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16:9 mode

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Geoffc10, Mar 12, 2002.

  1. Geoffc10

    Geoffc10
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    ok, guys and gals,

    What is the difference between 16:9 and 16:9 true panel on lcd projectors. I was thinking about getting the Sanyo PLV30 but its only got 16:9 mode. I now read about the Panny AE1000 with true 16:9. Which is better, and what would i be missing picture wise on a 16:9 screen??.
     
  2. nigel_williams

    nigel_williams
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    I'm no expert on Sanyo but I think the panel on the projector is 4:3 format, 800x600 therefore 16x9 mode only.

    The Panasonic has a 16:9 format 858x484 LCD panel so the full 484 lines can be used for picture information.
     
  3. LV426

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    People's perception of size is determined more by height than by width. For example, a person's head which just fits into a 4:3 picture will be the same size as the same head on a 16x9 or wider picture, provided the picture's height is the same.

    In order to fit a 16x9 image into a 4x3 panel, you have to reduce the image height. That is what 16x9 MODE does. Depending on your screen setup and the zoom abilities on the projector, this may mean that 16x9 images are "smaller" (by the above definition) than 4x3 ones. Or, of course you could always zoom the image up to the same height.

    Which brings me to the second and more important point. It's more important because most movies (and DVDs) have aspect ratios wider than 4:3.

    When your 4x3 panel is used to show a 16x9 image, only part of the height of the panel is in use - ie a band across the middle. The top and bottom are occupied by black space. This means that only, say, two thirds of the pixels on the panel are in active use. Therefore definition is lower and/or the chicken-wire is more visible (especially if you zoom it up to compensate for the smaller height).

    On a true 16x9 panel, there is always a 4:3 mode, which adds black bars to the left and right of the 16x9 image.

    This makes both 4x3 and 16x9 images the same "size" (by which I mean, height), without needing zooming. And without any zooming, the size of the chicken wire doesn't increase.

    To put it another way - think about the number of pixels used to make up your picture (where more is better):

    On a 4x3 panel with a million pixels (say):

    a 4x3 image will use the full million
    a 16x9 image will use 750,000.
    a 22x9 image will use 545,000

    On a 16x9 panel with a million pixels:

    a 4x3 image will use 750,000
    a 16x9 image will use 1,000,000
    a 22x9 image will use 727,000

    In other words - better use of pixels overall on widescreen material.
     
  4. gavan

    gavan
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    A 'true' 16:9 projector has a panel which is actually shaped with that aspect ratio.

    16:9 mode on a 4:3 projector means that the projector can accept an anamorphic 16:9 signal and letterbox it for display on a 4:3 panel.


    With two panels of equal resolution but different aspect ratios, the 16:9 panel would give a higher resolution and brighter picture on 16:9 sources. The 4:3 panel would be superior for 4:3 sources.

    However, in this case thats not the full story. The panasonic is 16:9 but rather low resolution - 858x484. If you do the sums, an 800x600 panel (which is what the Sanyo has?) will use 800x450 when letterboxing 16:9 material so there's not that great of a difference in terms of resolution.

    Less of the 4:3 PJs overall brightness can be utilised though, as you've got letterbox bars 'blacking out' about 25% of the screen area. You also have to consider that the slightly grey letterbox bars (as found on LCD units) can detract from the viewing experience, though they are much less aggravating than letterbox on a 4:3 TV IMO. You'll still get letterbox on 2.35:1 material even on the 16:9 panel too, of course.


    Gav
     

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