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84 inch Home Made screen for £30

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by David_of_Surrey, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. David_of_Surrey

    David_of_Surrey
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    Ok guys,

    I wanted a temporary screen so that I can test screen sizes before commiting to buying one and made the screen attached

    Heres the parts list
    2m X 54 inches blackout material = £14
    1m Black Felt = £7
    1 pot Copydex £5.97 ( I bought too much so could of got the smallest size)
    1 x 32x6mm x 2.1m planed batten £3
    1x 32x 12mm X 2.1 platten batten (free found in shed)
    2 small threaded eyes
    2 x Vine eyes approx 3 inch long
    2 old wire coathangers

    Tools
    Staple gun (heavy duty type not a office stapler)
    6mm stapels
    saw
    scapel
    drill
    scissors
    straight edge
    tape measure


    I decided to make a 84 inch screen which assuming I got my calcs right was 1850 x 1046 high
    decided on a 100mm black edging to left and right and 50mm top and bottom
    cut battens to length (2050)
    cleared dining room and marked sizes on floor (cork tiles) using masking tape
    making sure that battens were parallel and square
    stuck battens to floor (heres how) stick strips about 4 inch long) across batten turn batten over so the tape now goes under batten and you can see some bare adhesive side of tape stick the tape to floor with more strips of tape (parellel to batten) Had about 6 strips per batten. this really did seem to fix the battens firmly.
    Blackout material has two sides one show the threads and the other seemed much finer, I chose the fine side as the face.

    Lay blackout material over battens and position, staple on corner on bottom batten...lightly tension material along lenght and stapel othe corner.
    then other oposite corners on top batten. then stapelled the rest..approx 150mm centres with extra staples at corrners

    next thing was to mark out the edge of the black edging with a biro and straight edge.

    The felt had two perfectly straight edges (top and bottom of roll). cut two strips with scissors (150 mm wide) for the ends.
    Apply copydex to backout material and stick on felt puttting the neatly cut manufactured roll edge to inside of screen, copydex seems to go off in about 5 mins and after 10 is almost impossible to move.

    Cutting felt seemed to be difficult as a stanley knife seemed to drag the fibres, found the best way was to use a scapel with a curved blade. put fel on to wood and cut with straight edge. cut 4 strips about 100mm wide

    and glue to top and bottom need two per batten with a join.

    The whole screen is still stuck to floor with tape.


    left it all to dry for 1/2 hour then trimmed ends with scapel cutting through felt and ling to give neat edge.

    remove from floor and turn over. wrap lining and felt over batten and fix along back with staples


    fixed eyes and postioned those on ceiling , made some hanging wires with loops from wire coat hangers loop on each end... the good thing about these is that I can totally remove them from the room

    to adjust level of screen screw vine eyes in/out


    Thats it.

    Problems.....a couple of ripples but hoping these will drop out if I hang for a while, other wise pretty pleased with result..only temporary anyways..but then again...


    Approx time to make including sorting out position (finding studs in ceiling) and making screen = 4hrs



    Things I wish I'd done first
    Ironed the material
    Used adhesive to fix material to battens before staplling

    now all I need is a projector!!!!!!

    Dave
     

    Attached Files:

  2. mardale

    mardale
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    I did this slightly differently for my own screen (uncannily 84 ' too).

    I bought an 8 pack of rough timber (£4ish) and mitred the edges to the correct size (mitre box cost £4.99 - Homebase's own).

    Getting the frame perfectly square is hard. You can't use the walls of your house - they are ofen not square themselves and few of us want to buy an expensive and large builder's square edge for one job. An option is to use extra wood. Cut two square ended lengths to match the length and width of the inside of the screen measurement. Cut one of the two lengths into two parts, cutting off an extra piece equal to the width of the wood used. When arranged into a + these will provide a square inner edge which can be placed inside frame. This combined with the mitred edges will put you within a few mm's of square or closer. Make it perfect after screwing two of the corners down loosely by using a tape measure diagonally across the frame to check the dimensions are the same both sides. Two people doing this is a GREAT help. Finally screw in the remaining corners, check again, and screw tight.

    I also used black felt, but applied it to the wood before joining them together. I did this by cutting a strip of felt wide enough to stretch all the way around the wood. It was then stethched and stapled onto the wood. This gives a seemless finish on the frame. The mitred edges just need folding neatly (like Christmas present corners!) so that there is only one thickness of felt across them. It's easier done than said. I'm sure it's quicker and less fiddly than gluing.

    Using small metal L brackets (£1.19 for four - Homebase) I then screwed the four batons together - taking obvious care to ensure it was square (screws were free - knocking around the shed).

    Streching the blackout material across is an artform. DO use a proper staple gun - you can't get a good finish otherwise. I started in the middle of the widest side of the frame and then set the staples quite far apart working out from there. The same for the shortest side. Once it was in place I trimmed the excess material so it sat about 1cm from the frame's outside edge, and then stapled again inbetween the original staples, stretching the material quite tight before stapling. I did this three times in all, so there is an almost continuous line of staples around the frame.

    The felt line is perfect around the edge and where it meets the screen, there's no smell of glue, the frame is square and the material is absolutely flat and taught with virtually no give.

    I have it in a dedicated room and hung it by selecting four screws with large heads, then finding a drill bit with the same diameter as the screw head. I drilled one hole just inside each corner of the frame, to about 7mm. Using a paper template I then drilled corresponding holes in the wall and rawl-pulled and set the screws about 10mm proud of the surface. The screen fits onto these screws perfectly, with a secure fit.

    I'll second Dave's final point - for Heaven's sake iron the material first. Make sure the iron is spotlessly clean (buy the missus a new iron as a 'present' to make sure of this? :smoke: ) and iron it on very cool for as long as it takes to get it absolutely flat. And, erm, don't use steam :blush:

    If anyone wants a picture, I'll take one.

    Matt
     
  3. David_of_Surrey

    David_of_Surrey
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    Just made a minor discovery that I will keep in mind for final setting up when my AE 700 turns up

    An Edding 30 permanent marker ( from stationery shop) does a brilliant job of adding a little extra black. I tested it on a scap of blackout material.

    A good sharp edge no leeching of ink at all and a good black ink, I cant imagine that the image will be mm perfect or square so this will allow the final tweaking....so thats the black.....
    What can be used to hide black marks? Tipex/ white tennis shoe polish? or is there a better trick?

    Dave
     

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