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5.1 speaker system for PC/small room!

Discussion in 'Shopping, Deals, Discounts & Bargains' started by DaveP, Oct 11, 2002.

  1. DaveP

    DaveP
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    Here

    It looks a lot like the Videologic system but it's only £50.52!

    They also have a cheap DVD Player that may be worth a look here

    DaveP
     
  2. petrolhead

    petrolhead
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    Novatech are a good company to deal with.

    The speakers look canny for a pc
     
  3. Tejpal

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    "4500W P.M.P.O. Output "

    LOL :D

    i bet they will go loud
     
  4. loafer316

    loafer316
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    Hehe they'll be good for small room though!!

    Hey try pronouncing P.M.P.O as one word!!! for some strange reason it cracks me up!! :clown:

    Pumpo!!! LOL :p :D :rolleyes:
     
  5. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    I assume all reading this thread realise what a con PMPO is.
    Peak Music Power Output basically refers to the fact that very fast/narrow peaks in the audio waveform fed to a speaker can have very high amplitudes. The crest factor (proper term for peak-to-average power ratio) will depend on the audio content , of course.
    The RMS output of thse speakers is some 20 watts or so and is what you should use when comparing the real output capabilities of loudspeakers or amplifiers.
    Any PMPO spec isn't worth the paper it's written on !

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     
  6. Tejpal

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    Im very aware of that chris.

    But R.M.S is sometimes not right either... for example, these minisystems tend to be about 140x2watts. RMS. when infact they are measured in a low independance(about 4) so in accual fact this "140w" is accauly about 70w per channel... plus it has about 10% THD :eek:
     
  7. loafer316

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    Can anyone explain the DIN Output that used to be on speakers?
     
  8. enajh2

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    For making a right old DIN, of course!! :p :clown:
     
  9. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    But R.M.S is sometimes not right either... for example, these minisystems tend to be about 140x2watts. RMS. when infact they are measured in a low independance(about 4) so in accual fact this "140w" is accauly about 70w per channel... plus it has about 10% THD

    That's another big con I hate ! What is the use of quoting any specs that involve 10% distortion - commonly seen on some amplifiers & even audio amp ICs - especially the new Class-D types.
    DIN stands for Deutsche Industrie Normen and covers all sorts of related specs - even the size of enclosures.
    I believe the DIN spec someone asked about is the DIN method of measuring peak power - somewhat more ethical than the meaningless PMPO.
    Quote (from Peak Power Meter specs) :
    There are several Europena PPM specifications, but no one universal standard; although the German DIN specification 45406 functions somewhat as a de facto standard. An interesting aspect of PPM design is that rather than respond instantaneously to peaks, they require a finite integration time so that only peaks wide enough to be audible are displayed. DIN 45406 translates this into a response that is 1 dB down from steady-state for a 10 ms tone burst, and 4 dB down for a 3 ms tone burst (this is consistent with the other commonly seen specification of 2 dB down for a 5 ms burst -- both requirements are satisfied by an attack time constant of 1.7 ms (BBC requirement is 2.5 ms). The specified decay rate of 1.5 seconds to a -20 dB level can be met with a 650 ms time constant."

    Chris Muriel.
     

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