Question £750 Gaming Rig Thoughts?

Grangey.

Distinguished Member
Depends what kind of gaming performance you want.
For example you could remove the aftermarket cooler in favour of the stock one, and swap out the nvme drive for a standard disk hdd (actual game times are not that different on a 7200rpm drive vs nvme, check YouTube), giving you a higher budget for a better gpu- best bang for buck here being in the used market especially post 3070 release.

Ultimately unless you’re really hung up on buying new, youd get way more for your money buying used. With zen3 being out in November, and both 30 series GPUs and big Navi likely in way more hands within the next month, there will be a lot of 2xxx series owners upgrading, selling old systems/parts as a result.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
and swap out the nvme drive for a standard disk hdd (actual game times are not that different on a 7200rpm drive vs nvme, check YouTube)
Agree with everything else you have put apart from this. Do you have any links to these, all the ones that I have seen have shown loading times off at least 2 to 5 times longer. Frame rate may be less do difference but putting a spinning piece of rust in a machine these days will cause windows to be considerably slower too. Should be avoided at all costs imo :D
 

Grangey.

Distinguished Member
Agree with everything else you have put apart from this. Do you have any links to these, all the ones that I have seen have shown loading times off at least 2 to 5 times longer. Frame rate may be less do difference but putting a spinning piece of rust in a machine these days will cause windows to be considerably slower too. Should be avoided at all costs imo :D
Loading times pre level load are the only difference, but varies by game granted, nvme 7-15 secs, hdd 30-60. However with the fact you can upgrade your pc any time, it makes far more sense spending more on a higher grade gpu initially, being able to add an nvme down the line IF you find loading times are really THAT unmanageable for you.

With most impressed more graphically and by responsiveness (gpu), top end loading times are just a nice to have, and for me doesn’t make sense so on a “budget” build, if it means vs sacrificing detail and FPS.

With the suggestion to remove this, the op saves some £110.

£20 for a hdd, £90 more on the gpu budget moving it into the £250 range which opens way more options in the post 3070 release era.
 
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Grangey.

Distinguished Member
Not to mention, with new consoles having 1tb of space, I’d question how long a 500gb might last in the next few years (if the op was into MW for example, that’s most the drive gone by the time you’ve loaded windows).

Going hdd initially gives you the space to see how much space you need, then if/when an nvme is still needed, could just add a 1tb as appropriate.
 
Switch out the CPU fkr thr 3600 for the same price.
Get rid of the cooler. Just use the one that comes with CPU.

Upgrade the MoBo to a 550 for future proofing.

Should work out about the same price.
 

GreyMutton

Active Member
I'd definitely get an nvme. Although you can upgrade later, that involves a windows reinstall. Not that this would be an issue for you but it's a pain in the neck.
Also the responsiveness of the system is leagues ahead of a HDD.
 

Sandman

Distinguished Member
Definitely get rid of the cooler and use the one that comes with the CPU. As above change the CPU for a 3600. Save a bit more by replacing the NVME for a standard m.2 SSD as the speed difference will be negligible. Spend the £60 quid you save doing this on a 2gb HDD for storage.
What monitor are you using? If gaming at 1080p the GPU you have chosen will be fine.
 

CARLOS

Distinguished Member
This would be my recommendation at the £750 price, agree with others that you definitely want a SSD as they do make quite a difference when gaming but I wouldn't go for NVme as a normal SSD will give you far more value for money and not much less performance.

 

Sandman

Distinguished Member
This would be my recommendation at the £750 price, agree with others that you definitely want a SSD as they do make quite a difference when gaming but I wouldn't go for NVme as a normal SSD will give you far more value for money and not much less performance.

This looks like a good system to me. I would go with a m.2 drive though just to make the setup cleaner (2 less cables to deal with).
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Going hdd initially gives you the space to see how much space you need, then if/when an nvme is still needed, could just add a 1tb as appropriate.
Sorry but still going to disagree with you on this one, as @CARLOS states by all means swap to a larger SSD but for the sake of the cost of a take away I would stick with an SSD as a minimum.

Windows performance is soo much slower with an HDD, its the IOPS that are important, HDD in the order of hundreds, with SSD in the order of hundreds of thousands.

Look at the boot speed for this machine


Plus the whole responsiveness of the system thereafter.

Even for games when not running a pre-canned benchmark an SSD will be better, particularly for openworld game where you don't get loading of levels.

Heck PS5 (and now Nvidia) have spent a lot of time ensuring that SSD is an integral part of the gaming experience.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Sorry but still going to disagree with you on this one, as @CARLOS states by all means swap to a larger SSD but for the sake of the cost of a take away I would stick with an SSD as a minimum.

Windows performance is soo much slower with an HDD, its the IOPS that are important, HDD in the order of hundreds, with SSD in the order of hundreds of thousands.

Look at the boot speed for this machine


Plus the whole responsiveness of the system thereafter.

Even for games when not running a pre-canned benchmark an SSD will be better, particularly for openworld game where you don't get loading of levels.

Heck PS5 (and now Nvidia) have spent a lot of time ensuring that SSD is an integral part of the gaming experience.
Agree 100%. SSD given significantly decreased load times compared to HDD.
 

sykotik

Distinguished Member
An other vote for an SSd ,
it doesn't have to be a NVMe drive or even m.2 style --a good middle class 2.5 sata ssd drive can make a lot of difference .. and these are cheap as chip at the moment ...
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
I would definitely go for an NVME.

Ideally when building a PC, you want it to at least match or better the performance of a PS5/XSX which both have superior storage to a 7200RPM HDD.

With the news of the new tech from NVIDIA and AMD potentially which will use NVME storage to leverage GPU memory grunt, I'd be hesitant at this day in age to order anything which doesn't have an NVME (or maybe SSD if you want to chance having to upgrade to NVME later).

We're in a sticky situation for PC gaming at this budget in all honesty and at 750 quid, I'd be looking at second hand for the best performance. Otherwise you will be left with a rig which might be outperformed by consoles in <1 year.
 

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