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1080p 37" LCD - any available?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Legal Eagle, Feb 26, 2005.

  1. Legal Eagle

    Legal Eagle
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    Does anyone know whether there is an LCD TV available in the UK which supports 1080p (1920 x 1080) - preferably with a terrestrial digital tuner.

    I am aware that the Sharp Aquos 45" supports 1080p and has a 'Freeview' tuner - but the 37" models in the range only support 1080i or 780p. A 45" panel would be too large for my Living room.

    I appreciate that 1080p transmissions are a long way off, but the signs are that the new HD-DVD or Blu-Ray will support the highest HDTV standard.

    So - are there any (or does anyone know if any are planned)?
     
  2. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Yep - 1080/50p and 1080/60p transmissions may be a while off, but it is entirely possible that HD-DVD and BluRay may be able to deliver 24p/25p source material (like most feature films) in 1080/24p or 1080/25p form rather than interlacing to 1080/60i (with 3:2) or 1080/50i.

    It is also important to differentiate between "compatible with" and "native resolution".

    LCD, DLP and (nearly) all Plasmas only display progressively. They have a native progressive resolution. This could be 850x480, 1280x720, 1920x1080, 1366x768, 1920x1200 (not 16:9 in this case)

    Only a 1920x1080 display will display a 1920x1080i or 1920x1080p source with a 1:1 line/sample to display pixel relationship.

    However 1280x720 and 1366x768 HD panels (and 850x480 SD panels for that matter), will often be 1080i, 1080p, 720p, 480p, 480i, 576i, and 576p compatible. All this means is that if you feed them with one of these input standards they will display a scaled version of that image, if it isn't in their native resolution. Just because a display is "1080i" compatible it doesn't mean it has the capability to display 1080i in full-resolution.

    This is further confused by 1080i source material not having the same vertical resolution as 1080p source material. This is because interlaced material is filtered (either "in camera" as part of the line-averaging scanning that converts the progressive CCD capture to interlaced video, or by vertical filtering of film transferred images) to reduce interline flicker at the frame rate (i.e. half the field rate)

    In reality it is widely accepted that vertically 1080i sources have roughly the same resolution as 720p - even though 1080i sounds much higher res. This is why 720p and 1080i are close rivals, and 720 line displays are deemed "HD ready" for both 720p and 1080i sources.

    However horizontally 1080i is often delivered with 1920 samples, whilst 720p only usually has 1280 samples. Thus a 1080i signal displayed on a 1280x720, 1366x768 etc. panel will not be using the full horizontal resolution of the signal.

    To fully resolve all the horizontal detail in a 1080i full-resolution broadcast you will need a 1920x1080 panel - i.e. 1080p (as 1080i panels don't really exist - only CRTs and a few odd-ball plasmas use interlacing)

    Whilst interlaced 1080i sources won't exploit the full vertical resolution of the panel, unlike 1080p sources which will, they WILL potentially exploit the full horizontal resolution, and thus look better on 1920x1080 panels than 1280x720 or 1366x768 devices.
     
  3. Rimmer

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    As far as I know only the 45" Sharp LCDs are 1080p. Westinghouse Digital announced at CES that all its forthcoming LCDs 37" and larger will be 1080p (available in the US in Q3 2005). No word of a UK release date though.

    Something to remember when shopping for a 1080p display is that even though the panel has 1920 x 1080p resolution it may not accept 1920 x 1080p inputs. In the US there are two 45" 1080p Sharp LCDs, one with a separate tuner box, and one with the tuner box built into the TV. The model with the tuner box will not accept 1080p via DVI from the tuner box, but it will accept 1080p if you bypass the tuner box and connect directly to the panel. The model with the tuner built into the panel will not accept 1080p at all. The UK Sharp 1080p LCD panel has a separate tuner box so I imagine it probably does accept 1080p via DVI-HDCP by connecting directly to the panel (I'm only guessing though).

    If you want a 1080p panel that is compatible with the forthcoming DVD formats (and 1080p PC and scaler inputs) my advice would be to wait until HD-DVD launches towards the end of the year. By that time there should be more 1080p panels available, and there should be plenty of information available about which displays can accept and display 1080p.
     
  4. Legal Eagle

    Legal Eagle
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    Thanks guys - that's very helpful. I will remain patient and wait.
     
  5. pwood

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    Best of luck! I wish Nicoret would start producing HDTV craving supressors :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: I'd be the first in line.
     
  6. thegeby

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    Just to note, There will not almost certainly not be any 1080p transmissions, that can be picked up by a present digital terrestial tuner. The bandwidth required does not fit in an analogue channel, which will be the limiting factor for some time to come. It is much more likely that we will use a more efficient MPEG4/VC-1 type compression for all HD, i.e. new tuners would be required.

    In practice the important thing is to ensure that your 1080p tv monitor can accept HDMI or DVI/HDCP inputs.
     
  7. Legal Eagle

    Legal Eagle
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    Yes, thanks, I know that. Are there many sets with DVI inputs that don't support HDCP? It is often difficult to tell from the specifications.
     
  8. Stephen Neal

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    There are certainly quite a few. DVI without HDCP is used for PC to Monitor connections. I suspect that older models are less likely to have HDCP - as it is only relatively recently that HDCP has become as significant.
     

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