plug away, keep at it, lose a few years while paying off stuff (4 years left)?

    Anyone want to try and cheer me up? :(
     
  2. eviljohn2

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    I'd like to try and cheer you up mate but don't know how successful I'll be.

    To my mind, the obvious thing is that since you're in a position to, you must continue paying off your debts as otherwise things will only get much worse in a very short space of time. How you go about it really depends on you.

    If you're doing well where you are, what are the prospects of moving up from the position to better pay and a lifestyle more suited to you? Would a different job actually be a better way to move forwards if it's only for the money? Conversely, would changing your lifestyle to suit your current pay packet be possible - undoubtedly not a pallateable prospect but enough small changes can save you quite a bit in areas where you don't necessarily need the extra cash.

    I can appreciate the difficulties in finding work as I'm struggling to find a position myself but don't give up. There's plenty of recent "success" stories on the forums (XoD, Cap to name a couple) and once things have sorted themselves out you'll wonder what the fuss was about. It's just a matter of time. :)
     
  3. Squiffy

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    You're a wonderful person. :)

    And I think I love you.... :rolleyes:

    Seriously though, I know exactly what you mean, with myself being in a position where if I don't secure a suitable internal position I will probably take a very large drop in salary externally. I'm already thinking about the implications of this for how I will handle some of the debts we have.

    The best advice is really to keep going with interviews. Not applying means zero chance of success, so it's always worth having a go.

    Treat every interview as a learning experience. Seek feedback and take notice of it. Look at how your prepare for interviews - maybe you need someone to drill you before you go in, think about what they are asking you and the sort of answer they will look for, etc.

    Keep plugging away - it will all come right in the end.
     
  4. Dr Diversity

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    I back up what has already been written. I am in a role where the pay is poor and the benefits are non-existant. Keep looking, keep applying and something will turn up - for you and me hopefully :)

    I even turned down an interview a couple of weeks ago because I changed my mind about the job.

    Just keep at it - at least you have internet access :)
     
  5. roversd1

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    I love you all.....

    Much better than going to the quack for some dodgy happy pills...

    I'll keep plugging away, and yes you are right in the fact that I'm probably just goingto interviews for the money rather than the job which must show through.

    Keeping at it and thanks!
     
  6. overkill

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    Great advice. My brother advocates excatly the same thing. Even when he's (as now) fully secure and well paid, he still goes to interviews just to see how they are being conducted. That way, should the worst happen job wise, he's ready for it.

    He earns a LOT more than I do............ *sniffles* :D
     
  7. roversd1

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    Well, money wise, I've cut back, got rid of one Merc and put the other on third party fire n theft. cancelled some direct debits.

    Might also sell the merc to halve my monthly insurance payments by driving something cheaper.

    Now its time to tackle that credit card...
     
  8. Spasm

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    Its always good to keep your ear to the ground to see what jobs are around, interview practice is great so the more jobs you apply for the better.

    I would join a "specific to your niche" agency, not reed or some other "I will put you forward to help sell old blankets!" Niche agencies usually have specific industry contacts and can market you correctly. However when you can apply direct to companies without using agencies do this as it is a plus staight away, it shows initiative and an interest in the company you are applying for.

    I would get someone to look at your CV, as this is the first point of contact! I have filtered through CV's in the past and the first thing I look at is the presentation of the CV if its overcrowded or non specific staight in the bin. Then I look at the opening statement. It got to be short, punchy and specific to the job I am trying to fill! If its not there in the bin. This filters about 90% of the CV's straight off so a factor worth taking into consideration. Previous employment and jobs are the last thing I look at, if you look like you have a general entusiam and interest in learning then fine, I don't mind if you don't have the specific skills as you will be trained if you are successful!

    Any how good luck its quite a good time for job hunting as alot of people are trying to fill the 2005 intake! (not alot of head freezes)
     
  9. TT9

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    I don't think there is anything wrong with rovers cv, as he tells us he is unsuccessful at the interview stage. Well a poor cv would not lead as far as an interview so I think there is little wrong here. Furthermore, your recommendation of an agency is good and one which I agree with, but if they are worth anything at all they will know their cv's, and rework rovers if it needs doing so. Its standard agency practise to rework a cv into their own format.

    You say you look at the opening statement for "specific to the job you are trying to fill" else bin, but then state "I don't mind if you don't have the specific skills". Which one is it ?

    Other than his avatar, rover gives little away about his current employment or career path. For this reason its difficult to offer the do's and don't of specific cv writing and interview technique. What will work for one may be grossly misguided for someone else. If I can use myself as an example against your post, I am a self employed consultant and the ONLY things my clients are interested in is if I can hit the ground running from day one, and my employment history. Telling them all about my footy skills is not going to help ! :D , and in fact will end up with me in the bin.


    rover: are you really going to interviews with a view to the renumeration on offer rather than the job itself ? I would agree that it would show through, after all you interviewer may well likely be someone who is trained on interview techniques and look for things like this. I mean if you were hiring would you want someone who *wants* to work and come aboard to make a difference, or someone who wants more dosh than he's getting now ? Having had a great many professional roles, which is the nature of consultancy, and so sat through tonnes of grillings and interviews, I have learnt one thing certainly, which is that is a big sales act, and you must sell yourself to them. Research the company, throw in a few facts and figures which you've picked up, spend the few minutes listening very closely and intently and try and pick the personality of the interviewer and what sort of a person they are. If they are big and brash themselves, then be confident and firm - they won't like the meek and soft. If they are very softly spoken, then keep then tone lower yourself as so not to drown them out so they can't get a word in edge ways. And above all try and gauge what they want to hear and word it accordingly. I mean, if you were a massive playstation fan, you wouldn't go to a microsoft interview and tell them the future of console gaming was Sony's little box would you ? Even if you believe this to be so. You must sell yourself and tell them what they want to hear, because everyone else will be doing the same.

    If i have misunderstood your post, my sincere apologies but it does sound that you actually are going for these other positions solely for financial reasons. For this reason I think you have nothing to worry about: You are getting the interviews so your skillset/cv is fine. When you see an opening you want for more meaningful reasons, notice the job description first and renumeration second, and think 'I would LOVE to work there' you will come across completely different in an interview, as very genuine, and the outcome will be different for you.


    Good Luck with the Job hunting.
     
  10. Squiffy

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    Some absolutely excellent advice there. :thumbsup:

    I always listen carefully to the question, and try and work out WHY they are asking it.

    If they ask how you would deal with difficult customers.... then they do have difficult customers and want reassurance you can cope.

    The job of an interviewer is to work out a few simple things :
    - can this person do the job
    - will this person fit with our existing people / team
    - can they be trusted

    All of the questions you are asked will be attempting to get answers to the above.

    I've got an interview tomorrow for a quite different role to my current one.

    So I've done my research about the expectations of the role, and come up with examples of where my previous experience can be useful in that role. I've also got some stock answers prepared about why I want to change to this new role, where I see myself in five years, etc. It always pays to prepare.
     
  11. roversd1

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    Ta guys.

    My prob is that I'm still a career waiting to happen. At 32, that doesnt add up to good prospects..

    Couldnt afford university full stop so I'm simply relying on my past work experience to get me through.

    I've been in work solid since 97, a few hiccups before that, so not too much bumming around.

    I'm glad that no one has brought up further education, it simply doesnt work for me, I tried doing a computer course at our local College but I found I could learn easier and cheaper if I simply didi it myself.

    I'm currently parts repairing laptops and PDA's, my past is technical sales/ customer service/ installation.

    I feel like I'm on 'hold' until the next big thing pops up.
     
  12. Squiffy

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    Well, I'm 33 and 34 soon with three kids. I'm on my third career now (analyst/programmer, consultant, technical manager), and if I get this new job I'll be starting my fourth.

    So I'd have to say 32 is definitely not too old to define a career for yourself.

    You can do it!

    And don't rule out qualifications. Although I agree that in many cases you'll gain better understanding from teaching yourself - employers LIKE certificates. :rolleyes:
     
  13. TT9

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  14. roversd1

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  15. seany

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    My brother trained to become a social worker at 30 after years of labouring jobs ect.

    Never in your life would you think of our Danny doing anything like that before hand. But he just got up one day and said screw this for a lark i'm doing an access course.

    So if danny can do it, i know anybody can.
     
  16. la gran siete

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    Bset tjhing that ever hapopened to me was when I was made redundant because I went selfemployed and have been so for 20 years Please myself where I work and when I work and answerable to no one.
     
  17. overkill

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    Exactly. The 30 something tends to forget all the life skills they have accumulated and need to sell themsleves better by emphasising them. Good points. :thumbsup:
     

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