1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

16:9 Wide-Mode Disadvantages?

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by Resonance, Nov 19, 2004.

  1. Resonance

    Resonance
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    The 16:9 wide-mode function works great with my 4:3 TV (Sony KV-DA34M61). DVDs have never looked better with my player (Sony DVP-NS300).

    However, I was just wondering after I came across this...

    "Further, yes, all of the source lines will be scanned by those 4:3 TVs with a so called "16:9 Mode", BUT you are using less of the CRT face, and consequently less phosphors, as compared to a 16:9 model. This means either less light output or more blooming (the blurring that occurs when a CRT is driven too hard) on the 4:3 model as compared to a 16:9 set. So even though we are starting to see a crop of HD 4:3 sets with a 16:9 mode for preserving the resolution of 16:9 formatted DVDs, it is still desirable to have a 16:9 set for the best image possible, and a minimum of black space."

    From http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/qa/qa2001/qa226.html

    What are the detrimental effects (if any) of this squeeze/vertical compression/16:9 wide-mode technology? Any thoughts or information will be much appreciated.
     
  2. red16v

    red16v
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    552
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +5
    I tried to look your tv up on the web to see what kind of spec it has in this respect but it does not seem to give me any answers for the model you list.

    However, in general terms a 4:3 tv is obviously fine for showing 4:3 originated material - but how to show 16:9 material? Easy, you simply reduce the vertical scan height so that the aspect ratio becomes 16:9 - you are still scanning 625 lines (575 in practice of course) Of course you will be using less of the surface of the crt face but it won't result in any loss of picture brightness - and I would not have thought that 'blooming' would be a problem unless you have a really old/duff/faulty set - I think whoever wrote that article was confused. The only advice I would give you is not to leave the tv in 16:9 mode for hours and hours and hours at a time since you will inevitably produce a scan 'burn' at the top and bottom of the 16:9 raster scan (in practice I would not have thought this a problem in a domestic environment). Regards, yt.
     
  3. Resonance

    Resonance
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0

Share This Page

Loading...