Samsung D7000 (UE-40D7000) 3D LED LCD Television Review

Is it a D8000 in disguise? We check the D7000 to find out.

by hodg100
TV Review

13

Recommended
Samsung D7000 (UE-40D7000) 3D LED LCD Television Review
SRP: £1,349.00

Introduction

We've already had extensive hands on with the, more costly, UE-40D8000 and overall we were left impressed. There have been a number of enquiries as to whether a bargain could be had in the UE-D7000 given the almost identical specifications. If you are either ambivalent about or dislike the appearance of the D8000's chrome effect frame the D7000 does, on paper, promise very similar or even identical performance, for less, so we'll hit the D7000 with the full battery of AVForums testing to discover. As we've already explored the D8000 in detail, we've paid more attention to Samsung's Smart Hub platform in this review plus it's given us chance for a few side by side tests with other TVs to compare some areas of performance. So, whilst there will be areas of the review that will inevitably be similar, we've also managed to pack plenty of new information in there too. The Samsung UE-40D7000 has larger siblings in the UE-46D7000 and UE-D557000 that will offer a largely identical viewing experience.

Design and Connections

At first glance, one could easily mistake the UE-D7000 for its more costly and heralded stablemate, the UE-D8000. The now familiar micro-bezel is again in evidence but gone is the, at times, distracting chrome effect of the D8000, replaced by an ultra-thin strip of transparent plastic allowing the colours of the surroundings through. After living with the D7000 for a while, we decided we actually preferred its looks and although ambient lighting can reflect off the edges of the bezel, it happens nowhere near to the extent we saw with the D8000. There's also a very slender strip of black framing the imposingly black gloss screen and this does help when conveying the 3D presentation. The now signature four footed stand is once again present, we're not big fans but it does serve its intended purpose of allowing the Samsung range to be easily recognised on the shop floor. In terms of connectivity, the UE-D7000 shares exactly the input/output options of the D8000 so much of what we say here will be repetition. The rear of the chassis houses four sideways facing HDMI ports (HMDI2 being HDMI v1.4 ARC compliant) in a recessed cavity. There are also three side-facing USB inputs with one intended for use with the USB HDD PVR functionality. There are also sideward pointing connections for Component video input, in the form of an adaptor port, an SPDIF Digital Audio out and the PC sound-in jack.

Downward facing, on the bottom of the recess, we have aerial and satellite connections; a LAN port; a D-SUB PC input and a headphone jack. There are also two further adaptor inputs for use with legacy Scart connections. Samsung package all the adaptor leads in the box, thankfully. Despite Samsung UKs website information to the contrary, the UE-D7000 does come with a pair of Samsung's SSG-3100 active shutter glasses. The glasses themselves are very lightweight and comfortable but allow just a little more light in than is ideal. 3D is defintely best enjoyed in low light levels but the Samsung glasses pretty much put paid to any ideas of a cheeky afternoon 3D matinee unless you're prepared to draw the curtains.

Even though the UE-D7000 isn't quite a flagship product, the remote control supplied is still something of a small insult when you consider the price paid for the television. We can understand that Samsung want you to upgrade to the, soon to be available, QWERTY remote but the unit in the box really doesn't convey a feeling of quality. To be fair there are no operational issues with it other than the lack of controls for HDMI CEC connected devices, and there is a backlight, but we'd imagine owners of smartphones will be keen to download the Samsung Remote app to make best use of the 'Smart' features on board.

Menus

Naturally the UE-D7000 shares the same GUI and Menu structure as the rest of the range with options and sub-menus galore that are all colourfully yet, for the most part, clearly presented. Under some of the options, the GUI is even generous enough to offer a short description as to just what you might be affecting by changing a setting, and what's more, these descriptions are sometimes accurate! Pressing the MENU button on the remote presents the user with 6 sub-menus; Picture,Sound, Channel, Network, System and Support where the highlighted sub-menu item brings an overlay, on to the screen, containing the items contained therein. Considering the vast amount of options the Samsung TVs ship with, the description box is a welcome addition when you're trying to quickly find that option you were experimenting with that's buried 3 layers down!

As ever, the Picture menu is our main area of operations and it's one that could easily scare off the less knowledgeable with its enormous amount of options. There are 4 Picture Mode option as well as the standard Backlight, Contrast, Brightness, Sharpness and Colour adjustments located to the first page of the Picture menu in addition to what is likely to be a fairly superfluous Tint control, bearing in mind we have a functional CMS to play with. Scrolling down we have Screen Adjustment that accommodates the Screen Fit option, enabling 1:1 pixel mapping, which is of particular importance for Blu-ray material. Scrolling to the second page of the Picture Menu and we are presented with options for 3D output as well as Picture Options and Advanced Settings.

In our testing with the 3D sources the D7000 performed impeccably in detecting the correct 3D output but, nevertheless, the 3D menu allows setting of 3D output format. There's options for setting 3D Auto View and the 2D > 3D conversion mode and a 3D optimiser slider we found best left at the factory set value. Picture Options houses a couple of noise reduction options that proved relatively ineffectual with most content and there's Film Mode and Motion Plus settings that we'll address later in the review. Colour Tone is best set to Warm 2 in conjunction with the Movie picture mode for greatest accuracy and there's the HDMI Black Level option that governs setting of PC or Video levels - set to low for video content.

Under the Advanced Settings item we have Samung's generous set of controls afforded for a detailed calibration in the 2 and 10 point White Balance controls; a global Gamma setting and a fully fledged CMS brought up by selecting Custom from the Colour Space options. As we've mentioned before the upper end Samsung TVs come with a R/G/B only mode that means a pretty accurate calibration of colour luminance can be achieved very quickly in conjunction with use of SMPTE Colour Bars or similar. We really can't think of another TV manufacturer who's calibration suite matches up to Samsungs', in terms of extent or accuracy of use. Hats off - again!

The other options found under Advanced Settings all behaved identically to those of the UE-D8000 we tested so Flesh Tone mucked about with the luminance of Magenta. Dynamic Contrast did increasingly wild and wonderful things to the Gamma curve, the further up the scale it was pushed with Shadow Detail affecting the near black gamma. The Shadow Detail control might have served a purpose had the 10 point White Balance controls not performed correctly but, fortunately, they did. We'd advise setting Black Tone to off to avoid clipping shadow detail and we'd also recommend Edge Enhancement is likewise disabled. Finally there's the rather mysterious Motion Lighting and LED Motion Plus settings. The former dynamically alters light output dependent on the extent of activity of the source material, i.e. it lowers output the more action there is on screen. In reality the effect was fairly mild but, nonetheless, we'd also set this to 'off'. The LED Motion Plus setting increases the rate of the side-located LED 'blinking' to increase perceived motion resolution. For us, it didn't really work and actually produced a flicker effect on solid patches of colour - again we switched it off.

In to the Sound Menu and we have a few pre-set modes to choose from - truth be told the onboard speakers are as slim in their sound stage as the chassis is in its depth so choosing a mode is a matter of preference here rather than anything else but we settled on Movie as the most 'rewarding'. There's useful delay setting for SPDIF connected amplification and we found it necessary with just about everything connected to make use of the facility. Having guided you through the potential picture quality marring options we'll just make further note, once more, that gamers looking to reduce input lag will need to delve in to theGeneral area of the System Menu to activate GAME mode. We've already fed back to Samsung our belief that the placement here is totally counter-intuitive and it's being looked in to. The D7000 features Samsung's usual 6 Channel/2 Hour view Electronic Program Guide (EPG). There's a video window, top left of the screen, and the audio channel remains on whilst the EPG is displayed. We like the presentation but perhaps adding a couple more channels would improve things.

Test Results

We've come to expect a good out of the box performance from the Samsungs' MOVIE picture pre-set, in fact it's usually been a reasonable match to ISF/THX modes found in other TVs, and this again proved the case with the UE-D7000. We set our black and white levels optimally for our viewing conditions and took the following measurements. Our aim is to have the red/green/blue lines tracking together, at 100%, in the RGB Balance Graph. By doing so we'll ensure neutrality in the transition from black to white along the greyscale; allowing our colours to be displayed unfettered of any unwanted colour tint. As it happened, the D7000's MOVIE mode was already fairly neutral in its shipped state. The excess of red did mean the image was just a tad too warm but certainly far from unacceptable. Samsung haven't yet seen fit to pay for ISF/THX licensing on their televisions and, to be honest, we're not sure they really need to, at this point, as they already make an excellent fist of providing accuracy and calibration controls in the menus. As with all the sets in the upper tiers of Samsung's ranges, the D7000 comes equipped with both 2 and 10 point White Balance options in the menus so bringing the greyscale in to line should be a reasonably trivial task.

We choose a THX recommended target gamma of 2.2 for our reviews as it's a good fit for our low-light test conditions. In reality the viewing environment is by far the biggest governing factor when choosing a target and this is another area where an experienced calibrator will earn their salt. The gamma tracking is already highly respectable but just a little too low in the dark areas of the picture that means we're losing just a little shadow detail. Again, given the controls available, we should be able to flatten out the response satisfactorily. Moving on to colour performance against the HD Rec.709 standard and we obtained these measurements in the Custom colour space. We chose custom as it's the only option to afford use of the Colour Management System provided.

This is, for the most part, an excellent attempt to hit standards with only the Blue primary looking unlikely to be fully saturated following calibration. The slight off hue performance of the secondary colours will likely be tamed, somewhat, after we get the white balance in to line so the RGB CMS should allow us to obtain excellent results. In reality our major goal, here, is to have the luminance of the colours as close to correct as possible. With Red, Blue and Magenta being fairly seriously dim, there is a muted look to on-screen images; it's fortunate we have individual control of the colours as raising the global Colour slider would have introduced errors in to green - the colour we will notice the errors most in! As it is, in view of past experiences, we enter the calibration menus with a degree of confidence.

In our review of the D8000, we did experience a couple of hiccups using the 10 point White Balance controls, in that altering at one level of stimulus would have an effect on the neighbouring stimuli around the middle of the greyscale. This isn't typical of the excellent Samsung controls and things were back on track with the D7000 we received; as evidenced in the following charts. First using the 2 point white balance controls and then the 10 point to fine tune RGB balance and gamma we were able to calibrate the greyscale to almost total perfection. Delta errors are below 0.5, throughout, with gamma tracking bang on our targeted 2.2 value. Bringing up a stair-step pattern confirms the measurements of neutrality and we're good to move on to tweaking the colour gamut.

Whilst not as an outstanding a result as the greyscale and gamma, the CMS has allowed errors in hue and luminance to be visibly indistinct with Delta E's well below three for all six colours. As we suspected, it proved impossible to fully saturate blue as you can very rarely add in what's not there in the first place. We also had to slightly compromise the saturation of green in order we kept the luminance error down to a negligible level. Errors in luminance are far easier for the eye to spot than those in saturation and we would, frankly, be amazed if even the most demanding of viewer would have any gripes with the UE-D7000's calibrated colour reproduction.

Readers of our recent Samsung reviews could be forgiven for looking away at this point as the UE-D7000 performs with the same excellence we've seen on all the other higher range televisions we've seen from the Korean manufacturer when it comes to picture processing. The heart and brains of the newer Samsung's is their own custom HyperReal chip that really does fly through the majority of our testing regime. Standard definition scaling of both 480i and 576i signals are handled with aplomb with virtually no ringing present when fed anything like a decent bitrate. Well transferred DVDs showed up particularly well and with something like a viewing distance of 8 feet, owners of the 40 inch version of this TV needn't feel the urge to upgrade all of their existing collection to Blu-ray disc.

Progressively shot film based material sent through an interlaced signal again proved trivial for the D7000 bar the extremely obscure 5:5 cadence so we're not losing any unnecessary resolution here. Similarly, deinterlacing of video based content was very good, with fine lines maintained well under, motion, and a distinct lack of jaggies in evidence. We had our issues with Samsung's two-tiered interpolation frame interpolation systems whilst testing the D8000 and, for the most part, the same problems were there; with some inconsistent behaviour when faced with material with sudden and differing changes of pace. Where the D7000 did outperform the D8000 was in use of the Clear Motion Plus setting which has shown improvements that are probably attributable to the interim firmware released between testing.

There was always something about the D8000's motion handling performance that bothered us but we were only able to confirm our thoughts when running one side by side with 3 other TVs from different manufacturers. Even with both standard and LED Motion Plus settings totally disabled, the HyperReal engine is performing some form of motion smoothing. A particularly good example can be found on the Spears and Munsil disc where there's a clip with a boat crossing a choppy sea. The movement of the boat should obviously be - and we apologise for the technical jargon - 'bobby' but the Samsung's are clearly smoothing it out. We saw the same effect in a few choice Blu-ray clips so the processing is clearly doing something to even 24p material and is by far the biggest black mark against the D7000s video processing efforts. It's a curious choice from Samsung and we'd ask for an option to disable it, particularly for 24p material.

Whilst we routinely measure for input lag against a CRT referenced laptop monitor, we also feel that a little too much focus is placed on the numbers. Display lag is only one part of the equation when it comes to the sense of responsiveness during gaming. Before breaking out the camera and stopwatch, we like to get a feel for gaming and the D7000 is what we would describe as perfectly fine for single player gaming for the vast majority of gamers out there. The average measured lag, in the obliquely placed GAME mode, was between 48 and 64 milliseconds, i.e. 3 to 4 frames at 60 frames per second. Add that number on to controller, network and actual game lag and the online competitive gamer could certainly find a more suitable display. Those that are sensitive to input lag know who they are and are forewarned accordingly.

As this particular TV is to be sold as base pre-calibrated by our sponsors MultiZone, we boosted light output just a little more than that of the calibrated D8000, meaning that energy consumption was just a touch higher. In its calibrated state, the UE-D7000 averaged 89w with 0.5w in standby.

Picture Quality - 2D

If the side by side comparisons with other manufacturers TVs did the Samsung no favours when it came to motion handling, the D7000 would certainly come top when tasked with maintaining black levels in a bright environment. Whatever filter Samsung are employing in these TVs does an uncanny job of rejecting light and contrast performance maintains excellently when faced with more challenging viewing environments. There are two caveats to this; firstly although ambient light rejection is excellent, the screen is very reflective so careful consideration of placement will be needed by prospective buyers should they be planning use in a brightly lit room. The second caveat is that the very deep black levels are only maintained from square on to the TV. At around 30 degrees off-centre, black becomes more blue and soon purple as the off-axis angle increases. Colours actually hold up pretty well, out of the sweet spot, but there's no doubt the D7000 offers a far better image on-axis than off.

With the deep blacks and excellent dynamic range coupled with the superb calibrated greyscale and colours, Blu-ray material really came alive on the D7000. The almost floating sense the near transparent bezel affords works very well indeed with the right lighting. Unfortunately, as we found with the D8000, backlighting was again very inconsistent and darker scenes suffered clouding as a result. All four corners were affected in addition to a few patches across the screen. We've seen much better lighting consistency from Panasonic, Sony, Toshiba, LG and Sharp so far this year and it's something that Samsung really need to address, particularly on higher end models attracting premium prices!

Picture Quality - 3D

Again, as per the D8000 review, viewing 3D was mostly a pleasure despite the rather modest proportions of the TV. The extremely thin black frame around the screen gives the eyes just enough reference to allow the effect a great sense of depth. When you add that to the transparency of the bezel, the sense of the design for 3D becomes apparent. We tend to focus on a few reference scenes from 3D Blu-rays during testing and there's no doubt, for us, that if you're considering 3D but can't go 50 inch plus, these 'borderless' designs are worthy of consideration to give the 3D effect a boost.

Exactly as per the D8000 testing, on default settings we did see some crosstalk that was panel rather than source induced. The 3D Effect controls in the Advanced Picture Menu offer a chance to reduce the effect where a setting of zero for the 3D Perspective proved the best balance between reducing crosstalk and blurring the background image. The default of +3 certainly had more depth and clarity to the background but crosstalk was at unacceptable levels, for us, with the setting. Once tweeked, the 3D experience was still very acceptable.

Colour shifting through the glasses wasn't as pronounced as some we've seen and, like the crosstalk performance, an improvement over last year. There was, of course, a large loss of luminance through the lenses but the D7000 can go plenty bright enough to compensate and the glasses have the added bonus of masking some of the backlight clouding.

Features

So crammed full of bells and whistles are the new Samsung Smart TVs that it's almost difficult to no where to begin. In actual fact, it's fairly simple, everything is accessed through the SMART button on the remote control. Pressing the button brings us in to Samsung's Smart Hub that is being rolled out through a large range of Samsung products, including Blu-ray players, Freeview/Freesat recorders, Tablets and even 3D monitors.

Taking pride of place, atop the GUI, is the 'Your Video' section that actually works on a recommendation engine, where your viewing habits are tracked and suggestions based on genre, subject matter, director, actor/actress etc are made for your further viewing delight. The engine will search material from the various VoD services, including iPlayer and YouTube and will shortly add paid for content from the likes of LoveFilm. Habits are tracked from EPG selections, searched for material through the Smart Hub and recordings scheduled using the PVR functions. - the D7000 has the ability to make recordings to external storage via USB and the interface is, again, through the Smart Hub. Although we only had the D7000 for a couple of weeks, the engine did manage to make a couple of useful suggestions so it shows there is, at least, something going on but we expect much bigger things in the future.

There's a couple of other points worth mentioning here. Firstly, a video search will, by default, bring up the highest resolution version of material available from, say, YouTube and that the BBC iPlayer widget allows access to all the currently stored BBC HD content so users wont have to make the quality compromises that are common with other manufacturers' implementations.

As we've previously remarked, we do feel the Smart Hub interface gives the appearance of being a little cluttered but navigation is straightforward enough once you've got to grips with it and just to the right of Your Video sits the Samsung App store. We did manage to get in this time and we were greeted with around 18 choices to download as per the photo to the right. Probably the one most owners will be keen to download is Samsung's own Explore 3D app that gives access to about 20 items of free 3D content and Samsung are hoping to push up the numbers to around 80 before year end. Admittedly most of the material is going to be of a promotional nature but there's some good 3D demo material in there and, hey, it's free and no other manufacturer is currently providing a similar service.

Below Your Video and the App Store runs a set of 'Recommended' apps, widgets, whatever you want to call them and below that, occupying the bottom half of the screen, interfaces for network/USB playback of media files, a Web Browser plus additional ways of accessing the EPG and certain Menu items, for example one could rescan for channels from here. As well as AllShare providing standard DLNA functionality, Samsung have recently released the Smart View app that allows owners of Galaxy S2 Android smartphones to view video sent from the TV via wireless ethernet. The really clever thing here is that the TV doesn't even have to be on or, if it is, the owner is not locked to viewing what's being shown on-screen as another input can viewed simultaneously through the phone. The same support will also be present in the upcoming Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab tablets when they are released later this year.

In addition to the Smart View App, there's also a Smart Remote app available that does exactly what you'd expect in that it can act as a replacement for the cheap, plastic unit supplied. The app is far more convenient for using the included Web Browser that's main noteworthy feature is its ability to play embedded Flash video where competitors don't. The creation of folders for tidying up the Smart Hub by grouping your apps is possible through both the 'Remote' app and standard remote control but is, again, easier using a smartphone. For those that have the urge to video chat through the TV, there's an optional camera/mic available that can be used in tandem with the pre-loaded Skype app with video quality up to 720p. With everything Samsung have crammed in to the Smart Hub, we could probably devote an entire mini review to the subject but we really must get on with checking out some other facets of the D7000!

Verdict

8
AVForumsSCORE
OUT OF
10

Pros

  • Deep Blacks - even in brightly lit rooms
  • Excellent Calibration Controls
  • Much Improved 3D Performance
  • General Video Processing
  • Smart Hub
  • Design
  • Freeview HD

Cons

  • Backlight Issues
  • Undefeatable Motion Smoothing
  • Screen Reflectivity
  • Cheap Remote
  • Too Many Confusing Options in Menus

Samsung D7000 (UE-40D7000) 3D LED LCD Television Review

If the biggest question in this review was, is this the same TV as the D8000 with a different bezel? Then the answer is yes. Aside from a couple of small differences that were likely a question of set up and newer firmware, picture performance was identical so the decision between the two can safely be made on aesthetic grounds. We actually had a chance to speak to a Samsung representative, in person, at the recent event AVForums hosted for THX training and they confirmed this to be the case.

Whilst the Samsung UE-D7000 shares the same tiny dimensions, it has a slightly different appearance to the D8000. The chrome effect bezel is replaced by one that's transparent and we found ourselves preferring the D7000's design, if only for the fact that light didn't so readily bounce and glint off it. The remote control is a continuing source of disappointment but Smartphone users shouldn't worry unduly about that given the apps available. We really like the lack of weight in the supplied 3D specs but, at the same time, we'd also like to see the size of the lenses increased to keep out more light - not that we'd really advise 3D viewing as a daytime event.
The Samsung menus are, as ever, pretty much a pleasure to use but there are far too many confusing and unnecessary picture options that are a minefield for the uninitiated; although the fact there are, at least, some descriptions as to what the various options do - or are supposed to. The calibration suite is as least as good as any of the competitions' and really allows for the dialling in of some excellent results.

Samsung's Smart Hub is, in our opinion, the industry leading standard for these sorts of added functionalities. We really like the fact that all the added extras are centralised and the little touches like folder creation and a built-in video recommendation engine add up to something that is already impressive with the added promise of much more going forwards. We wouldn't mind Samsung bringing in some decluttering experts to sort out the interface but, once you are used to things, it's fairly easy to navigate - remote control use considered. Once calibrated to reference greyscale and gamma with near reference colour performance, the D7000's deep black levels and excellent dynamic range gave images a real pop and thanks to some very clever filtering techniques black levels hold up remarkably well in bright conditions. Unfortunately blacks don't hold up too well off-axis and the screen is highly reflective so some careful thought to placement is needed if daytime viewing is of importance. Samsung's familiar problems with backlight uniformity were again present on the sample although not to the extent of some we've seen. Still, it's a potential issue for those that like to watch in the dark.

Much as with the D8000, our biggest concern with the D7000 was in its motion handling. In actual fact a newer firmware seems to have fixed some of the major hiccups we saw previously but we've been able to identify another issue. Even with all interpolation systems deactivated, the D7000 seems to be performing a motion smoothing process that can, at times, appear very unnatural. It's not a problem that rears its head too often but we'd certainly prefer for it not to be there at all 3D performance was exactly same as seen with the D8000. In short, the almost borderless design really added depth to 3D and, in part, compensated for the modest screen size. We were able to neutralise much of the crosstalk present at default settings in the menus and overall it's a big step up on last year's efforts. There's room for improvement of course but if they keep going at this rate, the inherent advantages plasma technology currently has for delivering 3D will be all but nullified but that's assuming plasma stands still. 3D gaming was the usual blast with the D7000 and it's a decent choice for the non-competitive game too. Lag times were a little on the high side but certainly nothing that would trouble most gamers in single player titles.

The Samsung D7000 has plenty to offer and at increasingly reasonable prices. If you had the D8000 on your radar, the D7000 is most certainly worthy of your consideration as it is just a case of same fella, different hat. If we could ask Samsung to resolve two things; number one would be to up the level of QC/improve transit measures to ensure panels with such uniformity issues don't go in to retail channels in quite the numbers they appear to, given the samples we've received for review here over the last 12 months. We would also like to see an option to defeat the motion smoothing processing that is of particular concern with some Blu-ray material. We gave the D8000 a Recommended award so it would seem logical to do the same for the D7000 although the D8000 was given the badge with an element of 'benefit of the doubt' on backlighting issues. That the D7000 shares the same issue is a real disappointment but it is capable of producing excellent pictures so we'll put Samsung on final warning and Recommend but we'd urge you to choose your retailer wisely in case you need to return.

Recommended

Scores

3D Picture Quality

.
.
.
7

Sound Quality

.
.
.
.
.
5

Smart Features

10

Ease Of Use

.
9

Build Quality

.
9

Value for Money

.
.
8

Verdict

.
.
8

Picture Quality

.
.
8

Video Processing

.
9

Greyscale Accuracy

.
9

Colour Accuracy

.
.
8

Contrast/Dynamic Range/Black Level

.
.
8

Screen Uniformity

.
.
.
7
8
AVForumsSCORE
OUT OF
10

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