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100Hz technology

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
Yes - to verious degrees. Mostly depends on the manufactuer, and how they've implemented the feature.

100/120hz isn't just repeating the same frame twice, but making new frames to put between the real ones, its far more complicated then it sounds and some brands like Sharp gave the tech a poor name.

Toshiba, Panasonic and others have done a great job of their interpolation techniques. Its best to read several reviews of any set your intrested in getting.
 
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Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
I know what it is and i know what it does but my question is does it really make that much of a difference
Side by side with a 60Hz LCD watching a dvd or playing 360 can you really tell??

I'm concidering taking mine back in exchange if the difference is conciderably noticeable

Thanks in advance



It all depends on your content/source

and 100-480Hz (MCFI) is only needed for 60fps (console) gaming, and maybe sports depending on panel tech


For DVD movies and Sky, there's no need for it.
 

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
Its great for sports, smooths out the motion and reduces the blur of something like a football getting booted across the screen.

I've got a Toshiba Z series and it works great for everything. The motion is very natural.

Another aspect of 100/120hz tech is its really a requirement for true 24p movie playback using 5:5 pulldown, but if your after this you do need to check the spec of the set your getting, don't just assume...
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
Most games on the X360 and PS3 are rendered at 30fps. As far as I'm aware COD series are only (fast paced) 60fps games on the X360 and PS3.

So if you are a die-hard fan of those games, than MCFI (100/120Hz is a must).
 
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Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
Its great for sports, smooths out the motion and reduces the blur of something like a football getting booted across the screen.

I've got a Toshiba Z series and it works great for everything. The motion is very natural.
When it comes to SD, quality de-interlacing is far more important than MCFI

Another aspect of 100/120hz tech is its really a requirement for true 24p movie playback using 5:5 pulldown, but if your after this you do need to check the spec of the set your getting, don't just assume...

Actually, no.
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
So really the main difference is in sports??
It just stops bluring on fast objects??

As I've said above, quality de-interlacing is a must for direct SD source as it can cause various motion and image artifacts if done incorrectly.


PS: The main difference is in fast-paced 60fps First Person Shooting games. That's where you'll notice the blur most due to panning.
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
the one you have atm, series 5, is the low-end of Samsung's 1080p range, where the series 6 can be considered as mid-range.

So you will notice improvement in picture quality (not just motion), but it's over-priced and too expensive tbh.
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
disable all form of noise reduction, film mode and movie plus

If that doesn't solve the issue, it's the DVD. Sometime they use noise reduction to reduce the noise levels.
 
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sjw

Prominent Member
How can I tell when the TV is actually in its 100Hz mode?
Whenever I select the 'i' button from an external source it says either 1920x1080 @ 60Hz for a high res mpg or 1920x1080 @ 24Hz for blu-ray (both from PS3).
My TV is the Samsung 756.
I have the TV in 'standard' mode. Can't believe anybody would put it in 'sport' mode and not burn their retinas..
So, when is it displaying 100Hz? When watching Terrestrial?
 

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
Another aspect of 100/120hz tech is its really a requirement for true 24p movie playback using 5:5 pulldown, but if your after this you do need to check the spec of the set your getting, don't just assume...


Actually, no.


Intresting statement, last I checked 24hz X5 = 120hz, but maybe you'd care to elaborate.
 

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
There are non-MCFI sets that process 24p using 2:2 (48Hz) and 3:3 pull-down (72Hz)

...and some that can do 96hz (4:4), but for the most part the're rare, maybe point out some LCD sets currently on the market and we'll talk further on it.
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
Noise reduction??
To prevent ghosting??

You'll have to forgive me, you know alot more than me and i'm relatively new to this

Noise reduction is used to reduce image artifacts such as microblocking, film grain, analogue noise etc...

Some forms of noise reduction can cause trailing (after images) if set too high.

Here's an example

videonoise0ny7.jpg
 

Nielo TM

Distinguished Member
...and some that can do 96hz (4:4), but for the most part the're rare, maybe point out some LCD sets currently on the market and we'll talk further on it.

and not all 120Hz sets actually process 24p properly

120Hz doesn't automatically mean 5:5
 

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
and not all 120Hz sets actually process 24p properly

120Hz doesn't automatically mean 5:5

I'd agree with that...

...infact I already had:

Another aspect of 100/120hz tech is its really a requirement for true 24p movie playback using 5:5 pulldown, but if your after this you do need to check the spec of the set your getting, don't just assume...

Seems your bent on disagreeing with me no matter what, lol
 

Lambo mad

Established Member
Noise reduction is used to reduce image artifacts such as microblocking, film grain, analogue noise etc...

Some forms of noise reduction can cause trailing (after images) if set too high.

I don't have a noise reduction setting

Oddly enough it's not a constant ghosting it's only when there's either a highly detailed background with movement past it or vertical lines like blinds with a person walking past
 

Lunar Wolf

Established Member
I don't have a noise reduction setting

Oddly enough it's not a constant ghosting it's only when there's either a highly detailed background with movement past it or vertical lines like blinds with a person walking past

Check your user manual, page 21 under 'Digital NR', the equvilant setting on my Toshiba caused all sorts of funkyness while watching movies (both DVD & BD) i found it was best switched off.
 

V1CAR

Established Member
would sony w4500 with 100hz look alot better than w4000 when watching football on sky hd? :D
 

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