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37pf9986

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by areuwithmee, Aug 26, 2005.

  1. areuwithmee

    areuwithmee
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    Morning all.
    A friend of mine has a philips 37pf9986 which has a dvi connector. Apparantly this is a dvi-i. He has bought a dvi-d cable will this not work at all?

    Thanks chaps
     
  2. azerpmi

    azerpmi
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    Hope the following helps :

    Often the safest choice for a DVI Cable for a new DVI video card connecting to a DVI Monitor is a DVI-I to DVI-I single link cable. If the card and monitor are more resent a dual link cable may be needed. In most cases either will work. If a connection is DVI-D, and properly designed, you will not be able to plug in a DVI-I cable but should use a DVI-D cable, even if one of the devices you are connecting is DVI-I. If your monitor is older and you want to ensure that you are using the digital connection, a DVI-D cable would usually be a better choice.


    About DVI connectors
    A DVI connection can be one of three types - DVI-I, DVI-D or DVI-A.

    DVI-I:
    DVI-I contains both the digital and analog connections, (DVI-D + DVI-A) , it's essentially a combination of DVI-D and DVI-A cables within one cable.

    DVI-D:
    DVI-D (like DFP or P&D-D (EVC)) is a digital only connection. If both devices being connected support a Digital DVI connection (DVI-I or DVI-D compatible) and are compatible in resolutions, refresh rates and sync, using a DVI-D cable will ensure that you are using a digital connection rather than an analog connection, without playing around with settings to assure this.

    DVI-A:
    DVI-A is really rare. Why use a DVI connector when you can use a cheaper VGA connector? see DVI-I P&D-A (EVC) is more common with projectors, and you should go to your projector manufacturer for recommendations.
    Dual Link: Dual T.D.M.S. (transition minimized differential signaling) "links". DVI can have up to two TMDS links. Each link has three data channels for RGB information with a maximum bandwidth of 165 MHz, which is equal to 165 million pixels per second. Dual-link connections provide bandwidth for resolutions up to 2048 x 1536p.

    Single Link: Single T.D.M.S. link. Each link has three data channels for RGB information with a maximum bandwidth of 165 MHz, which is equal to 165 million pixels per second.
    Bandwidth for a single-link connection supports resolutions of over 1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz (HDTV).

    Dual link vs Single Link: Don't believe the "hype" some websites are using about dual link cables being superior to single link cables. A single link cable is 100% as good as a dual link cable for single link equipment which covers about 99.5% of current equipment, including HDTV's, Projectors, Plasma Screens, and High Definition Set top Boxes. A better quality cable is a better quality cable, and single and dual link has nothing to do with quality. On the other hand, if both devices being connected support Dual links, then a dual link cable is the proper cable for the application, and you will have the capability of much greater resolutions and refresh rates. A properly designed Dual link cable should have no negative effects when used with single link
     
  3. azerpmi

    azerpmi
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