Toshiba Qosmio X770-136 Gaming 3D Laptop Review

Greg Hook takes a look at Toshiba's latest 3D Gaming and Entertainment Laptop

by Greg Hook
Tech Review

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136 Gaming 3D Laptop Review
SRP: £1,720.00

Introduction

Only a few, short years ago gaming on a laptop meant you had to put up with a small, low resolution screen, a compact keyboard, shoddy sound quality, a sluggish processor and integrated graphics. All of which meant you could only play older PC games and, even then, mostly on low settings. Plus if you wanted to get the best out of it for gaming you also needed a headset and mouse. You might as well have just got a desktop PC in the first place. Although, to be fair, they did have their uses. If you found yourself stuck in a caravan for a week in ‘record’ heavy rain, that laptop became your best friend; even if it was a very slow, somewhat unattractive and uninspiring buddy.

Over the last few years several companies have introduced dedicated ‘gaming’ laptops - particularly from the likes of Alienware and Dell - offering very high specifications when compared to older systems. This gives those who don’t want to be tied down to a desktop PC system a chance at a decent level of gaming, whilst not suffering too much derision from their gaming rig owning brothers.
Jack-of-all-trades technology company, Toshiba, have also been after a slice of this lucrative gaming laptop pie for some years now and their Qosmio X770 range, launched in 2011, boasts that it offers ‘powerful 3D gaming and entertainment’. Standard specifications include an i7 quad core processor, 3D capability, 1080P display and Nvidia GTX560M graphics. I’ll be looking at their X770-136 model in greater detail and seeing if it offers everything you will need to keep that desktop gaming PC quiet for a while.

Design and Aesthetics

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

One of the first things you will notice when you take this beast of a machine out of its packaging is the styling. Toshiba have really gone to town with this one. Its design is of metallic black graduating to deep red with a lined pattern, along with a red backlight keyboard, red light on the mouse pad and various other red lights on the shortcut buttons really make this laptop stand out along with the two stereo speakers below the rather tasty stylised grilles. If you don’t like red and black, you’ll have a problem, but we happen to think it’s rather sexy.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

The build quality is excellent. The keys and buttons feel solid and firm and the screen opens and closes smoothly without that wobbly effect you sometimes get on cheaper laptops due to the use of cheaper hinges. The power connector is a four prong affair and, as such, provides a very secure fit. There’s no worryingly loose connection that plague the laptops from the likes of Acer, where you feel it's about to fall out at any minute or the slightest snag will snap it off.

Weight and Exhaust


As it is a laptop and thus - shock horror - you might actually want to have on your lap rather than a desk, the weight and heat output is something to consider. You don’t want your legs to be boiling after just a few minutes and likewise you don’t want dead legs from having something akin to a lump of concrete across them. With the Toshiba Qosmio X770 the weight is a reasonable 3.6kg, which is light compared to other gaming laptops such as the Alienware M17x at over 5kg but it’s still a lot heavier than non-gaming laptops such as the Lenovo G770 that tips the scales at just 3kg.

The heat is exhausted out of the left hand side of the machine your legs don’t feel as if they’re about to combust. A session with the Qosmio on your lap will not bring you any major dead leg related discomfort plus, if it’s a cold day, you can put your hands in front of the exhaust vent and they will feel quite toasty as it does put out a lot of heat!

Connections and Interface


The Qosmio X770 is reasonably well represented in the connection department with an external RGB monitor port; 2 x USB 3.0 (up to 10 times faster than USB 2.0) plus 3 x USB 2.0 ports; headphone and microphone jacks; LAN port and HDMI out. Those connections are all situated either side of the Toshiba, with no connections to the rear. To the front, there’s a solitary memory card reader compatible with SD, SDHC, Multimedia Card, xD Picture Card and Memory Stick.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
On the main body of the laptop, above the keyboard, you will find various quick access controls for Toshiba’s Eco Mode (explained later in this review), on/off for Wi-Fi, 3D indicator and a volume up and down. Above the touch pad is a button to disable it, if you are using an external mouse and don’t want the risk of an unexpected brush. Above the screen you will find the IR emitter for the Nvidia 3D Vision along with the integrated HD 3D Web Camera (1,280 x 800) with its built-in microphone. Finally, the BD-ROM Blu-ray disc drive is found on the right hand side.

The system comes with Windows 7 installed, configured and ready to go. It does pay to spend a bit of time updating the various drivers as you will most likely find many are out-of-date, along with various programs that require patches. This is an issue you often find with 'off the shelf' computer systems or laptops, rather than custom built machines where some of the hard work of making sure the drivers, programs and even BIOS versions are bang up to date is already done.

Given the £1700 you are shelling out for this laptop, the specification could be better. You get an Intel i7 Quad Core (hex thread) CPU running at 2.2Ghz or 3.1Ghz in turbo mode (which the system will do automatically for you when needed) and 8GB of DDR3 memory. Along with an Nvidia GTX560M graphics adaptor (192bit @ 775mhz). For the outlay here you would really expect a far more powerful graphics adaptor; the Nvidia GTX580M would be the minimum I would want and in my gaming test section this lowly GTX560M is really brought to task.

The Qosmio also comes with two Sata-2 3GB/s hard drives; one being a standard 5400RPM Toshiba 500GB hard disc drive and the other being a new-fangled Solid State Hybrid Drive. This is a 500GB 7200RPM Seagate Momentus XT which also incorporates 4GB of NAND flash memory, which is apparently to allow a fast boot-up and faster data loading. An average boot-up time of about 50 seconds, whilst not in the same league as a pure solid state drive, does appear to be an improvement on the average hard disc drive boot up time. The hybrid drive also claims to be learning, which means it should get to know which are the most commonly used files and in the case of the boot up means it should gradually get quicker. Proof that it actually works was evidenced by a decrease to just 46 seconds on the last boot-up of the system.

Battery Life


One of the most important things when considering a laptop, especially a gaming one, is how long will the battery last. In this case, the answer is not very long at all! For example, from fully charged to completely flat in the balanced power mode, the Qosmio gave me a ‘massive’ 20 minutes of gaming time on COD:MW3. I was so shocked at this that I did it several times just to make sure I hadn’t blacked out or entered a time warp. It's recommended to charge the battery up fully and let it go flat a few times to ‘optimise’ it from new, which I did here, but the battery time remained the same. Toshiba’s technical specifications claim the battery life is up to 2 ½ hours which, given that ‘up to’ normally means the very best possible outcome, is woeful performance.

Another test from a fully charged battery, just sat on the desktop doing nothing at all, and it lasted only 1 hour 45 minutes. Bizarrely I received a battery warning after 1 hour saying I only had 4 minutes and 6% battery left but it lasted out for nearly another hour. Watching a 3D Blu-ray and you will be lucky if you get past the opening credits. If you are spending £1700 on a gaming laptop, then I’m pretty sure you would want the battery to last a decent length of time. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m not expecting it to last hours, given the power that it requires for gaming, but would I be out of line asking for 1 hour at least? The battery life is so ridiculously short that it pretty much requires you to have it plugged in permanently, unless you are just doing some casual web browsing. To me that kind of removes the point of having a laptop over a desktop PC in the first place if you are tied to the power outlet all the time.

The system does have a feature called Toshiba eco Utility which basically puts the laptop in the most economical state it can to reduce the power consumption. There are features such as dimming the screen, turning off the red lights, keyboard illumination and putting the system to sleep after just 5 minutes of inactivity. It will even tell you the exact watts that you are currently using. This feature appeared to prolong the battery life, but only if you didn’t actually use it and let it go to sleep, which seems rather pointless to me. Also in this mode there was an odd clicking sound coming from the machine and you could hear the fan constantly stopping and starting as it was obviously being put in and out of the low power mode.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

3D Display The 17.3” Toshiba TruBrite® Full HD TFT 3D vision display has LED backlighting and offers 1920 x 1080 resolution (16:9 ratio) and a decent response time of 5 milliseconds. It’s a high brightness display to assist with the slight dimming that you will get with 3D turned on due to the glasses. This all serves up to provide an overall high quality screen, although for non 3D use you may find the screen to be a tad too bright at default settings. The glossy display helps ensure the colours are bright, crisp and bold. The smallest text is clearly readable and using a quick test program such as Passmark’s Monitor Test, you can see how well it copes. Laptop displays have really come on from the old days of the matte screens and the Qosmio screen is another fine example. I had no complaints with the display at all.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Sound

Now let’s have a look (or a listen) at the sound system in this beast. We have here a pair of Harmon/Kardon stereo speakers mounted above the keyboard behind a pair of sexy looking grilles (if a speaker grille could ever be called sexy?) plus a subwoofer fitted to the base of the laptop. It has Dolby Advanced audio with Toshiba’s ‘Bass Enhanced Sound System’. The sound quality is very impressive here and feels punchy and rich, with a good bass and is very clear. It has none of the overly tinny noise you get with a lot of the speakers on the cheaper basic laptops, where you would most likely prefer to use headphones to save your ears from the horror, but here you can quite happily play a game or watch a Blu-ray using the onboard sound and not feel hard done by with it. It’s probably amongst the best laptop sound I have heard, but then for £1700 I’d expect nothing less!

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Pre-installed Software

As with most laptops these days they like to pre-install loads of software that you probably don’t need and won’t ever use. Toshiba is no different with a whole host of software installed for you already. Although easy to do yourself, useful software to see already installed are the likes of Google Chrome, Skype and the BBC iPlayer desktop player. You also get McAfee anti-virus installed along with desktop shortcut icons for the likes of Ebay and Amazon and the manual for the laptop itself.

Also pre-installed is the WildTangent Games Console. This is a web based system and includes several games on the laptop free to play along with 1000’s more that you can download and pay a small fee to play. On the laptop already are the likes of Bejewelled and the crazily addictive Plants Vs Zombies which, if the 30 minutes that disappeared once I had started it up are anything to go by, certainly lives up to its name. The majority of these games are nothing special (although several are in 3D which is good to see) and are very similar to other web based games and apps that you would find on an iPad. Despite this being web based, it was a pleasant surprise to see that the games which were already installed run without an active internet connection.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Now on to the Toshiba software. They have really gone to town here and there are a huge amount of different utility programs, media players and system tools to help you with every aspect of the laptop and how to get the best out of it. The main ‘shopfront’ to these is the Toshiba Board. This gives quick access to various system health checks, user guides and system information. Along with Toshiba Tempro which notifies you of important alerts related to the system such as health issues, software and Bios updates. The updates are installed via the Toshiba Service Station. This is similar to Windows Update and works well streamlining the installing of any updates, with an option to ignore any that you don’t want.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

The last one I’ll mention, as I could go on forever really, is the Toshiba ReelTime. This is a graphical history/indexing tool that runs just above the taskbar and gives quick access to any recent files or programs that you may have accessed along with any recent website visits. It does take up a fair bit of screen space, but does seem to be very useful as you can group it into documents, photos or videos. If I owned this laptop, the Toshiba ReelTime is probably one of the few programs I would use regularly.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

To sum up here, most of these Toshiba pre-installed programs are unnecessary and appear to be Toshiba’s versions of programs you would normally use (or already have). A intermediate and upwards PC user probably would not want any of them and most likely disable or uninstall them (if possible), but the casual and inexperienced user may find the majority of the programs a great help for day to day use of the laptop.

Gaming Tests

The Qosmio X770 is equipped with an Nvidia GTX 560M graphics adaptor with 1.5GB of Video RAM. Don’t be fooled into thinking this is an equivalent to the outstanding desktop PC GTX560 graphics card as it clearly isn’t. The GTX560M chip is equivalent in desktop terms to an Nvidia GTS450. I’m mentioning the price again, but for £1700 Toshiba should have really fitted something better than the 560M. The equivalent priced Alienware machine has a 2GB GTX660M for example.

Battlefield 3 - 1920 x 1080 resolution Released in late October 2011, Battlefield 3 was the long awaited sequel to the hugely popular Battlefield 2. Building on the original Frostbite engine used in Battlefield: Bad Company 2, Frostbite 2.0 aims to test PC hardware to the maximum. With the i7-2670QM processor with a turbo mode up to only 3.1 Ghz and the Nvidia GTX560M this system really struggled. On Ultra, High and Medium settings the game is unplayable giving an FPS of just 8 with 3D mode activated and 16 on normal mode in Ultra, 13 and 24 and 16 and 32 in High and Medium respectively.

It’s only when I put everything on low settings that you start to get a decent playable frame rate. With 3D mode activated, Battlefield 3 is not a game for this laptop if you want a smooth level of gameplay. The FPS in 3D mode varied depending on the map from 20 to 30 (left hand screenshot below), with lots going on this will drop significantly to an unplayable level. Non 3D mode was better with an FPS varying from 40 to 58. With a lot of action going on it remained fully playable. But is BF3 on low settings (and not at all in 3D) what you expected for £1700? No, me neither!

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 - 1920 x 1080 resolution

Released shortly after Battlefield 3 in November 2011, Modern Warfare 3 is the latest annual release from the Call of Duty franchise. This is not a demanding game at all and like most of the Call of Duty games will run quite nicely on most machines. It’s worth noting to make sure that you install the latest graphics drivers before you start gaming. The Qosmio X770 came with a very outdated set of drivers, so old that Battlefield 3 wouldn’t even run until I had updated the drivers. Modern Warfare 3 for example received an FPS boost of 10 in 3D mode and 30 in normal mode just by updating the drivers.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Pointing to the limitations of the 560M graphics adaptor, the laptop performed slightly worse here than I was expecting. With 3D mode activated I struggled to get much above 30 (the screenshot above is with 3D on). Non 3D gaming with maximum settings returned an FPS of 73 which is great and I can't really complain about that, but for such a hardware friendly series that the Call of Duty games are, 30FPS in 3D is a bit of a let down to put it mildly.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Ignoring the low frame rate, the 3D mode on both Battlefield 3 and Call of Duty:Modern Warfare 3 did look rather impressive. The 3D had real depth and objects really stood out at you without sacrificing any visual quality and clarity. Both games had issues with on screen icons being forced to the front and probably not something I would use for long gaming sessions. The Nvidia 3D Vision system works great and without any issues, it’s easy to enable and disable via the quick access button above the keyboard.

Temperatures and Noise

The screenshot below from HWMonitor shows the maximum temperatures the various system components reached during a gaming session on Battlefield 3. The CPU maximum temperature reached a rather high 86Deg C but it is within the operating parameters and the TJMax (the maximum safe temperature for each CPU core) of 100deg c. The cooling is obviously different than a desktop PC and this level of system temperature should not cause concern but perhaps suggests you may not get a lot more out of the system if you chose to overclock the CPU or graphics. The system did not suffer any issues other than an enormous amount of heat coming out of the vent on the left side. If you are using this on your lap then the heat shouldn’t be too much of a problem. But as I said earlier, on a cold day you can keep your hands nice and toasty and probably even keep a cup of coffee warm if you put it near the vent.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

As for noise levels, idling and for general use the system is very quiet, with just a barely noticeable whirring of the main system fan and the hard drives are as close to silent as you will probably get without being of the solid state variety. For DVD and Blu-ray playback the system noise level barely increases above the idle level. With the noise level being unobtrusive even during the quietest of scenes. For gaming the system noise level does increase due to the additional work it is having to do, but not ridiculously so. The noise does not overpower the gaming and barely increases over the idle level. At all times the system noise level (tested at 1' distance) was so low that it never registered on my sound level meter which has a minimum level of 34dB. Some laptops such as my old Acer sound like a jet engine is building up and it is about to take off from your lap never to be seen again, but thankfully the Toshiba Qosmio X770 is a very quiet machine.

Home Cinema Features

Windows 7 has really brought the PC into the living room in a much easier way than any previous operating system did. Gone are the days, as some members may remember, of using a program called PowerStrip to configure exactly the output of the secondary display and if you were slightly off it either didn’t work or was not in the mode you most desired. Along with even having to tell the PC that there was a second display attached at all. It’s now thankfully extremely user friendly. You just plug the HDMI cable in and it automatically shows the PC display on your TV. If routed via an amplifier it will even detect that too.

The laptop came with WinDVD2010 pre-installed which had an annoying issue in that it would not pass the HD audio through to my amplifier. This appears to be a known issue and unfortunately due to it being a Toshiba modified version, no patches could be downloaded from the WinDVD site to possibly correct this issue. Instead I just downloaded a trial version of Power DVD 12 (much easier to use program by the way) and after a quick change of the audio settings my amplifier was reporting True HD and DTS-HD MA in all its glory.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Compared to a standalone Blu-ray player, you benefit here from much faster loading times and also resume play on any disc you care to try, even if you have taken the disc out and shut the laptop down. A feature that standalone players are severely lacking. I tested with Transformers, Thor and Star Trek. The Blu-ray discs all played without issue at 1080P 24FPS. The images were crisp and clear with no stuttering, slowdowns or system freezes. As previously mentioned the noise level from the system is very quiet and did not cause an annoyance during the film playbacks. The amplifier reported the correct HD audio signals. Connected to my homegroup with Windows 7, streaming audio or video files was effortless. Using Windows Media Centre, video files, pictures or anything that you desire can be played back with no effort at all.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Windows 7 really does make it very easy to use your laptop to display content through your home cinema setup or TV. The only issue being the battery life meaning you would have to keep it plugged in all the time. But with a low noise and heat level and the option of using it as a 3D Blu-ray player if you have a 3D ready TV this laptop performed well here.

3D Playback

A major selling point of this laptop is its built-in 3D, we’ll take a look here to see if it’s actually any good! Using the supplied Nvidia 3D Vision active shutter glasses the 3D quality from the Blu-ray discs I tested was excellent. I wasn’t expecting an amazing level here (although for £1700 I probably should have been), but what I got was very pleasing indeed. The 3D had a very impressive depth whilst maintaining the quality of the visuals and it still ‘looked HD’. After tuning the glasses to suit my eyesight and face (it came with different nose pieces), I found them very comfortably, even having to wear them over my normal glasses that I have to wear. I initially suffered a lot of flickering on my peripheral vision but with the help of the setup wizards I was able to remove that completely. I also had no skull crushing headache, which apart from the £100,000 AVForums 3D demo at the Gadget Show Live recently and a few other rare instances, I normally get quite quickly with poorly attempted 3D. Thankfully the 3D on this laptop is spot on and really what you would expect at this price point.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Another feature I was impressed with was the 2D to 3D upconversion. Firstly using the Toshiba Video Player 3D (pre-installed on the system), I played back an old standard definition DVD and I was very surprised at the quality of firstly the playback and also the 3D upconversion. It almost made me think it was a proper 3D film in places, with just a few minor picture issues such as an odd rippling effect (for want of a better description) giving the game away and it not coping well with the credits. The Toshiba Video Player 3D will also happily upconvert MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 file formats. Along with this PowerDVD 2012 gave a good account of itself in upconverting a 2D Blu-ray to 3D playback. Compared to the playback of a 3D Blu-ray, there did appear to be a slight loss of visual quality and a grainy effect introduced but the 3D quality was decent enough and perfectly watchable.

Benchmark Tests

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

The above screenshots are from CPU-Z and GPU-Z which are very handy (and free) programs showing the CPU clock speeds and voltages together with memory and other system information. Note the Turbo Mode 2993MHz (3Ghz) speed, this drops to under 800MHz when idle to save power (which this laptop sorely needs).

Time to Desktop - 46 seconds


Bootracer 3.1 is another free program that allows for an accurate test of the time it takes to get to the desktop, saving you from using a stopwatch to work it out for yourself! With Windows 7 installed and no SSD but with the Seagate 500GB Hybrid Drive instead, this machine reports a fair boot up time of 46 seconds. As you can see from the screenshot this varies a few seconds either way and can be greatly helped by reducing the number of programs and services that start automatically when Windows boots. The Hybrid drive with the 4GB NAND flash apparently has inbuilt learning of the files you use most often, so it should speed up in the short-term, which I did notice as originally it took almost 1 minute to boot, although it gradually increases over time with the number of programs installed.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Bootracer will keep a history of boot up times, allowing you to check should the time suddenly change for the worse (or better) following the installation of a new program or piece of hardware. As previously mentioned, it is also affected by programs that load on start up such as Steam, Origin, Anti Virus etc and I also noticed a decrease if you make sure nothing is in the DVD drive.

Super Pi – 1M – 12.668 seconds


Super Pi (again, another free program!) calculates Pi to a specified number of digits. It is used to test the CPU power and is a favourite among overclockers to test their speeds against the World Record times and the stability of their computer following an overclock. Super Pi is not optimised for dual or quad core processors and is purely a test of a CPU's single threaded capability. I have used the 1.5 mod version as it shows more detailed timings.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

12.668 seconds is the result from the 1M test run, which is a decent time based on the 'up to' 3.1Ghz clock speed in turbo mode from the Intel Quad core i7-2670QM processor. This falls short when compared to the 9.032 seconds of the i5-2500K @ 4.2Ghz overclocked CPU in the 3XS Nanu Gamer I reviewed on AVForums and also my own i5-2500K @ 4.5Ghz score of 8.3 seconds, but is still a good result for this CPU.
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Windows Experience Index


A standard test included in Windows 7, it gives a quick performance score of the current system. It is a simple test and is not favoured as a benchmarking tool, but is a quick and easy way to see how your computer fares. The result here is a low 5.9. The majority of the system scores from 7.2 for the graphics right up to 7.6 for the memory. With only the hard drive letting it all down with a 5.9 score, expected really given that it is not an SSD. The overall rating is determined by the lowest scoring component, rather than a weighted average score that you get in programs such as the Passmark Performance Test, so installing an SSD would see this increase quite substantially.

3D Mark 11


The latest version of Futuremark’s popular benchmarking tool is freely available to download, although to unlock the full functionality of it, they ask you to part with $19.95. It is particularly GPU intensive and is one of the favourite programs for PC gamers in particular, to test their system and compare it against a wide range of scores widely available on the internet, especially following the introduction of a new piece of hardware to their system.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

The score here of 2216 3D Marks is rather disappointing. Unlike the desktop version of the GTX560 which scored 5093 3D Marks in the recent 3XS Nanu Gamer review, the GTX560M should not be confused with its similarly named desktop (bigger and faster) brother. It is more in comparison with the desktop Nvidia GTS450 graphics card. With only a 775Mhz GPU clock speed (compared to 900 on the GTX560) and 192 shaders (compared to 384 on the GTX560) it's no surprise at the low result seen here. 3D Mark scoring is not entirely based on the power of the graphics card. Other factors such as the CPU power come into play, but as seen in the gaming scores it is a rather disappointing to see when you have parted with £1700 to get this laptop.
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Atto Disk Benchmark - SSD


Compared to the very fast speeds you will find with SSD drives, the Seagate 500GB 7200RPM Hybrid Drive and the Toshiba 500GB 5400RPM Hard Disc Drive perform to an average level here for mechanical drives. The results show the Seagate being about 40% faster than the Toshiba drive with a top read speed of 109MB/s and a write speed of 99MB/s compared to the Toshiba with a read/write speed of 78MB/s. Coupled with the 4GB NAND flash in the Hybrid drive, you would do best to have your most used files and games on the Hybrid drive with just photos, movies and other infrequently used programs and files on the Toshiba drive.
As with a few of the other benchmarks I have used in this review, over time they are useful to run every so often to keep an eye on how your system is performing. A sudden drop in a particular score could point to a possible issue, such as a hard drive failing or requiring de-fragmentation.

PassMark Performance Test 7.0


The final benchmark test gives an overall system performance following tests run on the CPU, GPU, Memory and disk drives. It is a weighted average score based on over 28 individual tests and therefore a low performing component will drag the score down. With a score of just 1600.2 this is comparable based on other user submitted results for comparable systems to the Qosmio X770-136. A low score affected by lack of an SSD drive and also the GTX560M graphics.

Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

System Summary

N/A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Build Quality
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Features
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Specification
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
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Included Software
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Value for Money
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Toshiba Qosmio X770-136

Benchmark Score Summary

N/A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Time to desktop 46 secs
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
Toshiba Qosmio X770-136
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6
AVForumsSCORE
OUT OF
10

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