50" TV and peripherals recommendation please (details below)

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
I’ll be purchasing, and would appreciate recommendations for TV, UHD blu ray player, and soundbar. Have done research and show current product thinking below, but have completed the 'form' as requested, and open to hear from the experts.

TV (budget £1,000 max.) Was thinking Sony KD49XH9505BU

UHD Blu-ray player: (budget £300 max.) – was looking at Sony UBPX800M2, though probably leaning towards Panasonic DPUB820

Soundbar: (budget £500 max.) – was looking at Sony HTX8500 or Son HT-G700 – I’d like Dolby Atmos, but appreciate that I might not get great quality for that budget


Extra notes

Room is a rectangle, c. 2.3m by 4m

On one shorter edge there will be the TV (and the door). TV can’t be wider than 1.2m, but TV stand is 1.1m, so I’m thinking 50” TV, because 55” will take this just over.

On the opposite shorter edge is a big window fitted with a blackout blind which I will trial projecting onto. So, projector would be near TV (though won’t get in the way). This is important because the projector would play content from the UHD player next to the TV. It would also use the same sound system. Projector won’t be better than HD quality. Appeal will be more about the 2m wide screen than high def picture quality.

I’m very focused on movies. Anything else I do with it, I care less about (eg, maybe I’ll connect computer to it at some point, but not into Hi-Def gaming, etc.)

External devices:

Soundbar

UHD Blu-Ray Player

Projector?



Content

Netflix

Prime

DVDs, FHD, UHDs

20% SD, 70% HD, 10% UHD (though would expect UHD to grow over time, as amount of content increases)



20% Streaming

10% DVDs

65% HD Blu-Rays

5% UHD Blu-Rays though would expect to grow



Internal apps

Streaming services



Situational questions:

Samsung UE40F6670SB – expecting to see more detail, better darks, better everything

I’m a set and forget

Viewing distance between 1.5m and 2m

Seating position – Primary: dead center; Secondary: up to 30 degrees to the right (though used ¼ of time at most)

When will you use:

20% bright in day, but have blackout blind

40% lamp in evening – will use blackout blind if need be

40% dark movie nights



OLED burn-in: - Will watch some content with subtitles

Legacy connections… don’t think so

No intention to use internal tuner



In descending order of importance

Value

Cost (would like to be £1,000 max)

HDR picture quality

Sound

Blacks

Smart TV ease of use

SDR picture quality

Shadow detail

Picture accuracy out of the box

Viewing Angles

Smart TV app selection



Bugs (in descending order)

  • Motion blur
  • Motion judder
  • Motion stutter
  • Reflective screens
  • Sow smart TV
  • Bad screen uniformity
  • Loss of detail
  • Colour banding
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
The Sony you mention is probably the best and only option to consider. Be a bit wary of expecting everything to look better. The XH9505 is a cracking TV, but it still has 4x the pixels of your old TV and is larger, so you may find you are less impressed by poorer quality material compared to high quality.

You can expect content like DVDs, SD/HD TV and catch up apps to look softer on the new TV, but its the price you have to pay for the luxury of witnessing the higher quality content such as UHD and HDR looking better.

UHD Blu-Ray players and Soundbars I don't really know too much about. They have separate sections of the forum:

For a Sony TV the Sony player may be a better idea. Cheaper and you won't need Panasonic's support for HDR10+. The disadvantage is it converts all discs to Dolby Vision unless you manually turn it off on the player each time.

With soundbars and Dolby Atmos, I'd worry more about the sound quality of the soundbar before Atmos effects. Typically you aren't going to get good Atmos effects when the sound is only coming directly in front of you, so what's more important is that the soundbar sounds good to your ears, rather than accepts an Atmos signal. Best thing to do with audio would be to wait until its safe to do so and sample some soundbars at your local Richer Sounds or AV shop.
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
It's a really good point about the DVD and HD content looking softer. So, the bigger the screen, the softer the non-UHD content will look?

I guess I hoped that would be solved by content being upscaled - presumably more dependent on the UHD player for DVDs/Blurays, than the TV. You just have to make sure that the TV is compatible.

I was also trying to work out what would become the standard between HD10+ and DV, but, if HD10+ is a Samsung thing, I'd expect cross-compatibility as more of a standard rather than this being a Betamax/VHS situation.

And although I'm not going to have loads of UHD discs - I currently have 0! - I'm also anticipating UHD becoming the standard for physical media, and increasingly available streaming. Once I get this tech, I can imagine keeping it all for 5 years minimum.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Upscaling is a means to stretch the image, and the better the upscaling, the better the image will look.

It will however never look as sharp as an image that doesn't have to be upscaled at all (no made up pixels), which is why less-than UHD content, particularly highly compressed content will look quite a bit softer.

There can be good and bad quality sources of every resolution though. For instance, catch up TV is usually SD and very low quality, whilst DVDs aren't as bad.

With HD, HD Blu-Rays can still look very good upscaled on a UHD TV, they are good quality. However HD from catchup services like iPlayer or traditional HD broadcast TV not so much.

Anyway, I'm digressing from the point somewhat. The only reason I mention the above is because sometimes you can enter buying a new TV thinking a new TV is going to polish everything at make it look better, that isn't necessarily the case. Good mantra to keep is to upgrade to a TV with new, high quality content in mind, and not to upgrade thinking everything is going to look better.

HDR10+ and Dolby Vision will co-exist, there's no need for one to win over the other as they both use HDR10 as the standard base layer. If you buy a Sony TV that supports only Dolby Vision and you play a HDR10+ title it will work, but fall back to HDR10.

Same the other way round, if you buy a Samsung TV that supports HDR10+ and not Dolby Vision.
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
Can't thank you enough. I see from your other posts that you are comfortable getting refurbished gear from Sony Centre. I was thinking going to Richer Sounds, buying new and getting the 6-year guarantee. But if I can save a bit on the TV and Blu Ray player, perhaps I can afford a fancier sound system.
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
Oh, I did just realise one, really irritating issue with the Sony TV. The stand is basically at the ends of the TV - specs say the width is 109cm. My new TV unit is 110cm. So, if a door slams, or frankly, I breathe in the wrong direction, I wonder if the TV falls, and I'm in trouble.
 

vickster

Distinguished Member
Think the 9505 has two places for the feet, wide or narrow set, or you can fit an aftermarket one for more stability
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
Final question, I now think that I could rearrange or simply put up with a small overhang of a 55" screen on the 110cm TV unit. I can get a refurbished 55" Sony XH9505 - assuming it doesn't disappear - for the same price as a new 49". Would have to satisfy myself that it is up to scratch or can be exchanged if it falls apart, but the adjustable base would allow me to do this.

It seems there are other things that come into play for the 55" version of the TV that the 49" doesn't have. Are they much better, or are we in the realm that mere mortals wouldn't notice? I guess, a final, What would you do?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
It seems there are other things that come into play for the 55" version of the TV that the 49" doesn't have. Are they much better, or are we in the realm that mere mortals wouldn't notice? I guess, a final, What would you do?
The 55" and up have a wide viewing angle filter so viewing angles on the TV will be better. Sound is usually better on bigger TVs too. Bigger is always better with UHD, 55" is probably too small to discern 4k pixels compared to HD, unless you are using the TV in a desk type setup chances are you'd need a projector size TV, or a very large one to benefit fully from 4k as purely a resolution itself.
 

ddlooping

Active Member
@ChubbySquirrel

If most of the content you'll be watching is movies I'd suggest you go for the biggest (and best) tv your set-up can accommodate and you can afford, regardless of overhang. ;)
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
@ChubbySquirrel

If most of the content you'll be watching is movies I'd suggest you go for the biggest (and best) tv your set-up can accommodate and you can afford, regardless of overhang. ;)
Yep. I've moved where the TV will go, as I'm now thinking 55". And I'm now looking at the Panasonic HZ980. I was cautious of an OLED when it was opposite a window - and a little concerned as I watch a decent amount of films with subtitles. But the quality of the blacks impresses me. This would also mean a step-up in budget, but ho hum.
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
Hello. Honed my choices. I think as good as the 9505 doubtless is, I've been put off by the potential for blooming, and become less fearful of OLEDs. Although the room can be very bright in the middle of the afternoon - I have (a) a blackout blind which I'd use, and (b) two small children, so it's laughable that I'd be watching the TV in the middle of the day.

I'm very focused on getting best performance for films, and predominantly physical media.

That means - HDR will be excellent; Blurays won't be worse, and DVDs will be as good as you can reasonably expect.

I doubt that 65" is going to reasonably fit. So, will stick to 55". So, looking at Panasonic XH980, Sony A8, and Philips 805 as a less-researched option. I'll definitely be getting the Panasonic UB820 4K player. Goodness knows what sound system I'll get.

I didn't really want to spend more than £1000 on the TV, so have been looking at Sevenoaks clearance (appear to be slightly cheaper than Richer Sounds and offer 5 year guarantee on Clearance stock whereas Richer Sounds only offer 1 year. Also looked at Sony Centre (though was put off) and the Panasonic ebay site.

As I expect happens with most people, £1000 is no small change for me for a single purchase, and I'm endlessly watching Youtube comparison videos to no obvious end. It is difficult to step back and say, a mere human would never notice the difference that the tech specialists are talking about, but that knowledge doesn't really help make a quicker decision.

For my needs, is there really any difference between the models I've referenced above?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
For my needs, is there really any difference between the models I've referenced above?
Does this help you?

There's not a huge difference because they all use the same integrated panels from LG. So its only things like picture processing, aesthetics, smart TV, sound and connectivity that's different.
 

ChubbySquirrel

Standard Member
Does this help you?

There's not a huge difference because they all use the same integrated panels from LG. So its only things like picture processing, aesthetics, smart TV, sound and connectivity that's different.
Yes. Thank you. Sorry I missed that before. I think I will stick with the Panasonic if I can find one I'm happy with discounted.
 

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