• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

5.5 pull down

Russell22

Standard Member
I'm fairly up on all the jargon and what things mean etc but when i keep hearing about 5.5 pulldown im totally lost? what is this?
 
D

Deleted member 293381

Guest
Hi

The 5:5 pulldown is what the Americans use to convert 24p to make it suitable for their TVs which work at 120Hz.

24 x 5 = 120Hz. This is the American equivalent of 100Hz.

50Hz x 2 = 100Hz European
60Hz x 2 = 120Hz North America

The mains in America is 60Hz, in Europe its 50Hz.

Alan
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
Hi

The 5:5 pulldown is what the Americans use to convert 24p to make it suitable for their TVs which work at 120Hz.

5:5 is not exclusive to the U.S or 'NTSC' regions. UK sets can also convert 24p to 120p using 5:5.

24 x 5 = 120Hz. This is the American equivalent of 100Hz.

That doesn't make any sense.



The mains in America is 60Hz, in Europe its 50Hz.

Alan
What does the mains have to do with the TV's operating frequency?
 
Last edited:

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
it's actually smooth (equal/better than PAL DVD), if done properly.

24p is far from smooth, i'm not using PAL as a reference in that statement since the source for a PAL DVD is still the same 35mm film shot at 24 frames per second. 24fps that the film industry uses is horrible for fast panning shots and introduces limitations in the camera work, its an unfortunate truth of modern day filming when you consider that 24fps filming was a compromise between smoothness of motion and the cost of film its limitations are obvious, to discribe it as smooth is a joke...

...its just a compromise that became an industry standard, nothing more. Atleast a TV that can show 24p as it was originally shot can avoid introducing anymore judder then is already there.
 
Last edited:

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
ya sure, tell that to the backgound that likes to warp by when the camera follows the actor walking across the scene...


24p can be made smoother by elevating the level of blur...

fix't
 
Last edited:

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
anyway

Most TVs with motion-smoothing tech (that converts low-motion to high-motion) have an option to select the level of processing.

Usually, low is the best option. It will retain the 'film look' while making it appear tad smoother. Mid and high on the other hand can induce soapopera effect, which most people hate.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Is 8K TV dead? Philips OLED+907, Pioneer LX505 AVR plus B&W 700 S3 Reviews & Visit + AV/HiFi News
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom