2nd home-this time a gut and rebuild.

TattyWill

Standard Member
Hi all,

We just sold our first property at £8000 more than what we bought the new property for. While making a £49,000 profit after two years of living there. House prices in our area are extortionate for what they are. But we are right next to Gatwick airport so its expected. In order to move up in the property ladder/game we had to buy a pretty run down property and do it up if we were going to make money on this one too.

I managed to get permission to build a floating wall in the first property with LED lighting surrounding after many months of scouring the AV forums a few years ago.

***old house floating wall***
IMG_4521_zpsckx0uqfx.jpg


We were running...
-42" LG TV,
-PS4/PS3 streaming Netflix etc
-A couple of networked 3TB drives with all our movies and content connected with our Macs, iPhones and iPad etc.
-Apple airport Expresses connected to multiple speakers around the home.
-A crap 60W sound bar from Tescos/replaced with my old 2.1 Hifi set up when the sound bar went bang.

I am interested in running some form of CCTV in the new home too.

I was hoping to use these in the new property but all connected in some form of AV/Server rack in a cupboard somewhere. (I may need a little help from the forums looking for ideas on that one).


This property was a old hunting lodge that had been converted 20+ years ago from what we had been told. it took 6 months for the sale to go through we were right on the edge of having to renegotiate a new mortgage offer which wouldn't of been ideal as the wife was now considering staying off work to look after the little one. so we wouldn't of had as good of a deal as we currently had. in this time we were told we had to get the current owner to extend the freehold lease as it was too low. (another thing the estate agent had neglected to tell us)

We knew the property would require work but we had no idea how much was really needed. The previous owner was a bit of a bodger so we have had a massive headache dealing with what he left behind.
-His boiler had broken THREE years ago but didn't bother to get it fixed so he just left it. - this was great for introducing damp to the old walls, we had damp present in 4 of the rooms in the property.
-He had the meter taken off and started running a monthly guesstimate charge. (the opposite way to save money, unless he bottled his water and sold it)
-All of the sockets in the house were spurred off of one double socket in the kitchen. Im amazed the property hadn't burned down.
-He had only left us 3 lightbulbs in the house, but im sure thats how he lived.
-The kitchen was unusable and nothing worked. I dont know how he lived/survived in there. all of the doors were bowed the appliances were deadly. The oven door was permanently open too.
-He was a heavy smoker, the house stunk and all the walls/furniture was yellow. Even more of a reason for a complete gut.

We knew we were going strip the kitchen out but we weren't looking forward to buying a new one. Luckily around a week before our moving date we had actually found a secondhand kitchen on eBay which we were at a loose end as if we were going to put a bid on. I messaged the guy to ask a few questions but later passed and didn't bid. After a few days of the auction finishing we had a phone call from the guy offering the kitchen to us for free if we could pick it up. Obviously we jumped at the chance, rented a luton from our local dealer and drove a hour into Croydon to find the address. After a small talk with the person who popped the kitchen onto eBay we found out it wasn't his house but he was a builder for them hoping to make some money on the side. We were going to chuck them a bit of money but we thought they were a little rude and had found that the half of the kitchen doors had bowed due to being stored in a damp garage for a while. (that wasn't listed on the eBay auction).

This was all stored at the in-laws while we waited for the completion day. Needless to say neither me or my father in-law were looking forward to moving this again in a weeks time.
 
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TattyWill

Standard Member
Ill make a note that I work at Gatwick so im doing most of the work myself after 12 hour shifts. So far as a write this im about 2 weeks in...... and im pretty shattered but it is exciting to see it take shape.

We had a little help from the family on the moving day, we all decided it would be cheaper to rent out a luton and move ourselves. I dont think ill do this next time as it was hard work.
I never even thought we had that much stuff in the house. We ended up making just two trips in the end, one for all our items still left in the house, one for the 2nd hand kitchen. It would of been easier if we had flat packed it. But nah we just lugged the carcasses and half dismantled kitchen in bulk. (again.... a lesson learned) In the move the existing worktop had broken. (much to my joy. I didn't like it anyway) We have since bought a couple of oak worktops from a eBay seller called Kitchen Surplus for under £300. Ill post pictures of these as the kitchen takes shape. Thankfully all of our gear was packed in cargo containers. so we didnt have to use cardboard boxes. These are all currently sitting in each room and being moved when the work needs it.

So onto the pictures of us stripping the house....

As mentioned the first thing we saw to be replaced was the boiler and central heating, copper pipes and all. I actually made £105 scrapping all the existing copper pipes from the household, I still need to take the radiators/boiler there but know I wont get as much so im leaving that for a while...

The Kitchen is quite narrow and small. We do enjoy cooking and we aren't to bothered about spacing so we had a few options.

As you can see the boiler had a tag on it deemed as unsafe and not to be switched back on.
I loved the fact we were getting rid of this hazard.
When we started dismantling the cupboards, we found various things propping them up like a can of metal paint and a 12'' masonry drill bit.

IMG_9952_zpsl07sssqe.jpg


This was the drill bit was left behind in one of the cupboards. It was actually supporting it too. I was happy he left it. it did wonders on a 14 inch wall we have for cabling
IMG_9953_zpsfc0njrgv.jpg


As mentioned, The Kitchen was a little dated and not in the best state. I was more than happy to get rid of unclosable cooker.
IMG_9954_zpsqwnenvnu.jpg


When we got to this stage we noticed the pipes were in a dire state and again reassured us that the whole lot needed replacing. Luckily we know a great plumber/boiler technician.


You can also just see the 3 layers of white tiles place on top of another, another great bit of bodgery.

IMG_0004_zpsuvtux89p.jpg


IMG_0008_zpsuhxmig6k.jpg


This weighed a ton. and took hours to disconnect from the mains as it was still live in a mess of wires. Ive never felt like more of a bomb technician.
IMG_0007_zpsicv4bftn.jpg

This configuration is going to be swapped with a modern/smaller combi boiler. the great news for this is we could get rid of the two emersion tanks in the ceiling. Which freed up loads of space.


This photo makes it look tiny, although it is a descent size the only way I could get a reasonable photo was from a vertical panorama shot, this also shows our new clean piping and boiler. This also weighed a ton, and was a great laugh to get it up that high onto the wall. We were hoping to fit it in one of the wall hanging cabinets. it wil stick out a few inches ontop. Luckily it is only me that will see that. The Mrs is a whole 12" smaller than I am.

The only downside we have found by all the works so far is all the drilling of new holes around the house. As mentioned these aren't small walls. the outside wall on this side is 14" it was a pain to drill a hole for the new boiler exhaust.
IMG_0062_zpsraykcoza.jpg



While this work was being carried out, I had to go to work for a couple of days in this time the father in law was going to carry on without me. I had left him alone with what I thought would be helping the plumber drill some more holes etc. Instead he had ended up ripping out the two emersion tanks by himself. It was one hell of a shock when I walked back through the front door. This is what I had left behind.
IMG_0009_zpsagohfhou.jpg


You can see we had really high ceilings, we knew this was a stud wall//ceiling combo but didn't realise it housed two tanks.

I walked through the door and this hit me in the face. I was godsmacked. It really showed off the height we had to play with. They are around the 9.5' mark, Instantly I thought floating ceiling with downlights. So that was my next task to build the frame work for that.
IMG_0030_zpsao07u3rw.jpg



Before that I went onto remove the rest of the fake archway in the doorway.
You can see it leads to a really weird shape above the bathroom door. Originally we thought we could just remove that and give the bathroom a high ceiling too. Quickly found out it is like that as it was resting on a concrete plinth.

IMG_0031_zpsuhttcecy.jpg


So I had the idea of just keeping it as a cupboard. for non essential items. OR A server rack of sorts. Its a great central point to the house. the down side would be it is out of sight for remotes/receivers. Im not to sure how to get around that with AV equipment on a budget.
So for now im leaving it open while we are doing the wiring for lighting/electrics etc.

IMG_0067_zpsncfr6sve.jpg


This is the opposite side of the cupboard space. This was a supporting beam. It had good 5" nails through it. Needless to say it was going. I ended up splitting it with a chisel and bending the nails in opposite directions until they snapped in the wall. This will be skimmed when I finish off the lighting in the ceiling.
 
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TattyWill

Standard Member
Right sorry for the dodgy photo. You can see Plasterboard up on the makeshift cupboard.


Now it was time to start on the frame work for the ceiling....

IMG_0061_zpsy9ziigcw.jpg



Framework was started with enough space for cabling and room for the rear of the LED downlights to breathe. just using 2"x3" timber.
This was a great excuse to use the plumbers heavy duty hammer drill.
IMG_0066_zpsm3qr55rv.jpg


I ended up snapping the conduit off of the wall while keeping the cable intact. this will be hidden above the ceiling. I will also need to do some channeling out for the existing cabling following into the next hallway.

IMG_0075_zpshdte9djn.jpg

IMG_0074_zpsnkbqvtcz.jpg

Even thought I can imagine the fire alarm hasn't worked in years... I had visions of it going off while being hidden behind the ceiling. IT WAS coming down. I just couldn't stop laughing about the thought of my wife being pissed off if I did leave it there. :rotfl:

IMG_0113_zpspmqwgfxg.jpg


No installation yet. I had to put the Plasterboard up there, the plumber kept lying down on it while drilling holes. Im leaving it to be skimmed over when the rest of the ceiling is up.

The next day we received a delivery of the bathroom. We ordered from www.betterbathrooms.com, I have to say the quality of the bathroom and taps is incredible. The downside was we paid for next day delivery, It took two days. We called up at the end of the first day to be told that the driver couldn't make it and dropped the bathroom back of at the depo. I needed it to turn up that day due to being off work. I had to get family to wait around for the delivery the next day.
IMG_0064_zpszisysow2.jpg

Again Love the product. bit miffed about the delivery/no contact though.


ILL upload the rest of the photos tomorrow morning, need to take the parents to the airport in the morning.
 
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Phil1975

Distinguished Member
Subscribed...[emoji106]
 

TattyWill

Standard Member
Tiles are much easier to stick to other tiles than any other surface.

I agree, But three layers was a bit much. These were all going anyway. The flooring was the same too. You can see in one of the photos of the ride side of the kitchen, the tiles were resting over a double socket. And didn't match with the tiles behind.
 

chrisw

Well-known Member
We had a delivery from better bathrooms - a few radiators, which turned up a little earlier than the 8am slot... 6.25am! I wasn't quite ready to deal with anything at that time of the morning!
 

Minty

Well-known Member
I used Betterbathrooms for all my bathrooms. A few issues mostly due to me having the bits on site for 2 years before I used them and found problems. They did sorted all of them out.

Excellent progress so far. Well done

M
 

TattyWill

Standard Member
I see your saying your doing the electrics, are you an electrician?

Im not a electrician no, Ive working along side two electrician mates though so i'm in good hands.

One of our fun jobs together was actually the moving of our fusebox.

even though we aren't part of the flats next door to us we all share a communal cupboard where our electrical meters/fusebox's were situated, I came up with the idea of having it in the most logical place.... inside the house.
We had a talk and decided that it was do able just a hard few hours work. We started by switching off our electric supply and then started installing a brand new consumer unit inside our kitchen.

I hadn't seen a cable as big as this, it wasn't easy to navigate through stairs and joists and through the roof of our kitchen either.
IMG_0087_zps0dgi0q7t.jpg


Moved the exsisting unit from under the stairs on the left, through the floorboards and outside into the kitchen.
IMG_0084_zps2ksvbruc.jpg



The mess of existing cables to navigate....

IMG_0080_zps9bsmqorc.jpg



The temporary socket to power things while the electrician was away.
IMG_0105_zpspjwk58xo.jpg
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
It depends on who's doing it. It might be dangerous for a novice, or sound dangerous to those who have no knowledge of electrics, but just because you are required to have Part P doesn't mean that doing electrics yourself is dangerous if you don't. In some cases, it may be more dangerous having a Part P qualified individual do the work:

Part P of the building regulations scrapped!

For example, I know people who do wiring and electrical testing in industrial buildings - if you do things wrong there, you can potentially kill a great many people. However, those people are not 'qualified' to wire your house. They are trained using the same regs as domestics though, including update courses, they just don't possess the bit of paper that says they can do domestic stuff.

Similar thing with gas regs - some people are qualified to work on huge industrial gas installations with gas pumps and boilers with million BTU output, but are not not allowed to touch the little gas boiler or gas fire in a house.

If you read the example in the above link, you can see why in some cases it's safer to do it yourself if you have the experience, but not necessarily the qualification.

Gary
 

ufo550

Distinguished Member
It depends on who's doing it. It might be dangerous for a novice, or sound dangerous to those who have no knowledge of electrics, but just because you are required to have Part P doesn't mean that doing electrics yourself is dangerous if you don't. In some cases, it may be more dangerous having a Part P qualified individual do the work:

The current edition of BS7671, gives two definitions; instructed person (electricaly) & skilled person (electrically). A skilled person (electrically) 'A person with technical knowledge or sufficient experience to enable him/her to avoid dangers which electricity may create'. And includes adequate education, training or practical skills.
Part P is a building regulation. It is not a qualification.

Part P of the building regulations scrapped!

For example, I know people who do wiring and electrical testing in industrial buildings - if you do things wrong there, you can potentially kill a great many people. However, those people are not 'qualified' to wire your house. They are trained using the same regs as domestics though, including update courses, they just don't possess the bit of paper that says they can do domestic stuff.

I cannot disagree with you there.

Similar thing with gas regs - some people are qualified to work on huge industrial gas installations with gas pumps and boilers with million BTU output, but are not not allowed to touch the little gas boiler or gas fire in a house.

If you read the example in the above link, you can see why in some cases it's safer to do it yourself if you have the experience, but not necessarily the qualification.

I do disagree with you there. Being a skilled person (electrically) requires adequate education, training or practical skills and some form of qualification from that training/education.

Gary

If you expand you above reply, I replied to some of your comments in red.

Part B of the Building Regs, requires certain electrical works to be notified to the LBC. This must be done via one of these three ways;
1) Self certification by a registered competent person
2) Third Part Certification by a registered third party certifier
3) Certification by Building Control.

If you do not comply with above, you could found to not be complying with Building Regs. None compliance with building regs, is a criminal offence.

You can obtain a regularisation certificate from LBC after the work has been completed. My LBC charges £660 for that service.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
You missed my point which referred to something being dangerous.

If you look at the link I provided, being qualified doesn't necessarily make someone competent, or more competent than someone who conforms to the definition of competence - just sufficient experience to enable him/her to avoid dangers which electricity may create' which was my original point.

Look at an install that was done 20+ years ago which were then regs compliant and deemed safe then, does not mean they are dangerous now, even though they are not regs compliant now. Being non retrospective also means those installs can remain that way - houses pretty much become non compliant with every regs change, but they don't become dangerous overnight.

I had to pay to have someone (suitably qualified) replace the main db which is in my kitchen when I bought this house, yet he didn't do anything different to how I would have done it, and he did the install to how I wanted it done, so I now have the required paperwork. Had I done it, it would not have been dangerous. It would have been the same, the only difference being who has what paperwork to allow them to do certain work.

Gary
 

ufo550

Distinguished Member
You missed my point which referred to something being dangerous.

If you look at the link I provided, being qualified doesn't necessarily make someone competent, or more competent than someone who conforms to the definition of competence - just sufficient experience to enable him/her to avoid dangers which electricity may create' which was my original point.

Look at an install that was done 20+ years ago which were then regs compliant and deemed safe then, does not mean they are dangerous now, even though they are not regs compliant now. Being non retrospective also means those installs can remain that way - houses pretty much become non compliant with every regs change, but they don't become dangerous overnight.

I had to pay to have someone (suitably qualified) replace the main db which is in my kitchen when I bought this house, yet he didn't do anything different to how I would have done it, and he did the install to how I wanted it done, so I now have the required paperwork. Had I done it, it would not have been dangerous. It would have been the same, the only difference being who has what paperwork to allow them to do certain work.

Gary
Don't disagree with you first point, plenty of examples of installers who are carry out electrical work, who haven't had the appropriate training, education, experience and qualification. Their are countless people who carry out DIY electrical work, without any of the above.

I agree with your second point, and don't think I suggested otherwise.

Thirdly; replacing a consumer unit also requires testing and certification. Testing requires fairly expensive test equipment (multi function tester) and experience & knowledge to interpret those test results. And as it is new work, that the earthing and bonding is satisfactory. If you were confident enough and had suitable equipment & experience, you could of approached your LBC beforehand, and done the work yourself.

Anyway, I've hi-jacked the OP's thread enough now.
 

TattyWill

Standard Member
Ive been busy with the bathroom, the suite was actually ripped out within the first 2 days of owning the property, but it has stayed empty ever since as its the last thing to be connected to the boiler and has one of the ringmain running behind it,

Before
IMG_9956_zpsoapkk6f2.jpg



After - looks even smaller than it is in this one. This dehumidifier came with the house and it did a evening in every room before it gave up the ghost. Did a great job though. :clap:
IMG_0045_zpsj69okvzr.jpg


IMG_0166_zpsylemair3.jpg


With browning and flooring

IMG_0191_zpsu1cl6nrr.jpg

The floor was lovely, not my first choice but still looks good. Its "Quick Step Soft Oak Light" Great water proof with Bevels and V cuts.


****now the tiles was a hell of a story**** we actually visited quite a few places and the Mrs kept going for the most expensive tiles. now it wasn't really a issue but I didn't really fancy spending £500+ on tiles on a place that i'm really trying to save money for....you know for the AV side of things. :cool:
We actually ended up buying the tiles from "Tile Depot" 10 square meters worth for £320 - now I know this was a little steep but she did like them so I thought what the hell. (whilst placing the order they mentioned that they were merging with "CTD" which was 2 shops down. we didn't see that as a issue as they said it would be ages and we could still return them if there were any issues).

I got the phone call around 2 days later to pick them up, took them to the house and waited another 2 days until the Mrs decided she didn't think they were the same tiles as they ordered.
I drove back to the Tile Depot and found that they had actually closed down!!! I was a little miffed. (now the staff in there were great, friendly etc. but the guy that took over from our salesperson was pretty grumpy and had tried to sell me stuff I really didn't need-long story short I did buy but took back the gear he sold me) I went to "CTD" and they said the company had actually been bought out and closed down not to be merged together, I was told to ring the manager a day later to see what he could do.... Luckily I was allowed into the "Tile Depot" whilst it was being disassembled for my refund. Which was great and I had no bad feelings towards them as I've been in a similar situation where you dont know what was going to happen with the company you're working for. It was just a lot of hassle for tiles I wasn't to keen on in the first place.

After talking to our plumber he had mentioned that he had a account with "Rogers Ceremics" in Crawley, The Mrs went there picked some tiles and chrome strips up for £170. and was told that the tiles were of a much higher quality too. So in the end it was a win. Ill be fitting the tiles once the suite is fitted in a couple of days.
 

Plasma Dan

Well-known Member
It depends on who's doing it. It might be dangerous for a novice, or sound dangerous to those who have no knowledge of electrics, but just because you are required to have Part P doesn't mean that doing electrics yourself is dangerous if you don't. In some cases, it may be more dangerous having a Part P qualified individual do the work:

Part P of the building regulations scrapped!

For example, I know people who do wiring and electrical testing in industrial buildings - if you do things wrong there, you can potentially kill a great many people. However, those people are not 'qualified' to wire your house. They are trained using the same regs as domestics though, including update courses, they just don't possess the bit of paper that says they can do domestic stuff.

Similar thing with gas regs - some people are qualified to work on huge industrial gas installations with gas pumps and boilers with million BTU output, but are not not allowed to touch the little gas boiler or gas fire in a house.

If you read the example in the above link, you can see why in some cases it's safer to do it yourself if you have the experience, but not necessarily the qualification.

Gary

I have this problem a lot. I'm only 16th edition qualified (but 17th edition trained), since the 17th edition regs were still in the draft stage when I finished my electrical installation course. I did 3 years training in electrical installation. I was top of my class, I even did extra training because I was so much faster than everyone else (I was a complete teacher's pet at college :D). I finished my course and asked If I could move-on to something more intensive, and that got me into electrical engineering. I'm now an electrical & electronic engineer with 6 years of electrical training, but I still get people questioning MY ability; because I'm not Part P. I'm not going to go back to college and pay for a money-making training scheme just to please uninformed customers with a Part P certificate. :censored:

I would never trust anybody else to carry-out electrical work, especially with what I see regularly. Qualifications do not represent knowledge or skill. :censored:

Dan.
 

ufo550

Distinguished Member
I have this problem a lot. I'm only 16th edition qualified (but 17th edition trained), since the 17th edition regs were still in the draft stage when I finished my electrical installation course. I did 3 years training in electrical installation. I was top of my class, I even did extra training because I was so much faster than everyone else (I was a complete teacher's pet at college :D). I finished my course and asked If I could move-on to something more intensive, and that got me into electrical engineering. I'm now an electrical & electronic engineer with 6 years of electrical training, but I still get people questioning MY ability; because I'm not Part P. I'm not going to go back to college and pay for a money-making training scheme just to please uninformed customers with a Part P certificate. :censored:

I would never trust anybody else to carry-out electrical work, especially with what I see regularly. Qualifications do not represent knowledge or skill. :censored:

Dan.

Sorry OP, I just feel obliged to clarify a couple of things.
When you carry out notifiable work in a domestic property (i.e. new circuits, consumer unit change & work in zones in special locations), the local building control (LBC) must be notified;

Part B of the Building Regs, requires certain electrical works to be notified to the LBC. This must be done via one of these three ways;
1) Self certification by a registered competent person
2) Third Part Certification by a registered third party certifier
3) Certification by Building Control.


Other work does not need to be notified to LBC, i.e. additions or alterations to existing circuits.
BS 7671 states that an appropriate certificate should issued, by the installer, when any electrical work has been completed. These certificates gives details of the installer, scope of the work, circuit details & test results. They also comment on the satisfactory condition of the earthing & bonding.

There is no such Part P qualification. There is a C&G Building regs awareness course for electricians, but there is also an 'Electrician’s Guide to the Building Regulations' by the IET, so that electricians can make themselves ofay with the latest building regs, as applicable to them.

For electricians working in the domestic market, the only practicable & business viable way to carry out electrical work, is to join a government approved scheme. These 'schemes' will check the electricians qualifications & suitability. They also check the electricians knowledge, work and testing procedures, public liability insurance, H&S register etc. Membership of a scheme lasts for one year, after which the electrician reapplies and the process is carried out again. Membership fees vary, I'm registered with Elecsa, which is £468.

Whilst many competent electricians, do not agree with the schemes, it's ability to 'police' unqualified electricians, competency, the perceived money making viewpoint, it is what it is. Perhaps the annual fee, detours the unscrupulous and incompetent electricians.

If there was another way to do this, I'm sure no competent electrician would disagree.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
IIRC, all this started when a politicians daughter got electrocuted and died. Until then it wasn't seen as a far reaching problem that needed regulating.

More people die in car accidents every day than people die from electric shock every year, which should put things into perspective, yet they still let people drive cars. According to a TRL report, less than 7% of accidents are caused by speeding (a further 27% caused by other reasons were exacerbated by speed), yet speed cameras are prevalent. If young people are over represented in deaths on the road, they shouldn't be letting them drive until much later, rather than putting up speed cameras.

The USA spends about a trillion dollars a year on anti terrorism, which (other than 2001) averages around 17 deaths a year. Deaths from guns used by non terrorists is in the thousands.

It's a crazy world.

Gary
 

ufo550

Distinguished Member
IIRC, all this started when a politicians daughter got electrocuted and died. Until then it wasn't seen as a far reaching problem that needed regulating.

More people die in car accidents every day than people die from electric shock every year, which should put things into perspective, yet they still let people drive cars. According to a TRL report, less than 7% of accidents are caused by speeding (a further 27% caused by other reasons were exacerbated by speed), yet speed cameras are prevalent. If young people are over represented in deaths on the road, they shouldn't be letting them drive until much later, rather than putting up speed cameras.

The USA spends about a trillion dollars a year on anti terrorism, which (other than 2001) averages around 17 deaths a year. Deaths from guns used by non terrorists is in the thousands.

It's a crazy world.

Gary

I think that is a bit of an urban myth, although that tragic incident took place in October 2004. The statuary requirement to comply with Building Regs Part P, came into effect 1 st January 2005. Our government is good, but not that good to bring in such legislation that quickly.
Poor quality electrical work, does not only lead to a higher risk of electrocution, but also the risk of fire. Here are some facts & figures from the Electrical Safety First for 2010 & 2011/12; Statistics | Electrical Safety First


In January 2015, the 3rd Amendment to BS7671 2008 was issued. One of the amendments will take place 1st January 2016; Consumer units - IET Electrical
The requirement of non combustible consumer units, was instigated, in part by the London Fire Brigades, conducting investigations in a rise in domestic house fires, concluding that a key cause of the fires was substandard cable connections made by the Electrician. These resulted in overheating, which eventually ignited the plastic enclosure. Its a shame the cause of the problem, was not addressed further, rather than just addressing the result.

I cannot give statistics on comparing fatal traffic collisions with electrocution & death caused by house fire caused by substandard electrical work, but any death should & most be avoided.

It seems some people are prepared to 'dabble' in electrics, but would not do so with gas.
 

Geps

Well-known Member
It's a pointless but well intentioned argument to have IMO as I've yet to meet anyone who has enough common sense to dabble in electrics, but not enough to be aware of Part P and the restrictions around what can and can't be done.

By all means continue, but I'd suggest in a dedicated thread so it can fully be fleshed out.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
Fires from electrical connections can even happen in professional installs. I've seen it industrial installs but it usually gets picked up by regular inspections or very early smoke detection apparatus, which you don't usually get in domestic premises.

I also think it's fair to say that more people die from road accidents than from electrocution, and there are far fewer gas appliances than electric.

Gary
 

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