Answered 4K - Actually worth it yet?

Discussion in 'What Is The Best TV For You?' started by Amorris, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. Amorris

    Amorris
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    It's that time of year again, one where jolly old Santa squeezes up the toilet pipes covered in poop (I have no chimney) and delivers our presents. As such, i'm left with the same question i had in my head as last year.... Is it time to upgrade to a 4K TV? This is completely uncharacteristic for me aswell, as a person i'm absolutely bonkers about "new tech" and purchasing it.

    Last year i didn't upgrade due to waiting for the whole HDR format thing to settle and wanting a 55" flat OLED, in 2016 we got this (to some degree) but still i'm left thinking. There still that much 4K content about?

    My main concern, i still don't think we've hit 4K nirvana yet. It does feel close but it seems like we're a step away from 4K sets coming out that you essentially wouldn't upgrade until a new resolution format came out. I got around 2k to spend on a 55-60" set.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #4 by dmw3, Dec 18, 2016 (1 points)
  3. RedAl

    RedAl
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    I'm far from an expert on TV's but with virgin media bringing the new tivo box out imminently I've booked an installation in and with 4k being provided by the new box I'm thinking now is the time to invest in a TV that'll do it justice. I did an online search for best budget 4k TV's and one that came up was this Phillips ultra 4k TV for less than £400. It gets great reviews and has ambilight technology. I'm hoping to get it next month.
    Buy Philips 43PUS6401 43 Inch 4K Ultra HD Ambilight Smart TV at Argos.co.uk - Your Online Shop for Televisions, Televisions and accessories, Technology.
     
  4. Ali Raza

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    Of course...2016 models with hdr r pretty good and sky adds new 4k movies every now and then so the content is improving.
     
  5. dmw3

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    Best Answer
    Part of the issue is cost. When I went from SD to HD I paid an extra £10 on my Sky subs and waited for BBC HD to be launched.

    Now to maximise 4K content you would need premium subs to; Sky, BT, Netflix, Amazon Prime etc. Now if your current subs are a mid range Sky no sports or movies package and you want to get all the above for maxed out 4K and HDR content it's going to cost you an extra grand, yep £1000 per year. :confused:

    Even then you will be lucky if you hit 50% of your viewing in 4K or HDR.

    That's assuming you want to watch the programming that is currently in 4K/HDR, blockbusters, sport etc

    I paid £1150 for my LG 910v a couple of months ago, that's a 1080 tv but I don't watch sport, not interested in the latest rubbish blockbusters, so I didn't bother with UhD. Went for picture quality on what I actually watch not, what I may watch in the future, assuming I can pay the subs in the first place.

    Oh and saved myself the cost of the Tv in 14 months by not paying for premium subscription content
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2016
  6. dmw3

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    Just to add: there is always 8K just a round the corner.....This isn't SD to HD, this isn't just more broadcast bandwith with a vast back catalogue of programming and, film that can be easily broadcast in Full HD because film contains more than enough lines for HD.

    4k and HDR are outside of the standard colour range and picture quality that was set by the film industry way before TV, as a way of standardizing film for cinemas and projectionists for the new colour films. That standard is still being used today to record programming.

    It's a very different ball game to the last major resolution change in our TVs, SD to HD. The broadcasting airwaves can't expand enough to ensure full 1080p HD across all channels, terrestrial and Sky. This means 4K via the Licence fee is a dream for at least the next 3 years, probably 5 and that's being optimistic, only a handful of tentpole programming via the iplayer.

    If you pay for premium sports channels, if you are into console gaming, if you are a contemporary movie buff with pockets deep enough for a UHD player and discs, then yes 4K is probably for you. However, for ordinary Joe Bloggs who doesn't want or have, the money to spend on multi-platform subs it is at this time, a bit of a White Elephant. This is from someone who is an early adopter of new tech, including HD, but not this time.

    4k Nirvana is a lot further away than the TV manufacturers would have us believe.
     
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  7. Waterloodown

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    Great Post @dmw3,

    I currently have a 42inch 1080 LG TV (2009 model) , I finally decided it was time to upgrade and went with the Hisense M7000 65 inch which is 4k and HDR (400 nit).

    For me personally I wanted a larger TV that could tick off the boxes for future proofing and wasn't going to cost me a arm and a leg. The other major factor is we finally getting fibre in my area and I am going to upgrade from 4mbs to 40mbs line speed which will allow me to stream 4k from Netflix, if it wasn't for the line upgrade I would of stuck with my LG tv.

    Problems with anything better then 4k, like 8k film is impractical at least for another 10 years which is when I will probably look at getting my next TV. Netflix for instance recommends 25mbs line speeds to stream UHD with HDR. 8k has 4 times as many pixels as 4k so already your streaming speeds will need to be 100mbs and then needing a streaming service to host those
    Monsterous 8k video files sizes.

    eg. The timescapes 4k video which is 2hrs and 10minutes is 160g in size.
     
  8. dmw3

    dmw3
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    Thanks. You are right too about broadband capabilities. You were also wise with your new tv choice.

    At the moment quite a few HDR and 4k standards have not been agreed on. That so called, future proof 2 grand plus tv someone bought last week in Currys could be out of date in 12 months time because a new HDMI standard for 4k has been released etc

    Having a future proof UHD TV isn't just about hardware but software too. Manufacturers aren't supporting basic software upgrades for smart features on 1080 TVs that are a few years old. Now think about software support for 4k and HDR how much more complicated and expensive that is...yep, that expensive TVs HDR could be useless without the manufacturer deciding to offer the software support.

    Unlike the SD to HD switch the UHD revolution is almost solely manufacturer led. The consumer is also relying completely on software support supplied from manufacturers who do not make a profit from said upgrades. Manufacturers who have already demonstrated that they will happily withdraw support for TVS that are just a few years old.
    I think this whole 4k/HDR thing has the potential to a be a massive fiasco that could come back and bite he backsides of many TV manufacturers
     

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