32-37" A/A+ Low Consumption/High functionality - Possible?

chalk40

Well-known Member
Morning all - looking to replace our bedroom/kitchen room TV's but want ultra low consumption / high efficiency (A/A+) TV's to replace our units and would appreciate your input.

Essentially looking for:

- small format 32"-40" max (I know 32" is a rare beast these days)
- high functionality 4K / DNLA / RJ45 / Freesat / Freeview ... as many modern day bells as poss
- Ultra low power consumption

I have several Panasonic tx-l32dt30's linked on RJ45 and with Freesat/Freeview connections throughout the house and have been doing first class service if a little long in the tooth now.

Functionally they are still great but I'm now going through each room and replacing all my stuff with low consumption equipment. Currently I doing the kitchen and went LED on all lights, new low consumption washing machine, dish washer and tumble dryer. But I'm struggling with the TV.

I can see no 32" 4k TV's with Freesat ... in fact no 32" 4K sets at all.

For the kitchen I can go larger & was thinking Samsung UE40KU6470? We can handle the larger frame here but other rooms are space constrained.
Interested in your ideas to keep the functions of the past, the current and save power.

Many thanks
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
4K's a technology for big TVs, even at the closest distances you'd normally view a TV from it's only really of benefit for 55-65" and above. I suspect the reason it's showing up on smaller TVs at all is part marketing ('have what the high end has!') and part because it'll ultimately work out cheaper if everything else is being developed for one resolution instead of two.

Bear in mind that the EU Labelling of power consumption/efficiency is not done on a like for like basis. The rating is size dependant so an A-rated 40" TV consumes more than an A-rated 32" TV. There's also no control for factors like brightness that affect power consumption, it's done purely on the manufacturer's out of the box settings.

Personally I'd be looking at numbers from a source that does like for like comparisons, Which? is probably your best bet for budget TVs like these. Your library may have a subscription (possibly online) or they often do £1 trial offers.

To take a couple of random examples, Which? found that the K5500 consumed 34W in their test but shows 40W on the sticker, while the DS500B consumes 35W in their test but shows 32W on the sticker.

And bear in mind you're going from an £800 TV down to a £300 one, and that's ignoring the exchange rate drop. Don't expect them to match the picture quality of your existing model.
 

chalk40

Well-known Member
4K's a technology for big TVs, even at the closest distances you'd normally view a TV from it's only really of benefit for 55-65" and above. I suspect the reason it's showing up on smaller TVs at all is part marketing ('have what the high end has!') and part because it'll ultimately work out cheaper if everything else is being developed for one resolution instead of two.

Bear in mind that the EU Labelling of power consumption/efficiency is not done on a like for like basis. The rating is size dependant so an A-rated 40" TV consumes more than an A-rated 32" TV. There's also no control for factors like brightness that affect power consumption, it's done purely on the manufacturer's out of the box settings.

Personally I'd be looking at numbers from a source that does like for like comparisons, Which? is probably your best bet for budget TVs like these. Your library may have a subscription (possibly online) or they often do £1 trial offers.

To take a couple of random examples, Which? found that the K5500 consumed 34W in their test but shows 40W on the sticker, while the DS500B consumes 35W in their test but shows 32W on the sticker.

And bear in mind you're going from an £800 TV down to a £300 one, and that's ignoring the exchange rate drop. Don't expect them to match the picture quality of your existing model.
Frustratingly good and solid advice EndlessWaves. Yes the Pana's we have are almost a perfect TV, were over spec'ed for their time and mad expensive at RRP when launched. Think it was more like £1100! Then Pana realised no-one buys 32" at 1100.

We have collected about 7 of them (at other people's first user expense and/or repair of stock faults) installed in each room in a nice manageable way .... they just suck a lot of juice and the thorn in our side given some major efforts to change our lifestyle habits.

You would think given the time we live in that there might be a source somewhere that analyses this data. Which is as good a place to start as any as you rightly say. But as you say Quality Vs Power Consumption it's going to be a tough call to beat.

Thanks for taking the time.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Have you actually measured their power consumption? It may simply be that the original quoted figure is maximum power consumption and they don't consume significantly more than a newer model in practice.

In five or ten years we'll hopefully have RGB Self-emitting displays at 32" which should boost picture quality and reduce power consumption.

There are high quality 32" displays in the form of PC monitors, but they're typically high resolution and use more power even before you add the external set top box that would be required for TV use:
AOC U3277PWQU & Philips 328P6VJEB review: the bar is rising
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
I would measure their power consumption as already said. I would also consider the maths of buying new TVs considering you will also have to take a drop in quality at that size, particulary with motion. There aren't any 100hz TVs made at that size anymore, certainly not any TVs with 100hz and 200hz backlight drive. The closest TV I can think that has similar motion performance to this would be the DX750/EX750 that is available at a minimum of 50".

The difference in power consumption is likely not going to save you in 10 years what it will cost to replace the TVs and you will be getting something of lower quality unless you can find a TV like a Samsung H6400, Samsung J6300 which are 2014 and 2015 models respectively, they also may not be fantastic with power consumption.
 

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