55" budget IPS vs VA for home/family use

Osobnost

Novice Member
Yes, pricing changes and can be different as can prices in each country relative to other TVs.
Hello, today I created table of available 55+" TVs in price range 450-$750$.
I created more tabs sorted by selling, price, customers ratings, size and technology.
Can you please check if there is some better value for money then Samsung 55TU7102?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Assuming you have already determined a VA panel is suited to you, and not IPS then the Hisense A series models like the Hisense 58A7100F, Hisense 55A7250 are equal. TCL 55EP641 and Samsung TU7102 are also good value.

Many of the models in the list are last years stock or are Vestel/Cheap rebadges like Toshiba, Finlux, JVC. Some may also be Sharp/Foxconn rebadges, not sure on their quality yet.

The 55" TVs on your list that are selling for 600 are no better than those selling for less than 500 but you may want to pay extra if you require more features. For instance; the Samsung TU8500 has a wider feature set than the TU7102 like extra HDMI ports, different remote control, recording support, blutooth etc.

If shopping at 65" the same models are good value as 55". Hisense A series/Samsung TU7xxx.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
Thanks, in this case thinking about Hisense 58A7100F (507$) and Samsung TU7102 ($528).
Also found Hisense 55A7500 for small discount (553$, noticed in your TVs guide that it should have wide color gamut).

In some comparison here I read comment that Samsung should have better motion and Hisense better picture (maybe caused by wide color gamut of A7500 model, not sure about Samsung TU7102 vs Hisense A7100) . Can be motion big difference causing any issues?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Wide colour gamut is of questionable use on these TVs. It means when you use HDR the TV can display more colours, but HDR is something that will be very hit or miss on cheaper TVs due to lack capable HDR hardware.

Motion on all the TVs will be average, maybe Samsung will be slightly better than Hisense. Motion blur in particular isn't a strong point of TVs using VA panels, so if that's a concern you may want to consider a TV using an IPS panel instead.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
Wide colour gamut is of questionable use on these TVs. It means when you use HDR the TV can display more colours, but HDR is something that will be very hit or miss on cheaper TVs due to lack capable HDR hardware.

Motion on all the TVs will be average, maybe Samsung will be slightly better than Hisense. Motion blur in particular isn't a strong point of TVs using VA panels, so if that's a concern you may want to consider a TV using an IPS panel instead.
Thnaks for explanation. So I will filter out Hisense 55A7500.
Remain only Samsung 55TU7102 vs Hisense 58A7100F.
Which one from this two is better please?
Guess that motion processing and motion blur is mostly related to sports and gaming.
I watch sports and play games only exceptionally. Usage will be movies, shows and YouTube.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
They are about equal overall. Most people would probably go for the Samsung because it has a better smart OS. But the Hisense is bigger and its equal with picture quality and an extra HDMI port.
Wow today started big discount 55" U7QF from 740$ to 600$, checked that it's lowest price here since 6/2020
1618563743759.png


So I go U7Q for 600$ over Hisense 58" A7100F for 509$

I read some A7100F bad reviews below about backlight and corners and decided for 3" less and 100$ more U7Q.

1. review:
"Picture is good. As can be seen in the photo, it has very light bleeding at the edges."

1618564003970.png


2. Comment in YT review:
"I bought it but after i bought it black shadows began appearing on every corner when i read the Amazon reviews this problem was in all the hisense tvs even yours have it too but you didn't played full screen videos so that we wouldn't notice it. "

Hope that I did good decision :)
Where I can find the best source for 55U7QF screen calibration please?
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
The U7Q is still a cheap TV. Its local dimming is basic, it can push out a lot more brightness than other TVs at a similar price which means in some HDR titles it will look impressive.

Its not without its problems though, but you could say that for every TV.

Make sure that you only view the TV head on, because things like light bleed are made worse by watching off-angle when using a FALD TV with a VA type panel. This is most prominent in darker conditions.

For example, the picture above is close up, and at a angle. If the same picture was made head on, the right side of the TV would be darker.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
The U7Q is still a cheap TV. Its local dimming is basic, it can push out a lot more brightness than other TVs at a similar price which means in some HDR titles it will look impressive.

Its not without its problems though, but you could say that for every TV.

Make sure that you only view the TV head on, because things like light bleed are made worse by watching off-angle when using a FALD TV with a VA type panel. This is most prominent in darker conditions.

For example, the picture above is close up, and at a angle. If the same picture was made head on, the right side of the TV would be darker.
T
The U7Q is still a cheap TV. Its local dimming is basic, it can push out a lot more brightness than other TVs at a similar price which means in some HDR titles it will look impressive.

Its not without its problems though, but you could say that for every TV.

Make sure that you only view the TV head on, because things like light bleed are made worse by watching off-angle when using a FALD TV with a VA type panel. This is most prominent in darker conditions.

For example, the picture above is close up, and at a angle. If the same picture was made head on, the right side of the TV would be darker.
Thanks
The U7Q is still a cheap TV. Its local dimming is basic, it can push out a lot more brightness than other TVs at a similar price which means in some HDR titles it will look impressive.

Its not without its problems though, but you could say that for every TV.

Make sure that you only view the TV head on, because things like light bleed are made worse by watching off-angle when using a FALD TV with a VA type panel. This is most prominent in darker conditions.

For example, the picture above is close up, and at a angle. If the same picture was made head on, the right side of the TV would be darker.
Thanks a lot, I very appreciate your advice during my TV buying journey.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
That YouTuber is not the most reliable. He sometimes makes glaring mistakes in his info and doesn't realise.

TVCalibration by Darko, AVForums, HDTVTest are better - with Rtings and DigitalTrends useful but very US/Canada centric.
Hello, today I bought Hisense 55U7QF.
Which source of TV calibration can you recommed me please?
 

vickster

Distinguished Member
You could try searching the Hisense forum for a settings or owner thread
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
@Osobnost you don't have to calibrate TVs now like you used too. Besides, calibration will be different from one U7Q to another.

The review here on AVF scored the TV 8/10 for out of the box picture accuracy, so as long as you are using the Movie/Cinema preset you shouldn't need to change a thing.

One thing to check though, is to disable fast startup on the TV, there's a bug that forgets your motion settings if you have it enabled.
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
@Osobnost you don't have to calibrate TVs now like you used too. Besides, calibration will be different from one U7Q to another.

The review here on AVF scored the TV 8/10 for out of the box picture accuracy, so as long as you are using the Movie/Cinema preset you shouldn't need to change a thing.

One thing to check though, is to disable fast startup on the TV, there's a bug that forgets your motion settings if you have it enabled.
Ok, thanks!
 

Loopthrough

Member
Ok, thanks!
Yes, @Dodgexander is correct. The problem with self-calibration without the correct calibration equipment is you will never know what you're doing.

Calibrated settings given by reviewers only apply to their unit as manufacturing tolerances between units can vary and in some cases different sizes use different panels, so it's best just to use the TV's most accurate picture mode and work from there to your preference.

In Hisense, it's Cinema Day or Cinema Night and a Gamma setting of 2.4 or BT1886. Most people will prefer 2.4.
Motion settings should be turned Off unless you like the "Soap Opera Effect". In Hisense, these settings are usually turned on by default, even in Cinema modes, so should be changed.

Hope that helps and you get many years of awesome viewing from your new Hisense!
 

Osobnost

Novice Member
Yes, @Dodgexander is correct. The problem with self-calibration without the correct calibration equipment is you will never know what you're doing.

Calibrated settings given by reviewers only apply to their unit as manufacturing tolerances between units can vary and in some cases different sizes use different panels, so it's best just to use the TV's most accurate picture mode and work from there to your preference.

In Hisense, it's Cinema Day or Cinema Night and a Gamma setting of 2.4 or BT1886. Most people will prefer 2.4.
Motion settings should be turned Off unless you like the "Soap Opera Effect". In Hisense, these settings are usually turned on by default, even in Cinema modes, so should be changed.

Hope that helps and you get many years of awesome viewing from your new Hisense!
Thanks,
I tried some HRD demos and they looks incredible.
I set all sources to Cinema night because Cinema day looks more aggressive for eyes and at night it's extremely bright. For first visitors I will switch to Cinema day :)
I set also Ultra smooth motion to off.
Anyway I see that I am extremely sensitive to motion probably due to childhood big gaming experience where it was always problem and correct graphic setting was needed.
High quality 60FPS videos looks great but in common low 1024p video (most probably 24FPS) I still see issues even from fast Flash disk.
The same also for some 4k YT videos. I haven't TV wired but measured 145 Mbps download speed in TV's location and YT recommendation for 4k is 20 Mbps.
To avoid interference my Router supports 5GHz and U7Q should support 5GHz too according to manual but in the TV WiFi settings I can't find if my network is connected to 2,4GHz or 5GHz and how to switch it.
I am not skilled in TV's but guess that conversion 24FPS on 60Hz panel will be always problem because "Ultra smooth motion off" will cause lags and "Ultra smooth motion on" will cause soap opera effect like blur. Am I correct?
Wish that I am wrong and motion can be adjusted by one of Ultra smooth motion settings: Off, Smooth, Standard, Clear, Film, Custom (Judder reduction 1-5, Blur reduction 1-5).
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Thanks,
I tried some HRD demos and they looks incredible.
I set all sources to Cinema night because Cinema day looks more aggressive for eyes and at night it's extremely bright. For first visitors I will switch to Cinema day :)
I set also Ultra smooth motion to off.
Anyway I see that I am extremely sensitive to motion probably due to childhood big gaming experience where it was always problem and correct graphic setting was needed.
High quality 60FPS videos looks great but in common low 1024p video (most probably 24FPS) I still see issues even from fast Flash disk.
The same also for some 4k YT videos. I haven't TV wired but measured 145 Mbps download speed in TV's location and YT recommendation for 4k is 20 Mbps.
To avoid interference my Router supports 5GHz and U7Q should support 5GHz too according to manual but in the TV WiFi settings I can't find if my network is connected to 2,4GHz or 5GHz and how to switch it.
I am not skilled in TV's but guess that conversion 24FPS on 60Hz panel will be always problem because "Ultra smooth motion off" will cause lags and "Ultra smooth motion on" will cause soap opera effect like blur. Am I correct?
Wish that I am wrong and motion can be adjusted by one of Ultra smooth motion settings: Off, Smooth, Standard, Clear, Film, Custom (Judder reduction 1-5, Blur reduction 1-5).
There's a bug where motion settings are still applied even after you disable them. You either have to re-enable them and disable them each time you use an app or you have to disable fast start on the TV, enable motion settings, disable them again and it will then stick.

Motion is not a strong point of the Hisense, but its not alone there. It shares the same drawback with motion as other TVs using 60hz panels. Perhaps only Sony and Philips TVs are a little better, but they also carry their own set of drawbacks with picture quality (and cost).

As for the motion settings themselves, you can use them if you like. Sometimes I use them on a low setting so it makes the picture a bit smoother, but not too much to see too many artifacts or soap opera effect. Its entirely personal.

Has to be said that 24fps is very low frame rate and poses problems with stutter even on more expensive TVs (especially OLEDs) so perhaps the problem you are facing is the source frame rate, rather than the TV itself.
 

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