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Answered 2 Routers in the same house vs 1

mistikempire

Active Member
In peoples experiances, how do they favour having a single very good router, compared to a large house hold, having 2 routers on the same network?
 

cjed

Well-known Member
First of all, it's best to clarify the terminology. What people are doing when they use 2 (or more) "routers" is turning the additional router(s) into something called WiFi Access Points (that's the part of a normal domestic WiFi router that provides the WiFi capability). So you have a main WiFi router and additional WiFi Access Points (on different WiFi channels to the main router) that provide improved coverage over a wider area. This will inherently perform better than a single "very good" WiFi router (if such a thing even exists).

That's not to say that there aren't issues with adding Access Points - often client devices will try and "hang onto" the signal from the first access point they connect to, even when moved to where a different access point is providing a better signal. However, this is an issue that can only be addressed with more sophisticated WiFi systems than are normally installed in domestic properties.

I have a centrally placed WiFi router (in a 1970's, 4 bed detached house), plus an additional Access Point in one of the most remote bedrooms - this provides good coverage of the whole house.
 

mistikempire

Active Member
First of all, it's best to clarify the terminology. What people are doing when they use 2 (or more) "routers" is turning the additional router(s) into something called WiFi Access Points (that's the part of a normal domestic WiFi router that provides the WiFi capability). So you have a main WiFi router and additional WiFi Access Points (on different WiFi channels to the main router) that provide improved coverage over a wider area. This will inherently perform better than a single "very good" WiFi router (if such a thing even exists).

That's not to say that there aren't issues with adding Access Points - often client devices will try and "hang onto" the signal from the first access point they connect to, even when moved to where a different access point is providing a better signal. However, this is an issue that can only be addressed with more sophisticated WiFi systems than are normally installed in domestic properties.

I have a centrally placed WiFi router (in a 1970's, 4 bed detached house), plus an additional Access Point in one of the most remote bedrooms - this provides good coverage of the whole house.

I wish someone like you was available in my area to call and come have a look.
What you wrote made so much sense, i learnt more from that post then i did browsing the net for the past hour and a half.

So firstly, id like to say to say thank you for your time and valuable input.

Im a little worried as i wouldnt know how to set up a 2nd router as an access point as im not too kwrotenowledgeable, I was just looking at the Asus RT-AC3200 and the D-Link DIR-890L, which are both very expensive.

However, reading what you wrote, would their be anypoint of spending so much on just one router or instead buy 2x reasonable routers an spread them out.
 

cjed

Well-known Member
First, have a read through the "sticky" thread at the top of this forum called "[FAQ] Using two routers together/ Extending Wi-Fi" which covers the techniques of disabling the "router" features of a second WiFi router to use it as an Access Point. Often people have an old WiFi router lying around because of an upgrade, or change of ISP. If you don't have an old router to re-configure as a WiFi Access Point, you might save yourself some time and trouble and buy a dedicated WiFi Access Point, they're not that expensive.

However, reading what you wrote, would their be any point of spending so much on just one router or instead buy 2x reasonable routers an spread them out.
Indeed. My "main" router is the TalkTalk supplied VDSL "super" router, it has all the features I require (gigabit Ethernet ports, dual band WiFi) and cost me nothing. It's not the best router available, but it has been stable and reliable, and best of all was "free". For my secondary Access Point I use a (now discontinued) WD MyNet N900 WiFi Router, again, it has the features I require (gigabit Ethernet ports, dual band WiFi) and has an option in it's setup to switch it into Access Point mode (which made it really easy to set up). I think it cost me around £30 a few years ago (because it was discontinued).

Usually the tricky part is connecting the two devices (your main router and your Access Point). Ideally you'd use a wired Ethernet cable between the two, but this isn't always convenient (or possible). As a reasonable substitute for a Ethernet cable, it's usually possible to link them using a pair of Powerline adapters (that provides networking over the mains - this is how my Access Point is connected to my main router).
 

mistikempire

Active Member
thank you once again so much for the useful words of wisedom! You have put my mind at rest an im sure after reading the stickies i will understand more an more.

After they take the netgear router back i wont have anything really, so everything is going to be started off with Zero i have the old modem router which came with the internet broadband but its poop, unless if i get fiber obtic they provide me with another to use
 

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