4K tv via cat 6 and Ethernet managed POE switch

newbuild2020

Novice Member
Hi Folks

I have two x cat 6 cables going to each room in the house from a central comms room. I have a 48 Poe+ Ethernet switch in comms room and a sky Q box.

I want to send sky Q around to each tv and was going to use a cat 6 to hdmi (4k) transmitter from the sky box and receivers at each tv but from what I’ve read this won’t work as the cables need to be point to point or not through a switch. I’m assuming I need a proper AV matrix switch with x in and y out ports? Is this correct?

if so does anyone know of any 4k (50m or so) av matrix systems that are not more than £200 including transmitter and receivers?

Or if anyone can suggest anything else then great.

I could just buy a transmitter and receiver but that will only give me 1 sky tv connection.
Also I read that 2 cat 6 cables are better for hdmi. Does that mean there are transmitter and receivers that take two cat 6 instead of one?

greatcul for your help.

r
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
I think with your budget you are not going to find anything. You realistically are going to need round 10x your budget, depending on how many TVs you wish to push out to. I would reach out to @Joe Fernand as this is really his area of expertise. But £200 for a 4k matrix or similar is almost certainly not going to happen.
 

newbuild2020

Novice Member
I think with your budget you are not going to find anything. You realistically are going to need round 10x your budget, depending on how many TVs you wish to push out to. I would reach out to @Joe Fernand as this is really his area of expertise. But £200 for a 4k matrix or similar is almost certainly not going to happen.
Thanks Mushii. Just trying to get cheapest (but decent) option as at the end of the build. Might be better with a basic splitter and using the 2 or 3 hdmi sources in the back of the tvs for other things if I need them (along with another splitter). It wouldn't be as clean as an AV matrix though.

@Joe Fernand any advice you have would be greatful.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
Even if you had a basic HDMI “splitter” and used individual sets of Cat-cable extenders then this will still be way beyond your budget, depending on the number of TVs you are trying to serve. And any of the extenders you can get will use compression to send 4k down the Cat cable connection, whether that be point-to-point extenders (and I’d suggest you look at HDBaseT sets as a starting point), or extenders that use ethernet as their transport system. Maybe Joe at The Media Factory could give you some ideas kit and costs for these approaches.

Probably the easiest way if you only need to distribute Sky Q would be to use Sky Mini boxes - these are HD only but at least allow you to watch different Sky channels or recordings at each TV location.You can also only currently have a maximum of 4 mini boxes on your account, of which only two can be viewed at the same time (so upto 3 TVs in use if the main Sky Q box is also being used).

An alternative, if you have TVs with HD TV tuners is to use a 1080p HDMI modulator to pass Sky around the house over your regular TV coax network. These can be bought with Magic Eye compatibility for controlling the Sky box too. That would be under your budget, but relies on you having regular coax cabling to each TV via a coax distribution amplifier.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Your budget usually covers the cost of a programable remote for one zone not the whole system :)

First thing is you do realise if you 'share' the HDMI Output of a SKY Q box everyone has to watch and listen to the same channel when viewing on simultaneous TV's?

How many Zones (TV's) are you planning for? Apologies if I missed that in your post.

Have you looked at using the SKY App on a Laptop or Tablet and casting or connecting that locally to a TV, that may work in one or more zones.

Any modern 'over CAT' system only requires a single CAT cable to each Zone.

Do you have an RF cable network running alongside the CAT cable - your budget may dictate that you try using HDMI over RF and then 'tune' each TV to the RF channel the SKY HDMI is placed on?

HDBT is a chip set which set a standard for the quality of video, audio and control you could expect over a single CAT cable. Extender manufacturers can chose to use HDBT or some other chip - there are plenty options these days, though you have to understand that all of the systems (inc HDBT) utilise image compression when you are trying to push 4K UHD over a CAT cable; how much impact that has on your viewing is down to many variables inc the quality of the TV's you are using!

Joe
 

newbuild2020

Novice Member
Thanks Joe. This all makes sense. I have 7 TVs tgat I’d want to hit. Also I have a coax going to each tv too as well as two cat 6 cables so I could send hdmi down the coax. Does coax use compression? Is it better than cat 6? And does it support HDBT?

note some of the run would be close to 60 meters.
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
Honestly in this situation, I think that Sky Q with miniboxes would be a much more cost effective solution, This will allow more flexibility . You could also connect one of the miniboxes to an RF modulator for a hybrid type solution.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
'Does coax use compression?' - Yes, all of the extender systems use some form of compression, 'over Coax' is potentially more compressed than some of the 'over CAT' options.

As mushii says most systems being designed or implemented now have moved away from centralised sources being distributed in Residential systems and you instead tend to plan around distributed sources and the streaming capabilities of TV's and connected devices; cost and the difficulties of supporting the highest bandwidth sources at all zones being the key drivers in limiting the 'Matrix' type system.

Joe
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
I think that even if you used HDMI over IP to distribute your Sky Content, by the time that you had finished you would still need a budget well over £2k and approaching £3k without any labour or support. Sky miniboxes are £100 each and the cost is £12 per month. so £144 per year and £100 per minibox. Assuming you bought six miniboxes (you get one free with multiroom) that would be £744 for the first year and £144 per subsequent year you could (assuming no price rises) run that system for 15 years and it would still be cheaper than spending £3k on a distributed system. That is why the economics of distributed TV in domestic settings dont generally stack up
 

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