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4:3 Material Damages Plasmas?

Wobag

Active Member
OK Im one of those people who has been 100% LCD up until now, but Im toying with the idea of swapping 'sides'.

Ive gotten over most of the prejudices of the LCD vs Plasma debate (poor lifespan, burn in etc), but theres one thing left thats worrying me.

Ive read that if you have a plasma you should refrain from showing too much 4:3 material, as the "lit" section ages faster than the black side bar portions would, and you end up with uneven luminosity.

How much is too much? I do tend to like a lot of old comedies etc.

Ive seen tvs with the facility to change the colour of the black bars to something else. Would this mitigate the effect somewhat?

Thanks
 

decto

Active Member
OK Im one of those people who has been 100% LCD up until now, but Im toying with the idea of swapping 'sides'.

Ive gotten over most of the prejudices of the LCD vs Plasma debate (poor lifespan, burn in etc), but theres one thing left thats worrying me.

Ive read that if you have a plasma you should refrain from showing too much 4:3 material, as the "lit" section ages faster than the black side bar portions would, and you end up with uneven luminosity.

How much is too much? I do tend to like a lot of old comedies etc.

Ive seen tvs with the facility to change the colour of the black bars to something else. Would this mitigate the effect somewhat?

Thanks

If you leave black bars on either side of the image and watch lots of old 4:3 you'll eventually notice ageing.

Usually the black bars can be set to grey of different levels so you can virtually eliminate the effect. Grey uses all three colours therefore ages equally to the 4:3.

Or you can zoom / stretch to fill the screen depending on your taste and how important the actual aspect is to you.

Most panasonics are very resistant to image retention IR after the first couple of hundred hours and are quoted with a life of 100,000 hours to half brightness, far better than a CRT and any LCD backlight. I've watched quite a lot of 2.4:1 bluray and DVD without any ill effect top and bottom.

Buy one and enjoy

AD
 

Althotas

Active Member
IR doesn't matter with ageing caused from watching 4:3 or other formats that don't cover the full screen :).

The grey bars works good when watching 4:3 images, on my LG plasma they are by default. After watching several hours 4:3, if you check the panel by selecting an input where there is nothing connected, to get the full black screen, it is possible to see a really small difference (on completely dark room, otherwise it is really hard) between the 4:3 central area and the vertical bars on the sides, but if then you watch a 16:9 channel, that difference disappear after not so long time. I made that check last week, because usually I watch much more 4:3 than 16:9 in my country. My Plasma has now more than 600 viewing hours.
 

toodeep

Well-known Member
I switched black my Panasonic plasma side masks on day one of ownership and haven't noticed any consequences after 100s of hours of mixed viewing including much 4:3 content.
 

WGLOVER

Active Member
Having no long lasting retention problems with 4:3 on my G10 or my 3.5 year old 42PX60. These Panasonics seem very forgiving.
 

Chelsea_Fan

Active Member
I changed my sidemasks to black on my Pioneer 5090 several months ago without any problem.

There's no way I'm going to put up with grey sidemasks on 4:3 content.

This is more important to me than 'protecting' a relatively cheap consumer appliance that is meant to provide entertainment. i.e. I'm not sacrificing my enjoyment of the TV just to (maybe) protect it from long term 4:3 screen uneveness.

Simple as that.... :)
 
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