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100hz problems

Discussion in 'TVs' started by ricke, May 22, 2002.

  1. ricke

    ricke
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    I've been thinking about getting a 100hz set but browsing the boards i get the feeling that there are some problems out there.

    I'm a novice to this, but I would of thought the picture would be better on a 100 hz set ? higher frequency (higher number ;))

    Can anyone explain why this it not the case or how the problems (artefacts:confused: :confused: )etc occur ?

    Thanks and regards

    RickE
     
  2. Guest

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    As I understand it, it's like computers.

    100hz is better than 50hz. It's faster.

    If you had a choice - would you buy a Pentium 50 or a Pentium 100?
     
  3. ricke

    ricke
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    the bigger the better ;) ;) ...........that's what I thought.......but I think there maybe more to it.....any techies out there to explain it ?

    Thanks and Regards

    RickE
     
  4. bob007

    bob007
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    50/100htz refresh rates.

    Not a techie, but know...

    If you are susceptible to the 50htz flicker you will benefit from a 100htz set

    Most of the artifacts that get mentioned are misconstrued, as it's the quality of the braodcasts that are crap and the owners switching on all the digital enhancements the set offers.

    Have had 100htz sets for for a number of years and find i have no problem with artifacts, through Sky digital/ DVD.

    bob
     
  5. ricke

    ricke
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    What exactly is an "artifact ??" Is it when a picture goes blocky in some areas (like it does on my digital camcorder sometimes) ??
    and are there different types of artifacts ??

    Also. wouldn't the digital enhancements make the picture better rather than worse ? ?
     
  6. Doubledoom

    Doubledoom
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    That is indeed one type of artefact. Quite commonly seen on skydigital etc. Many blame 100hz sets for this when it is not. However, a high contrast/brightness setting with incorrectly set DNR options will mean that a 100hz is more likely to make the artefacts more obvious than a 50hz set.

    There have been tons of threads on this. A search may prove useful to you.

    A basic summary of them all would be that 100hz or 50hz is a very personal thing.

    If you sit close up 50hz could be better, if you sit far back 100hz could be better. If you see 50hz flicker or hear televisions whine or get headaches if you watch tv too much, then 100hz would be better. If you like high brightness/contrast settings 50hz may be better.

    Best of all, take a look for yourself remembering the above.
     
  7. Squirrel God

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    I'd emphasise what doubledoom has said by saying that it really does depend on the individual set as much as your individual preferences. I can sit very close to my Sony LS60 and it's great. And I can turn the contrast up to full as well :) Even if you don't notice the flicker on a 50Hz set, you will be impressed by the stability and clarity of a (good) 100Hz set.

    Would definitely agree here! :) You can't really buy a TV without checking it out in the flesh first anyway!!

    Finally, just to clarify, the Hz number (50 or 100) refers to the amount of times the screen is updated (refreshed) per second. So, 50Hz means 50 times per second, 100Hz means 100 times per second. (Actually, it's 50 and 100 half frames per second, but we won't go into that..... you can find out by searching this forum and the Web).

    Good luck :)
     
  8. ricke

    ricke
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    Thanks guys, I'll do a search and get some more info.....:blush: :blush: Might be back with some more questions though.....
     
  9. auk2222

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    Hi Ricky,

    I have been following the threads on this subject. I decided to post you some advice (for what it is worth).

    In layman’s terms, large screen TVs have to scan a larger screen the same number of times per second as a smaller TV, to reproduce a picture. Because the screen is that much larger and each line scanned is longer, most people can perceive an unpleasant flicker, particularly on fast moving scenes. For this reason 100 Hz sets try to overcome this phenomenon by scanning the screen twice as often in the same time as a 50 Hz set. It cures the flicker but introduces a new set of phenomena, which some people may find disconcerting.

    This is where it becomes subjective. If you look very carefully at a 100Hz TV picture you can notice some unnatural occurrences on the picture such as a slight after image on an object moving rapidly horizontally of diagonally on the screen. There are other things that you might see if you go looking for it such as slightly jagged edges on curved objects etc. If you look for problems you will see them but average normal people will not find themselves losing any sleep over it. My own TV……Its 100 Hz (32”) and I am very pleased with the performance, accepting the above known phenomena.

    If I may just give some general advice about “ Digital” enhancements… They are usually Digital circuits to overcome some inadequacy in the TV chassis or the broadcast system. Some are useful and some are the brainchild of over stressed design engineers trying desperately dream up new features for what is basically a 40-50 year old invention. This keeps the marketing men happy as they can then use the word “ Digital” all over the features list for their telly. Digital seems to be the buzzword that replaces the equally misused “Turbo” in the late 80s.Only YOU can decide if the feature is a necessary function or not, but from my point of view, I would rather they spent my money on a good picture, good sound and reliability!

    Enough of my ranting….. Go view the TVs for yourself and take your time to choose. Don’t let the sales person talk you into spending a lot more than you need to on useless gadgets that off minimal impact on the primary function of your TV.
    :blush:
     
  10. ricke

    ricke
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    had a good look around the boards for previous posts and it seems pretty much 50:50, shhmaybe slightly positive towards the 100hz...........I think I'll take the plunge and go for a 100hz set when I finally decide which set to buy.
     
  11. Squirrel God

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    Good lad! Note the dates however, earlier 100Hz sets were worse. Note the models people are talking about as well, some models are very bad (JVC have got consistently poor reviews for their 100Hz sets for example). Note that often the problem is not with 100Hz per se but with the digital processing that accompanies it on the set (as noted by auk2222).

    All the best with it :)
     

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