“Too many USB devices connected to PS5” error - help/advice appreciated, thanks!

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
Hi all,

Merry Christmas but not so much for my son. :(

Almost a year to the day he got his PS5, my son’s console decided to break down yesterday. His PS5 displays the message in the title, keeps lagging and very slow to respond from the menu stage. Games are next to unplayable.

I didn’t buy any extended warranty from retailer (Currys) so the standard 1 year warranty has expired as I bought it 19th November 2020.

As you do, I googled online for solutions and have tried all the tips to no avail:


They are all variations of what is detailed in the above link.

The penultimate resort was a hard factory reset but I still got the same “too many USBs” message after resetting it to factory default.

What’s worse is that when I connect controller via supplied USB cable to set up PS5 after system reset, there is now no response at all! :(

I’m going to hopefully borrow another cable to try - in case it’s the faulty cable rationale - but I think it’s actually the PS5 itself as the message pops up without any USB cable or USB devices connected to the console. It could be a fault on the PS5 USB port as Googling online suggests.

The last step is to get Sony to repair the PS5 but I have no experience of this. Any suggestions on the best way to contact Sony to repair PS5? Should I do it through Currys? I’ve no idea how much it will cost either.

Any feedback is appreciated, thank you.
 

lee667

Distinguished Member
I'd ring Sony and quote the consumer rights act / sales of goods act and ask them to fix it free of charge given its barely a year old.
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
I'd ring Sony and quote the consumer rights act / sales of goods act and ask them to fix it free of charge given its barely a year old.

I’ve sent a message to Sony via twitter.
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
I'd ring Sony and quote the consumer rights act / sales of goods act and ask them to fix it free of charge given its barely a year old.

I’ve just been reading up on the consumer rights act but struggling to find the part that will help me argue the case for the PS5 to be repaired outside of 1 year warranty. Its essentially just over 13 months since the purchase was made from Currys.

Can anyone help with which parts of consumer law could be used to argue for a free repair given the above? Thanks.

edit - is it the part about lasting a reasonable time - which could be up to 6 years under normal use?
 

lee667

Distinguished Member
I’ve just been reading up on the consumer rights act but struggling to find the part that will help me argue the case for the PS5 to be repaired outside of 1 year warranty. Its essentially just over 13 months since the purchase was made from Currys.

Can anyone help with which parts of consumer law could be used to argue for a free repair given the above? Thanks.

edit - is it the part about lasting a reasonable time - which could be up to 6 years under normal use?

Yeah, that bit as it should last longer than just over a year. To be honest I wouldn't be surprised if they just took it back and not charge.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Yes the liability is with Currys and not Sony. It’s not fit for purpose as your would reasonably expect a premium product such as this to last considerably longer than 12 months, probably as much as the six year limit.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The problem is that the onus is on you to prove the issue was aparent with the product when you initially purchased it. THis is where the manufacturers warranty gives you more chance of getting a repair done for free or even a replacement. The warranty is basically a gentlemen's agreement issued by a manufacturer that basically says that they are less likely to contest most reasonable claims you make within the period set aside for the warranty.

If trying to persue this outside of that warranty, you need to be talking to the retailer you bought the goods from and it would be them you'd be taking to a small claims court if they were not willing to accept the product had the fault when you purchased it from them.

Is there's any evidence out there that indicates that the issue you've had is inherent to PS5s and caused by substandard components, poor manufacturing or anything that may have been implemented at the point of manufacture or prior to you buying the product?

The consumer rights act of 2015 implies the following:


  • Satisfactory quality Goods shouldn't be faulty or damaged when you receive them. You should ask what a reasonable person would consider satisfactory for the goods in question. For example, bargain-bucket products won’t be held to as high standards as luxury goods.

One aspect of a product being of satisfactory quality is durability, in other words how long it lasts. I'd suggest this would be reason for a small claims court hearing in your case.

Durability takes into account many different factors like product type, brand reputation, price point and how it is advertised. For example you're unlikely to be able to claim a cheap kettle that's stopped working after four years isn't durable. Whereas a more premium and expensive kettle that's been well looked after and has stopped working after 14 months could be considered to not be durable, and therefore not of satisfactory quality.

Your rights under the Consumer Rights Act are against the retailer – the company that sold you the product – not the manufacturer, so you must take any claim to the retailer.

You have up to six years to take a claim to the small claims court for faulty goods in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and five years in Scotland.

This doesn't mean that a product has to last six years - just that you have this length of time in which to make a claim if a retailer refuses to repair or replace a faulty product.

Push as hard as you can to try get Sony to deal with this under warranty despite the warranty expiring. Taking the small claims route against a retailer ain't no walk in the park and the law is more than likely to be on the retailers side. How are you going to prove that the issue you have is due to an inherant issue that was apparent when you bought the console and it would be down to the court to determine the satisfactory quality element and whether it would be a retailers responsiblity to deal with this 13 months post purchase?

Threatening Sony with the consumer rights act will get you no where unless you purchased the console directly from them. THe rights you have apply to the retailer who sold you the console and not the manufacturer.
 
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bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
The problem is that the onus is on you to prove the issue was aparent with the product when you initially purchased it. THis is where the manufacturers warranty gives you more chance of getting a repair done for free or even a replacement. The warranty is basically a gentlemen's agreement issued by a manufacturer that basically says that they are less likely to contesnmost reasonable claims you make within the period set aside for the warranty.

If trying to persue this outside of that warranty, you need to be talking to the retailer you bought the goods from and it would be them you'd be taking to a small claims court if they were not willing to accept the product had the fault when you purchased it from them.

Is there's any evidence out there that indicates that the issue you've had is inherent to PS5s and caused by substandard components, poor manufacturing or anything that may have been implemented at the point of manufacture or prior to you buying the product?

The consumer rights act of 2015 implies the following:


  • Satisfactory quality Goods shouldn't be faulty or damaged when you receive them. You should ask what a reasonable person would consider satisfactory for the goods in question. For example, bargain-bucket products won’t be held to as high standards as luxury goods.

One aspect of a product being of satisfactory quality is durability, in other words how long it lasts. I'd suggest this would be reason for a small claims court hearing in your case.

Durability takes into account many different factors like product type, brand reputation, price point and how it is advertised. For example you're unlikely to be able to claim a cheap kettle that's stopped working after four years isn't durable. Whereas a more premium and expensive kettle that's been well looked after and has stopped working after 14 months could be considered to not be durable, and therefore not of satisfactory quality.

Your rights under the Consumer Rights Act are against the retailer – the company that sold you the product – not the manufacturer, so you must take any claim to the retailer.

You have up to six years to take a claim to the small claims court for faulty goods in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and five years in Scotland.

This doesn't mean that a product has to last six years - just that you have this length of time in which to make a claim if a retailer refuses to repair or replace a faulty product.

Push as hard as you can to try get Sony to deal with this under warranty despite the warranty expiring. Taking the small claims route against a retailer ain't no walk in the park and the law is more than likely to be on the retailers side. How are you going to prove that the issue you have is due to an inherant issue that was apparent when you bought the console and it would be down to the court to determine the satisfactory quality element and whether it would be a retailers responsiblity to deal with this 13 months post purchase?

Threatening Sony with the consumer rights act will get you no where unless you purchased the console directly from them. THe rights you have apply to the retailer who sold you the console and not the manufacturer.

Thanks @dante01

I did send an initial message via Twitter to Sony but this was before the suggestions of using consumer rights law as an argument.

I was going to put forward my case to Currys using the satisfactory quality/durability argument and see what their response is.

Is the fact that there are videos and articles online about the issue that I’ve posted not prove this is a common problem with PS5 consoles? We’ve had a ps4 for several years now and this has not happened.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
You'd ideally need someone with a recognised electrical engineering qualification to write something that substantiates this so that you'd be able to submit it at a small claims court hearing. It would be even better if they could appear as a witness. If you need to pay for this then this can be claimed from the defendants as expenses, but you'd only be awarrd costs if you win the case.


You could write a report yourself, but this is obviously not going to be regarded as having the same kind of credence as evidence provided by an indepent qualified witness.


What sort of evidence should you obtain?

If you are in dispute with a trader over a contract for the supply of goods, a service or digital content, it is essential that you obtain and retain as much evidence as you can to prove your claim. The following tips will be useful:

  • depending on the type of goods, services and digital content supplied and where the contract is made, the trader may be required to give you certain important information, such as the contract details, payment arrangements, delivery, after-sales service and details of any complaints-handling policy they may have. This information will be a useful guide to what evidence you need to gather
  • keep a folder of all other relevant documents, such as the original advertisement (if applicable), your order, acknowledgement / confirmation of order, the credit agreement (if applicable), any plans the receipt, emails, correspondence and any guarantee or warranty
  • write down a statement of events in chronological order and keep it updated
  • make a note of the names of the people you contacted about your dispute and their role within the business
  • where appropriate, take photographs or videos of the problem - for example, the faulty goods, bad workmanship or below-standard holiday accommodation
  • make a list of sub-standard work and a list of any outstanding work
  • if you are returning goods after cancelling a contract, consider taking photographs or videos to demonstrate the goods had not been handled beyond what was necessary to establish their nature, characteristics and function
  • for digital content, take a screen print on your PC or laptop, or use another device to take a video of the screen as evidence of the problem
  • if there is a witness to the problem or event, ask them if they will give you a written account as supporting evidence
  • check online review sites - you may find someone else with a similar complaint this could support what you are stating
  • keep any parts or materials that are removed or replaced; you may need them as evidence of the fault at a later date
  • if you have had remedial work done by another trader, ask for an itemised bill or better still ask them to write a report for you on the work they carried out and the reasons why it was necessary
  • obtain a valuation on the work done by the trader to date
  • keep a record of and receipts for your out-of-pocket expenses; you may be able to claim them back
  • keep the packaging and instructions for use; they may be useful
  • if you write to the trader, keep the certificate of posting or recorded delivery slip
  • If you email the trader, keep auto-replies and read-receipts if you receive any
  • the trader may have an online reporting form that you can use to submit your complaint. You may receive an email confirming what you have submitted, which is evidence of your complaint
  • if a trader supplies you with digital content that damages your device (such as your mobile phone or laptop) or it causes damage to other digital content, which would not have occurred if the trader had taken reasonable care, gather evidence on your loss to claim repairs or compensation

If a trader gives you false information about the goods, service or digital content, the overall presentation of the goods, service or digital content is misleading or they use an aggressive commercial practice (such as pressure selling) you may need to obtain extra evidence you can use when making your claim - for example:

  • details of what you expected and evidence of what you actually got. For example, if you chose a trader because they advertised that they were a member of a trade association and this turned out not to be true, you should keep a copy of the advertisement and obtain written confirmation from the trade association that the trader is not a member
  • if you were misled into entering a contract because of false information in a leaflet or on the trader's website, keep the leaflet as evidence, print or take a screenshot of the relevant page on the website
  • if you sold goods to a trader and you agreed to a below-market price because they lied to you about their quality, you should obtain the correct market price of the goods and have evidence of the price the trader gave you
  • if you signed a contract because a trader refused to leave your home until you went ahead and agreed to the contract, keep a detailed written record of the incident to use as evidence
  • details of any financial losses that you suffered as a result of a payment you made to the trader as you may be able to claim damages. You may also be entitled to claim compensation for alarm, distress, physical inconvenience or discomfort caused to you.

Expert opinions: what you need to know

If the trader does not accept any of the evidence you present in support of your claim and you remain in dispute, you may need to obtain an expert opinion to establish what the problem is, how it was caused, what it will take to sort out the problem and who is to blame.

Initially, you may able to obtain the opinion of another trader that provides the same goods, service or digital content as the trader you are in dispute with. The second trader may be able to offer you guidance so that you can approach the first trader with some knowledge to back up your claim. However, not all traders will be prepared to get involved in a dispute.

If the trader you are in dispute with is a member of a trade association, part of that trade association's service may be to offer conciliation or arbitration, including an expert's examination and report paid for on a 'loser pays' basis.

You may be able to come to an agreement with the trader to obtain a joint independent report, perhaps splitting the cost so that you can both be satisfied about the impartiality of the opinion. Of course, the trader does not have to agree to this, but if you make this request in writing and the trader rejects it, they may find it difficult to argue later that they have acted reasonably.

If you obtain your own independent report, you should inform the trader in writing of your intentions before you go ahead. Keep copies of all your correspondence. If the report finds in your favour, you may be able to claim back the cost of the report as well as having the problem sorted out or claiming the cost of rectification.

The limit on the amount you can claim in the 'small claims track' of the County Court is £10,000. The court may not accept a report you have obtained prior to taking legal action and may direct you and the trader to appoint a single expert. If you and the trader cannot agree on the choice of expert or the arrangements for paying the expert's fee, then you or the trader must apply to the court for further directions. The court would then make a decision about the expert. The limit for recovering expert's fees in court is £750.

The 'Writing an effective letter of complaint' guide includes a template letter to a trader asking them to consider a joint expert report.

Where can you find an expert?

Sometimes it can be difficult to find an independent expert so you should contact the Citizens Advice consumer service for guidance. Check the trader's advertisements, website, emails and business documents to see if they claim to be a member of a trade association. If they are, contact the trade association consumer helpline for advice on how to complain about a member. If you are not sure whether the trader is a member of a trade association, see the 'Trade associations & regulatory bodies' guide, which has a list of contact details for some of the main associations. You can also research trade associations online.

If you find it difficult to get an independent opinion, consider using alternative dispute resolution as a way to resolve your complaint without going to court (the 'Thinking of suing in court' guide explains what this means). Evidence you have obtained so far will be useful to your case.

What should the expert's report contain?

You should make sure that your expert includes the following in their report:

  • a full breakdown of the nature of the problem
  • what is the cause or likely cause of the problem and why - for example, bad workmanship, inherent defect, faulty components
  • what needs to be done to put the problem right
  • the cost of corrective work
  • if relevant, photographs, diagrams, plans, etc should also be included
  • the person giving the opinion should also give details of their qualifications, credentials and experience
  • a statement of truth verifying the report

If you are not sure about obtaining a report, ask the expert to show you an example of the type of reports they produce. Always find out how much the report will cost, bearing in mind the £750 limit on recovering expert's costs in court.

 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
I am going to disagree on some of @dante01 points it's a good post but coming from the wrong angle in this case :)

The problem is that the onus is on you to prove the issue was aparent with the product when you initially purchased it.

Only if you pursue a fault claim

If you go down this route, you do not have to

Fit for purpose The goods should be fit for the purpose they are supplied for, as well as any specific purpose you made known to the retailer before you agreed to buy the goods.

A premium games console should last more than 13 months and its very common to use this route.

They don't need to accept there was a fault at the onset when you bought it and that's the key difference in claiming this route.

Taking the small claims route against a retailer ain't no walk in the park and the law is more than likely to be on the retailers side. How are you going to prove that the issue you have is due to an inherant issue that was apparent when you bought the console and it would be down to the court to determine the satisfactory quality element and whether it would be a retailers responsiblity to deal with this 13 months post purchase?

It can be all electronic these days, if Curry's don't respond its an automatic win.

You'd ideally need someone with a recognised electrical engineering qualification to write something that substantiates this so that you'd be able to submit it at a small claims court hearing. It would be even better if they could appear as a witness. If you need to pay for this then this can be claimed from the defendants as expenses, but you'd only be awarrd costs if you win the case.

You are making it far too complicated this route and over the top. :nono:


The basic argument for the OP has paid £500 for a premium games console, it has been used as normal (assuming you haven't dropped it etc) and any reasonable person would expect it to last at least 5 years (or a suitable number). The fact it has only lasted 13 months means that is not fit for purpose and you asking Currys to repair\replace.

If you follow this page for guidance on how the small claims work.


I would be interested in how Currys could defend that

Currys defence would be limited to well it should only last 12 months, in which case a mediator\judge would rule in the OP favour as that's completely unreasonable.

The warranty is basically a gentlemen's agreement issued by a manufacturer that basically says that they are less likely to contest most reasonable claims you make within the period set aside for the warranty.

No it actually forms part of the conditions of sale and there are consequences if a warranty claim is not met.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Currys could simply say that the issue is a result of misuse or the manner in which the owner has used the product? If you've no evidence to sugest otherwise then why is the owner's word any more important than that of the retailer? The judge is unlikely to be versed in such matters, hence why independent experts are called upon to write a report or submit evidence.

I'd at least seek advice from Citizens Advice as to whether or not to provide independant evidence rather than concluding none is required in order to win the case.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Currys could simply say that the issue is a result of misuse or the manner in which the owner has used the product? If you've no evidence to sugest otherwise then why is the owner's word any more important than that of the retailer? The judge is unlikely to be versed in such matters, hence why independent experts are called upon to write a report or submit evidence.

I'd at least seek advice from Citizens Advice as to whether or not to provide independant evidence rather than concluding none is required in order to win the case.

No they can’t or rather they would have to provide evidence to show that misuse has occurred in this case unless there was obvious damage then they would have to provide an engineers report.

It’s the consumer rights act, not the retailers act.

Again going down the getting engineer report route in this case would be the wrong way, the fit for purpose route is the better way. The judge will certainly understand that.

By all means talk to CAB but look though the posts over the years to see what people have done
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Moved to GC specifically to assist with the claim aspect
 

aVdub

Banned
currys dont even like honouring their own warrantys let alone something out of warranty

TBF Currys rang me when I was travelling by train to inform me that I didn't fill out the extended warranty.....

And then rung me back when we came out of the tunnel to tell me that they had filled in the details and my claim will be accepted on the Nikon camera.



-------------------------------------------------------------

On a bike I bought I have several spokes pop at the nipples and mentioned this to the LBS I bought the bike from, who replied that it was out of warranty for the wheels, but when I suggested I dig around and find out if this is a known issue, they replied that that might work.

A week later I supplied the video's and claims from the States about the wheels having alloy nipples into stainless spokes and their lack of strength and Specialized agreed and replaced the wheels.

An independent engineers report at your own expense is not always required.
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
TBF Currys rang me when I was travelling by train to inform me that I didn't fill out the extended warranty.....

And then rung me back when we came out of the tunnel to tell me that they had filled in the details and my claim will be accepted on the Nikon camera.



-------------------------------------------------------------

On a bike I bought I have several spokes pop at the nipples and mentioned this to the LBS I bought the bike from, who replied that it was out of warranty for the wheels, but when I suggested I dig around and find out if this is a known issue, they replied that that might work.

A week later I supplied the video's and claims from the States about the wheels having alloy nipples into stainless spokes and their lack of strength and Specialized agreed and replaced the wheels.

An independent engineers report at your own expense is not always required.

It‘s timely that you should post this. :) Sounds like you were lucky or knew how to say the right things?

I have asked for the thread to be moved here (with greater traffic than the PS5 forum) in the hope that AVF members, that have had similar experiences (particularly dealing with Currys after a product has gone beyond the standard 12 month warranty), may be able to offer guidance on how to proceed.

I composed a reasoned and non aggressive query/appeal to Curry’s customer services via email and twitter, citing that the “too many USB devices connected“ USB port error is a known issue, particularly as there is an online article(s) covering it. I also politely highlighted the previous points made about consumer law on this thread and appealed for them to repair without charging me.

I have received a reply from Currys via twitter and it was unfortunately along the lines of what I predicted they would say:

I am sorry to hear of the issues with your console. As a company we do understand our obligation to repair or replace products under the twelve-month guarantee provided with the goods. I do appreciate that defects may not manifest themselves until after the initial guarantee period has expired. In view of this and in order that I may consider your request for the product to be repaired out of guarantee, I would request that you supply a diagnostic report from a qualified agent. The report must state the nature of the fault, the likely cause, and details of the diagnostic processes used. It should also state the estimated cost of repair and whether the fault is considered to be caused by an inherent manufacturing defect. We will refund the cost of this report if proven that it is a manufacturing defect. Upon receipt of this we will consider your claim and contact you again once a decision has been made. Thanks. Carrie.

I’m not sure what to do next, as this is the first time something like this has happened in my years of buying electronic goods. They’ve either lasted long enough for me to not warrant seeking this avenue or broke down within the standard 12 months warranty. I’ve never felt the need to buy extended warranties and certainly didn’t expect my son’s PS5 to break down just out of warrantly.

I don’t have the first clue of who to hire for a diagnostic report from a qualified engineer and/or how much such a report would cost? Any pointers of what kind of firm/engineer I’m supposed to hire as a google search has not been helpful?

If the report doesn’t rule in my favour (which it should as we’ve not done anything ourselves in terms of damage/wear and tear - just used it as you would normally - but you just never know), then I’d be further out of pocket.

The whole thing could add up to being the equivalent of buying a new PS5 unless there is another way to convince Currys to fix it? Maybe some sort of escalation process?

Maybe I could just take it to Currys for repair, pay for it and try to reclaim via small claims court?

I’ve never been in this position so would appreciate any helpful advice/guidance, thank you. :)
 

springtide

Distinguished Member
I was in a similar situation with a Garmin a few years ago, failed at 13 months and was originally told it was out of warranty.

I followed up with the following email, and they changed their mind and replaced it..

———————————-/——-
The device is over a year old so is as you stated no longer under warranty. The fault has occurred because the device was not weather proof (IPX7) as stated in the product listing - which I would have expected for a device that cost close to £400:

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do...ium=web+page&utm_campaign=edge-series-landing


Quote: "Just don’t let its good looks fool you — Edge 800 is waterproof to IPX7 standards and can withstand hard knocks and scrapes it might
endure in mountain biking environments."

The Sale of Goods Act 1979) states that the item should be fit for purpose (see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theoneshow/consumer/2009/07/03/sale_of_goods_act_letter_downl.html)
which goes beyond the warranty period (it's actually for 6 years).


As the fault occurred due to the unit not being properly weather sealed to be able to withstand a little rain when being used on the bike; this
is exactly how it is stated that the unit is desiged for. The device was only used on the road, so the environment was less harsh than what was quoted within the design specification above.

The SOG act states:

  • Of satisfactory quality - the product you buy should be reasonably reliable.
  • Fit for purpose - it should perform the function you bought it to do.
  • As described - it should be exactly what the trader told you it was.

With this in mind, I consider that I have either been miss sold this product as the product wasn't up to the specification as described
within the specifications or the unit was faulty from manufacture. As stated above, the SOG act extends past the warranty period, usually up
to 6 years.

I await your response.

——————-
 

TheHighFlyingBirds

Distinguished Member
@bruce-leroy unfortunately they are pushing you down the engineer report route to identify the actual fault. This places all the burden on you to get it sorted and prove its an design / manufacturing fault etc.

You would have been best just following @ChuckMountain's advice and quote the applicable consumer rights in that you expect a premium device to last more than 13 months when used in accordance with the manufacturers guidelines, as such it is not fit for purpose. I would be pushing back quoting the exact regs and the exact clause to which it would fall under. This is the key part for me, as it demonstrates that you are aware of the specific regs and that you are informing them of the clause they are neglecting, such that if it goes further e.g. small claims, you can show you have informed them of their duty with respect to a legal law, which they have ignored and failed to comply with.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
As to where to go for expert analysis and indeed a report as to what the problem is and how it should be fixed. The simplest solution is Sony themselves. You'd have to pay them to diagnose the cause of the issue at one of their recognised service centres, but they will or should then supply you with a report of what the issue is if one is requested and a quote for how much it would cost to repair if it can be repaired.

There are also independant services that specialise in console repairs. I'd approach one of them to inquire as to whether or not they'd be willing to diagnose the issue and then write you a report. Be sure to relate to them why you want this report though andf stress that you are not just looking for a quote for a repair.
 
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ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Just to add I have seen the original email sent now by @bruce-leroy and I hope he doesn’t mind me saying but was a bit too nice. It just needs to be short and to the point as @TheHighFlyingBirds states.

Also because the device arrived in December, the warranty only starts when you receive the goods so in this case it was just 16 days outside of the manufactures warranty.

Additionally he paid by Mastercard so has additional protection under the consumer credit act.

Currys are taking the mick with this one but I suspect the agent is just following a standard process and if the op is not mentioning the right things make it awkward. It’s in their interest to protect their bottom line.

The op has already given evidence of the issue and that it is a known fault, under the CRAv the retailer can’t make it awkward for the consumer.

So either go back with a better email (put a draft here), stating these and that it’s not fit for purpose, give them 7 days to respond and if not you will be going to money claims online (small claims).

Or you could approach your credit card provider.

You have to give the retailer the opportunity to put it right. If you just repaired it and then claimed for that, then that would be not really giving the opportunity.
 

crazy_1201

Active Member
What did Sony say to your query? I know in Malaysia if you registered your PS5 they were giving an additional 3 months free of warranty.
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
Just a quick one to say thanks everyone for your help thus far. :) I’m working over New Years so I’ll go through them properly later and update on the path I will take.

I’m thinking I’ll first contact credit card company re @ChuckMountain, and then also send a less nice, to the point response to Currys’ unhelpful reply - emphasising the points discussed on consumer law - and let them know I’m not happy, and have contacted credit card company citing consumer credit act section 75. Thanks everyone. :)
 

nvingo

Distinguished Member
and let them know I’m not happy, and have contacted credit card company citing consumer credit act section 75.
Perhaps someone would like to advise if whether it's better to do that at this stage or wait on their response to the 'item unfit for purpose' is unsatisfactory.
 

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