Question £1000 to spend.

Discussion in 'What Is The Best TV For You?' started by Firesilver, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. Firesilver

    Firesilver
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    Hi all, as per the title basically, we've decided it's finally time to upgrade from our Samsung PE43H4500 to something 4k. Something around the 55" mark.

    I've just measured it out and we sit around 8ft from the unit (way further than I anticipated) and from my reading on here the consensus is there's no real benefit to UHD at this distance?
    At the moment 99% of the time we watch everything in HD and with 4k streaming services and TV providers bringing UHD programming in it seems crazy to be buying anything Full HD these days.

    Currently I can't really pull my attention away from the Panasonic TX58DX902B that someone linked in another thread for £999 (can't be delivered to my address, on sale elsewhere for £1099) as it seems to be highly regarded as an amazing buy.

    Is there anything else as highly recommended in the price bracket we're looking at? The speed of the interface is very important to me especially, having played around with my mum's low end LG I was amazed by the speed of the menus and opening/browsing apps.

    **Edit**
    Just found this list so here goes :
    Please answer the following questions:
    1. What are your sources going to be? UHD streams, possibly UHD TV channels, catch up TV, possibly HDR consoles in the next gen.
    2. SD vs HD vs UHD use percentage? 5%, 95%, N/A
    3. Movies, football, console games, PC use (in percentage)? 50/50 movies and sports.
    4. Are you bothered with basic calibration ie discs? No.
    5. How close can you view the TV? 8ft away currently.
    6. What are you currently using and what do you expect by upgrading to a new TV? Chromecast for netflix mainly, looking to remove it from the equation, Virgin TiVo box (will likely get their new version at some point.)

    Please rearrange the following PQ attributes, in descending importance:

    Blacks
    HDR Brightness
    HDR Colour Accuracy
    HDR Colour Saturation
    Motion handling (and do you like to have options in the menu to increase motion clarity or do you leave these settings alone)
    SDR Brightness
    SDR Colour Saturation
    SDR Colour Accuracy
    Local dimming
    Viewing angle (will you view from the side, or head on)
    How accurate the picture is out of the box (without having to change any settings)


    Now for bugs, tell us your possible pet hates related to TVs, in descending order:
    (Honestly all of these pet hates are very equal to me)

    Reflective screens
    Temporary image retention
    Loss of detail in dark areas
    3:2 Pulldown Judder with 24hz movies. See: Judder-Free 24p on TVs
    Bad screen uniformity, Dirty Screen Effect, Clouding, Light Bleed, Blooming
    Soap Opera Effect
    Haloing
    Colour banding. See: Gradients on TVs: Color bit depth (warning this is not the same as vertical banding, for vertical banding see bad screen uniformity)

    Now which is most important to you?

    HDR PQ
    Price
    Smart TV (Netflix/Prime Video/Catch Up TV)
    Sound
    Connections
    SDR PQ
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
  2. Dodgexander

    Dodgexander
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    Thanks for giving so much information in your post, makes it easier to help you.

    At £1000 though you can't really afford a capable HDR TV unless you look at deals similar to the DX902 you have already mentioned, in essence if at 2017 model you would be looking at spending £1800 for comparable performance. So you can't really compare.

    New you are looking at at least £1200 for the Sony 49" XE900 and more for larger sizes. If you can wait to purchase at the right time though that will go down in price.

    In truth I think you wouldn't be wise to upgrade now, you have very limited UHD sources, even more limited HDR sources. Why not just upgrade when you have more of these?

    At 8ft you want to be looking at at least a 65" TV and to find a capable HDR TV at that budget and size even when TVs get their cheapest this year is going to be impossible.

    It would perhaps be wise now to buy a TV like the Hisense 65N6800 and forgo decent HDR capabilities for the time being, either that or just wait to buy when prices are better and your sources of HDR are a lot higher. Maybe then more capable HDR TVs will be cheaper.
     
  3. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    The H4500 was only a 2014 model wasn't it? 'Finally time to upgrade' after just three years seems an odd comment. Is this purchase mainly for upsizing?
     
  4. Firesilver

    Firesilver
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    Thanks for your reply, I did figure that £1000 might well be slightly low for a good quality TV.

    Where does the recommendation for screen size to viewing distance actually come from? I feel if we sat at the recommended distance from our current TV (6ft?) the quality would be noticeably worse?

    Also forgive my ignorance, but do Netflix and Amazon video not offer HDR content? I can't see myself ending up with a UHD blu-ray player any time soon, unless the next gen consoles support it the same way the PS3 did.

    I'd imagine it to be purely speculation, but will we be seeing UHD TV channels becoming the norm soon like we did when HD TV's came around?

    I'm not sure of the H4500's age but we did get it second hand with a chromecast and an old sound system for £200 in 2015. We did intend to upgrade fairly soon after but other priorities came first. A new purchase would be mainly for upsizing and the convenience of a smart TV.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
  5. Dodgexander

    Dodgexander
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    Viewing distance recommendations are based on resolution, its a pain because with UHD you are recommend to view very close (approx twice as close as with FHD). So yes, if you view close enough to benefit from UHD things like standard definition will look significantly worse. HD not so much as UHD TVs do a decent job upscaling HD.

    At the same time if you view far enough away depending on your source you will struggle to benefit from the extra resolution of UHD.

    Netflix and Amazon do, but the choice isn't fantastic. There are only a few select TV series with HDR and new series are still released often without it. The quality of HDR on streams is also poor compared to that of UHD Blu-Rays.

    Xbox One X if you get it has a UHD Blu-Ray compatibility, PS4 pro does not.

    H series was 2014 and your current TV is still decent for SDR standards. Right now you can expect an upgrade for £1000 going for something like a Sony 55XE85 series TV but its HDR is limited only to having more saturated colours.

    I guess the main point to make is don't expect too much of a change in the quality of existing HD content, you'll need UHD for a new TV to shine and you'll need to view close enough to really benefit from it. Things like colour with SDR sources will look the same, motion will be similar.

    I am really not an advocate of using built in smart TV though, in my opinion its really not a consideration that should be made when purchasing a television when there are so many other aspects to think about, especially when separate solutions are still better.
     
  6. Firesilver

    Firesilver
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    Again, thanks for your reply, lots to take onboard and consider before splashing the cash.

    On the point of separate solutions rather than the inbuilt players, specifically what would you be referring to?

    Also, is there any TV's just now that you would recommend holding out for price wise, or anything that would be an irresistible deal? (Like the Panasonic mentioned for under £1k seems to be)

    I think my eyes might not be as refined as everyone here, to me my mum's 43" LG looked great on regular HD content and an episode of The Grand Tour I tested on it looked great as well (to my eyes at least)
     
  7. Dodgexander

    Dodgexander
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    There are limitations with built in smart tv, no matter which platform. TVs are usually under powered, TV OS have more bugs and/or are under-supported compared to separates. The longevity of any device can be considered the same as a smart phone, perhaps okay when you buy it, but in a few years useless with app support and slow speed.

    TVs that are popular this year would be the Sony XE90 series, maybe when this tv is likely at its cheapest in spring it will be nearer the 1k mark at 55", maybe at black friday it will reach the 1k mark at 49".

    Otherwise its been a poor year overall, TVs are overpriced in general and there isn't as much choice as there was last year at your price point.

    Hopefully the newer Hisense N8700 will change this, there should be a review by Steve soon on that model. Its a little cheaper than the Sony XE90 series but if it performs well then it may take the best buy mid range TV crown.
     

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