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Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by miniroll171, Nov 19, 2003.

  1. miniroll171

    miniroll171
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    Hi

    I've got a PT100 that I have been very happy with for almost a year. The only thing that I find slightly annoying is that when there is 'FAST' action or camera work, you can't see it very well, almost as if the projector cant project the image fast enough!

    It may be my eyes! or the size of the sceen, or is this a common problem?

    If it is a problem with the projector, do newer more expensive ones handle it better? and if so what tech spec should I look for in a new projector?

    I'm not thinking of upgrading at the moment as I am more then happy with the one I have, but if it ever breaks I might buy a newer one, then pay to have it repaired

    I have tried searching the forum for this but can't seem to find anything on it

    Thanks
    Neal
     
  2. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    Could be down to the encoding of the material.
    May very well be the deinterlacing quality.
     
  3. Jonathan100

    Jonathan100
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    This may well have to do with the DVD itself. I believe that there is a fixed amount of space allocated to each second of film on a dvd into which the action must be packed. Thefore in a fast moving action scene the quality drops to be able to squeeze in all the changes. This problem is therefore visible on all screens though would be reduced by using a smaller screen.

    The other effect may well be your eyes. Fast moving scenes can overwhelm you because of the amount of information being fed to your brain, this always seems to be more noticible when watching film as oppose to moving in real life. In camera pans etc your brain is confused because it views motion, but does not feel it which leads to conflicting senses. On a normal TV your brain is very aware that the motion is only in a small box and the room is stationary, however on a projector your whole wall can appear to be moving.

    This effect can also be noticed in the cinema, particularly the huge multiplexes, if you notice it there it is probably your eyes causing the problem. Motion sickness on a boat is also an indicator.
     
  4. cyberheater

    cyberheater
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    You have to remember that DVD material is tightly compresses/encoded due to the bandwidth/media size limitation.
    This means the most frames being pulled off the DVD only have enough information to detail the difference between that frame and the previous frame. In slow moving scenes without much scene movement, the whole systems keeps up beautifully. On fast moving scenes or movie sequences with a lot of camera changes in a short period of time, the system hasn't got the bandwith to correctly decode all the difference information and the image starts to look undefined and muddy. Until larger format media appears or some miracle encoder/decoder technology comes alone it is unavoidable.
     
  5. DrPepper

    DrPepper
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    Are using HCPC or normal dvd player?
     
  6. MisterBig

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    As well as the points already mentioned there is an issue with the response time of LCD panels. You can tell if this contributes by watching the same scene on a CRT monitor or TV and seeing if you still get the blur.
     
  7. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    I wouldn't worry too much about encoding errors on your average dvd. Its a variable bit rate ( its not fixed per frame at all thats the point).

    If its originated on video it might well be the deinterlacing on the ae100 not being very good ( which it isn't!)

    Broadcast material can suffer from encoding limitations on fast action but again teh deinterlacing on the panny is not all that great for video based material.
     

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