LG LX9900 (47LX9900) 3DTV Review

Phil Hinton tests the flagship 3D LED LCD from LG and is pleasantly surprised at the results...

by Phil Hinton
TV Review

35

Recommended
LG LX9900 (47LX9900) 3DTV Review
SRP: £2,400.00

Introduction

LG have come a long way in the last few years when it comes to TV design and features. The Company once regarded as a budget manufacturer has shown the UK market that price isn’t everything when it comes to TV technology. Indeed, when looking at the LX range of LED LCD models, some may be forgiven for almost choking when you read the price tag. So, is this a new up market approach from the company?

One thing that LG have consistently done over the last three years is make sure that not only do their products offer excellent image quality and value for money, but they are also stuffed with the latest technology. LG are the most consistent brand when it comes to offering full calibration and set up options, along with neat features like Bluetooth and Net video. So, with that in mind, we are not surprised this flagship model has cutting edge technology like active shutter 3D playback and full array LED backlighting with local dimming; as well as a price tag to match. So is this flagship model the best yet from LG? Let’s find out!

Styling and connections

“Oh to be slim,” something I find myself wishing for on a regular basis, but also, the latest trend in TV design. It appears that almost every TV manufacturer on the planet is aiming for size zero in the TV chassis stakes and the LX9900 is no exception. With the introduction of EDGE LED backlighting on LCD TVs, manufacturers have been able to flex their design flair and aim for ever slimmer products. Indeed, up until just last year there seemed to be a press release issued on a monthly basis claiming some TV, somewhere in the world, was now the slimmest yet. Thankfully that rush to be the slimmest seems to have reached its end game but LG have managed to take the concept one step further with the LX9900, as it keeps the edge LED slimness, but with a full array LED Backlight design.

Unlike EDGE LED, where the backlight is positioned to the edge of the screen, full array LED backlighting places the LEDs directly behind the LCD panel. Added to this layout is local dimming technology that has the LEDs arranged in small individual groups that can be dimmed separately from each other group. This allows flexibility of the backlight system to match the content on screen better than a backlight that is constantly on (as with EDGE LED and traditional CCFL designs). So when you get a mixed scene of bright and dark objects at the same time, the areas that should be black have the LEDs dimmed to match the content and, of course, switched on in the bright areas. This approach also depends on how many separate groups of LEDs you have behind the screen; the more groups you have then the more control over how the image is made up. I would guess the aim for future development of this technology will be to have each separate LED acting like an individual pixel in the image. Funnily enough this is exactly what Plasma does at this very moment in time.

The downside to the full array LED approach is that like CCFL designs it requires space behind the LCD panel, which should equate to a thicker chassis than EDGE LED designs. However, this is where LG have been clever with their Infinia design as the LX9900 looks just as slim as some EDGE LED HDTVs on the market. Added to this is one of the slimmest bezels ever to appear on a consumer LCD TV, which almost has the entire screen image touching the extreme edge of the frame on three sides. Indeed, the side and top bezel measure just less than 1 inch with the bottom bezel hitting just under 2 inches. To the extreme edge the bezel turns from black to a see-through clear finish. With the LX9900 sitting next to our reference LX5090 plasma, the Pioneer looks flabby, chunky and out of date and, boy, do I relate to that!

Adding to the slim looks and extreme bezel dimensions is the LG one sheet of glass approach. As it sounds, this has one sheet of glass across the entire length of the front of the TV, giving it a borderless look. (Finally last year's advertising line from LG makes some sense). And the design flair doesn’t stop there, as no buttons or logos are placed anywhere on the front of the panel, with even the LG logo on the bottom bezel hidden until the TV is switched on – where the logo then lights up but remains far from distracting in doing so.

Also included in the box with the LX9900 is a table top stand that requires a few minutes assembly time to attach to the screen. This is also well designed to fit the looks of the panel, with a glass bottom and clear see-through stand attachment.

There are two remote controls supplied with the LX9900. The first is a normal looking unit that houses all the direct access buttons you would expect to see. This is well laid out and easy to use with only the EPG guide button feeling out of place at the bottom of the unit. The remote sits easily in your hand and is intuitive to use. The second remote is a different breed altogether and is a thin designed unit with buttons for volume, channels and an off key. The remaining OK button activates an on-screen pointer when selected for the magic motion feature. This works in the same way as the Wii controller and allows you to make selections on menus, select devices and even play games on the TV. This is certainly a neat feature that will appeal to many users against using the larger more common remote control.
Moving to the slim rear of the panel, we are greeted by the source connections. For such a slim display it seems odd that the four HDMI v1.4 slots are facing outwards meaning that a flush wall mount will not be possible (even if you resort to 90 degree extension blocks – although slot four is on the side of the panel). Much is the same for the one component, Scart, VGA, composite, LAN and audio jacks. There are two break-out cables for adding additional component inputs but these seem like an afterthought, given that the main HDMI inputs will still stick out a fair degree at the rear. For servicing and control there is an RS232 slot.

The last items to remove from the box are two pairs of active shutter glasses for watching 3D content. These are actually well designed and comfortable units that feel robust and not that heavy. They are certainly much better than the Panasonic glasses which caused a few issues with comfort and weight. The only slight niggle I have is that there is not a lot of room for putting these over any glasses you might wear normally. Perhaps this is something that could be addressed for future designs. The best feature of all, with the included 3D glasses, is that they are rechargeable by USB so you never need to worry about replacing the batteries. This is an excellent idea and one that will prove to be popular over the competing systems out there.

The last items to remove from the box are two pairs of active shutter glasses for watching 3D content. These are actually well designed and comfortable units that feel robust and not that heavy. They are certainly much better than the Panasonic glasses which caused a few issues with comfort and weight. The only slight niggle I have is that there is not a lot of room for putting these over any glasses you might wear normally. Perhaps this is something that could be addressed for future designs. The best feature of all, with the included 3D glasses, is that they are rechargeable by USB so you never need to worry about replacing the batteries. This is an excellent idea and one that will prove to be popular over the competing systems out there.

Menus and Set up

LG have always excelled in making their menu systems easy to use and that is certainly the case with the LX9900. We are greeted with the now common large main menu that uses graphics to easily depict the options available. The main picture menu is well laid out and offers the type of control and set up you would expect from a flat panel TV. Here are the usual selections for the main picture set up starting with the picture mode.

There are predefined picture presets ranging from Vivid (ouch), Standard, Cinema, Sport, Game and two ISF Expert selections. The eagle-eyed out there will notice that there is no THX Cinema or THX Bright Room presets on the UK version of the LX9900. This is somewhat disappointing and, when asked about this omission, LG UK told us that they didn’t have time to send the TV for THX appraisal due to the fact it needed to have the Freeview HD tuners installed. This is unfortunate as the LX9900 is supposed to be the flagship model and we would have expected it to carry an accurate preset for image quality out of the box. What might make this decision even more galling for UK consumers is the fact the Euro model (LX9500) is THX certified. On the LX9900 we are left with a Cinema preset which we will measure later to see how accurate this is towards the picture standards.

The picture menus are also certified by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and include two expert selections. These can be used by a professional ISF calibrator or an enthusiast with the correct tools to calibrate the image to Industry Standards. These extra menus provide further picture set up selections that cannot just be set by eye, but require the use of a meter and software.

The LX9900 features a full 10 point Greyscale option so that each step of the Greyscale can be individually set allowing RGB fine tuning not seen on many other consumer TVs. This allows the image to achieve the perfect White Balance for content you watch at the desired D65 level. Also included are presets for Gamma reproduction and a 2D Colour Management System (CMS). This should allow the LX9900 to be fully calibrated to the correct levels for TV and Film playback.

The LG also allows pixel mapping of HD signals and this should be set up on each input where you are feeding the TV an HD source. This is done by selecting the Just Scan option in the aspect ratio menu. For those who also watch a lot of SD material it may be an idea to set the tuner to 16:9 which adds in about 5% overscan hiding the white lines and other sync code hidden at the far edges of SD programming (Unless you select HD channels where you will want to have just scan selected).

Features

As with all TVs from LG the LX9900 is packed with quite a list of extra features. The most obvious with this set is the inclusion of 3D playback. This is an active designed TV which means that the TV sends out a sync code to the active glasses to sync them with the 3D images. The TV is capable of playing back side by side, top & bottom and sequential 3D signals. This means it is fully compatible with the SKY broadcast system and with Full HD 3D Blu-ray. For this review we used the LG BX580 3D Blu-ray player, which in itself is a very nice looking player that also performed well with normal and 3D content, plus we also used our SKY HD 1TB box which had the 3D channel activated.

Another piece of technology developed for the LX9900 is its 400Hz Trumotion scanning backlight frame interpolation system. This is claimed to work with the localised dimming of the LED backlight to help produce interpolated frames that improves image flicker and motion blur. As with any system like this; its use will be very much user dependant and down to personal taste, as it changes the look and feel of video and film material in quite an obvious manner.

Like most manufacturers this year, LG has also added its own online content system called Netcast. This is designed to develop over the life of the TV to add further content on top of the already available ACCU Weather, YouTube and Picasa widgets. The addition of further material is promised over the rather limited offerings available at the time of writing this review. It can be accessed by either using the built-in Ethernet connection or by purchasing an optional wireless dongle to connect to the internet. Rounding up the features is a simplink CEC function for using LG sources such as their 3D Blu-ray player, allowing control over HDMI. Plus you can access your server content using the DLNA compliant features of the LX9900.

Test Results

As always, in this section of the review, we want to find the best out of the box settings that get as close as possible to the Industry Standards for film and TV playback. Because this LG doesn’t have a THX mode available in the picture menu, this means that the next best settings would be to select the Cinema mode or expert. For this review I chose the Cinema mode with colour temperature set to warm and the main controls set up using the usual test patterns for Brightness, Sharpness and Contrast. The measurements were run a few times on this TV with local dimming switched off and switched on. While we would normally measure with picture enhancements such as local dimming switched off, we found that on the LX9900 the dimming is paramount to the TV offering its best dynamic range and picture quality. With it switched off the set produced a raised black level that affected the low end of the image. Because of this we decided that after many tests in both modes, the results were very close to each other, but dimming switched on gave the most consistent overall results.

Starting with the Greyscale and we are looking for the red, green and blue lines in the RGB balance chart to converge together on the 100% line. As we can see green is high at 10% over and red is low by about the same margin. Only blue tracks close to the 100% point on the graph, where we want all three to merge. This illustrates that on-screen images will have a green cast to them (this was easy to see with normal content). However the plus point here with our results is that all three points are uniform in their tracking, i.e. they are almost straight lines from the low end to the high. This should mean that by using the 10 point correction, included in the expert menus, we should be able to calibrate the Greyscale accurately. While the results here are not bad they are visible on screen with a green cast to the image. This result differs from the LE8900 that Steve reviewed recently which had the THX preset available. So again we have to ask why THX is missing here?

Next we look at the Colour Gamut performance of the LX9900, an area that is often ignored by some who assess TV image quality. This graph shows how the colours relate to the standards set down for colour reproduction of TV and Film material. As you can see in the Gamut CIE chart there is a triangle that represents the Rec.709 colour points for HD and Pal material. This says in two dimensions where the primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (cyan, magenta and yellow) colours should be. These points are represented on the chart with little boxes at the correct points. The dark circles represent where the actual colours are measured to be within that 2D space. The central black dot represents the white point that was also shown in the Greyscale chart. We can see by looking at the chart that cyan, yellow and red are not where they should be. We can also see that the white point is high above the black curve line which mirrors the result of the greyscale graphs. When we correct the greyscale (white balance) during our calibration this should bring that point down to sit on the black curve line and also (hopefully) correct the secondary errors we see.

The other important boxes on our measurement screen above are the luminance points for the primary and secondary colours. These points are in fact more important to get right than the points on the 2D CIE chart. This is because the luminance charts are the third dimension of our results and affect how bright those colour points are. They could line up perfectly on the CIE chart where we want them, but if the luminance (brightness) of that colour is too high then that error will be more obvious when we view normal material on screen. We need to look at both the overall Gamut Luminance box and the DeltaL box to see our luminance errors. The grey bars are the brightness of the colour they are next to and the DeltaL chart shows us the errors associated with that colour. We want the grey bars as close as possible to the same height as the colour and the DeltaL results as close to 0 as possible. The last two boxes (DeltaC and DeltaH) represent the saturation and hue errors of the colours and reflect what we see in the main CIE chart.
So after that quick explanation, we can see that luminance is high on all the colour points, but it is under 4 which can be considered a good result but errors are likely to be seen when watching normal on-screen material. The overall DeltaE 1994 results give us the overall errors and we can see that they are under 5 which is again a good result, but we should be able to get them a lot better with calibration.

In terms of watching material, out of the box, the results show that the colours should look natural enough, with just a slight green cast caused by a greyscale that is not quite perfect. This shouldn’t affect viewing too much in the Cinema mode and it is our recommended setting for watching all material out of the box on this TV. All the remaining picture modes (barring the expert modes which are identical to Cinema for Greyscale and Colour Gamut), produced results that were far in excess of the desired points to match the picture with the content you will watch on the TV.

Looking at the Greyscale results, first we can see that the uniform tracking seen in the out of the box settings, along with full 10 point control, has allowed us to obtain reference level results. From the 10IRE stimulus point all the way to 100IRE the greyscale is perfectly flat and our DeltaE errors are under 0.5, which means that no errors will be visible to the eye. Our only slight error, and one we cannot fix without full manual controls, is the Gamma tracking. This is slightly high at 10IRE and low at 60IRE before levelling off towards 2.2 at the high end. This is not a result that will overly affect images apart from some slight shadow detailing at the very low end.

And the same can be said for the Colour Gamut. They are reference level in our opinion. We can see that the most important element of a correct gamut, Luminance, is almost bang on with just yellow showing an error of 1. This will not be seen when playing normal content on the TV. If we look at the CIE chart, we can see that the white point is now correct and the secondary points are also corrected due to that and, some slight use of the CMS system. Only red gave us any real issue and in the end this was balanced using the CMS so that luminance was corrected first which gave us a slight deltaC error of 2, but again this will not likely be noticed with normal viewing.

Overall the results here are reference level and show why a pro calibration would be a must to get the best out of the LX9900 for watching content as it should be seen.

Video Processing

The video processing on the LX9900 was a bit hit and miss with the majority of tests performed. The biggest issue was the lack of correct 2:2 cadence detection with film material and a slight lack of jaggies suppression with diagonal deinterlacing on SD material. Both these issues were highlighted using the usual test material. Scaling, on the other hand, was processed correctly giving a pleasing image with no added edge enhancements, blurring or ringing. Only occasionally were jaggies seen with SD material. Unsurprisingly even though 2:2 detection was not present, the LG did resolve the NTSC centric 3:2 cadence.

With HD material the LG managed to cope with 1080i material well with no signs of behind the scenes processing. Plus the playback of 24p Blu-ray was very good with no induced judder with film content. In the past some LG displays have added unwanted sharpening to HD images, even with the edge enhancement and sharpness controls set correctly. Thankfully, on the LX9900, there is no such issue with HD material looking pin sharp without any added extras.

Moving to the Trumotion 400Hz processing, this was entertaining if not for the right reasons. As with any frame interpolation system, motion was improved but with that came the usual ‘soap opera’ digital camera look. With film material, in SD or HD, the content looked like it had been shot on cheap digital cameras and had an unrealistic feel with motion. Scenes from the latest 'Star Trek' film on Blu-ray were a perfect example, where the camera is supposed to be handheld and moving around as if you are in the scene with the actors. This look was completely destroyed by the Trumotion system with the jerky camera moves gone and replaced with a smooth TV studio look that completely killed the atmosphere and intended look of the film. We would therefore recommend that Trumotion remains off for film playback. Where it might be useful, in the lowest setting, is with TV material such as some sports footage. Here it can look reasonable, but again I personally could tell processing was going on behind the scenes and preferred to leave the system switched off.

The LX9900 managed to resolve 600 moving lines of resolution with additional processing switched off, and 1080 lines with the Trumotion switched on. However, although that result appears great for an LCD, the downside was excessive image artefacts with the Trumotion system engaged. So while it may resolve 1080 lines it does so with serious side effects. The use of the Trumotion 400Hz system is really going to be a personal call and our advice would be to use it sparingly with TV content and not at all with film. At least there is a choice to have it on or off.

Gaming Performance

Gaming performance on the LX9900 comes in two flavours. The most appealing is in 3D with the small number of titles available on some consoles. This is a great experience and is where we feel that 3D should really take off as it adds that extra sense of immersive game play. But if you want to stick with your normal 2D game titles then the lag time of the LX9900 is a quite average 35ms in the games preset.

Energy Consumption

Ignoring the many eco features on the LX9900 which will affect the consumption in varying amounts, although for accurate images we would recommend they are left off, the LG still manages to be up to three times more efficient than the latest eco Plasma screens. In Cinema mode, with localised dimming switched on, we measured 0IRE at 78 watts, 50IRE at 80 watts and 100IRE at 84 watts. In calibrated mode the results were 80, 84 and 88 watts respectively. In standby the LX9900 uses just 1 watt.

Picture Quality – 2D

Starting with the out of the box setting of Cinema mode and the main controls set for our viewing environment, the LG produces some really respectable results in terms of image accuracy. There is a green cast visible within the image which points to the out of the box greyscale results and this can be seen with all content. For the vast majority of users this will not be an issue and colour reproduction is very good with the majority of material. In the Cinema mode there is no over the top colour reproduction as everything looked natural and pretty accurate to the source material. The strong point with the localised dimming is that contrast performance is really very good, with nice rich black levels and whites that remain strong but not overblown or clipped.

There are however a couple of small niggles that do concern us when watching the LX9900. The first is that with uniform images, such as football pitches in wide shots you can see the backlight layout which looks like light source banding in certain areas of the screen. This is noticeable when looking for issues and it may very well annoy some users. However, this was never a particularly distracting aspect to viewing material on the LG, we mention it for completeness of our viewing assessment. The other issue is with the viewing angle of the TV. Whilst it does use an IPS panel, the localised dimming backlight can introduce some halos which are quite noticeable from viewing angles of more than 30 degrees. So whilst most viewing from directly in front of the screen is pretty solid, with only very slight halos seen with tricky material now and again, the further off-axis you view the more the issue becomes apparent. This is down to the way the LED backlighting works and there is nothing you can do to resolve this issue; it’s inherent to the design.

In calibrated mode the LG really does produce an excellent and accurate image that has plenty of punch and a natural colour palette. Blacks are rich and skin tones represent what you are supposed to see within your content. Only in the deepest areas of black does shadow detailing start to disappear but the overall image, for an LCD, is very good indeed. There are drawbacks, as mentioned with viewing angles and slight halos, so make sure this set will fit within the layout of your viewing environment.

The above assessment is with the localised dimming switched on, but the same is also true for having this switched off. The obvious drawback of that is the lack of deep black levels as the whole screen is now a normal backlit LCD. In this mode, blacks are not as deep and contrast performance does suffer. However, colour reproduction and Greyscale performance (when calibrated) is still very good if not perfect. We would suggest using the dimming if you are seated within the sweet spot of the off-axis viewing arc.

The LG is capable of producing very good image quality with many strong points; it will provide the kind of performance required of a main living room TV, with some slight reservations over viewing angles, backlight banding and halos. We would as always suggest you demo the TV for yourself to gauge how important or not those slight reservations are to you. Potential purchasers should also examine the glass frontage of the TV for reflections if placing this set in an overly bright room.

Picture Quality – 3D

Next we move on to the 3D capabilities of the LX9900 with the help of some 3D gaming, Sky 3DTV and Full HD Blu-ray, using the LG BX580 player.

There has been some discussion regarding industry standards for 3D playback in the home and, as yet, none have been formalised. This is due to the image needing plenty of light to combat the drop in brightness when wearing the 3D glasses, whilst also being able to produce a balanced Greyscale and Colour Gamut as with 2D images. It is right to assume that when the content is produced and authored, it is done so with the same equipment and standards in place, like normal 2D content. However, this doesn’t take into account the brightness that will be required for use with the glasses. There is a suggestion that we should calibrate the image through the glasses to take this into account, however, only professional calibrators or reviewers with expensive non-contact meters would be able to attempt this, so it becomes a moot point for the end user at this moment in time as they will not be able to follow suit. Plus we also don’t feel that the current standards can be applied with the issue of brightness due to various technical restraints. As such, and until there is a standard available to match, we will review the 3DTV’s we get for review in the same set up options consumers have with any 3DTV they buy.

For this review we found that the calibrated modes for 2D were too dull to fully experience the 3D aspects of the image and, as such, we sacrificed the calibrated mode for the standard picture preset for 3D playback. This takes into account the light drop off when using the glasses and that some colour shift will take place.

The 3D experience produced by the LX9900 is appealing with no obvious issues to take you out of the experience. However, watching during the day or in a bright room, does show up the glasses flickering at the high refresh rate. This is not as visible in a dim viewing environment. With Blu-ray movie material such as ‘Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs’, there are very few instances of crosstalk and the image appears crisp and well detailed. Colour balance on most material is also acceptable and at no time did it distract by being over saturated or too vivid in its reproduction.

Switching to the Sky TV material and this is where things can vary in terms of image performance. With football coverage in 3D the instances of crosstalk (ghosting images caused by slow response time), are more prevalent and easier to notice in normal viewing. I also noticed a little more flicker with side by side material but this could just be down to personal perception and is something that should be demoed.

The glasses used are more comfortable than the Panasonic glasses and felt lighter. They are also rechargeable which is a big plus point if you plan on using the 3D modes on a regular basis. The only downside to the LG approach is that if you start to turn the glasses to the side, the image gets darker. If you lie down on the sofa, with the glasses at 90 degrees, you will see nothing as the glasses go black at this angle. So if you want to enjoy the full 3D experience with the LG glasses, you need to sit up straight. This is not an issue with the Panasonic approach. LG also need to be congratulated in providing two pairs of glasses in the box, but again if you have a large family it is going to cost you around £60-£100 per extra pair.

Whilst not perfect, and with some obvious signs of crosstalk with certain material, the overall 3D experience is one that will appeal to those who want the technology now and the LX9900 produces a very serviceable 3D effect. However, we felt that the LG just lags behind the Panasonic VT20 for overall 3D quality with all available material and it's lack of crosstalk effects.

Verdict

7
AVForumsSCORE
OUT OF
10

Pros

  • Cinema mode offers respectable image quality out of the box that gets pretty close to being accurate
  • This is a beautifully designed HDTV
  • Magic Motion remote control actually works and is not just a gimmick
  • Reference level Greyscale performance when calibrated
  • Reference level Colour Gamut performance when calibrated
  • Excellent black levels with localised dimming
  • Good screen uniformity with the LED backlight system
  • Full ISFccc controls
  • Good quality 3D playback with most content
  • Two pairs of 3D glasses included in the box
  • Comfortable and rechargeable 3D glasses.
  • Freeview HD tuner
  • Excellent menu system

Cons

  • Off-axis viewing introduces visible halos around objects due to localised dimming.
  • Some crosstalk visible with 3D viewing
  • No THX preset modes!
  • Deinterlacing and cadence detection could be better
  • Limited Netcast features
  • Games input lag could be better
  • Some slight backlight banding visible
  • Expensive!

LG LX9900 (47LX9900) 3DTV Review

The LX9900 is an impressive display for a number of reasons. It is a beautiful object to look at with its slim design and super thin bezel, plus it has neat features like the magic motion remote and full calibration controls. It uses the latest LED technology that doesn’t impact on image quality in any great way, and it can produce some pretty solid, accurate looking images. It is also the first 3DTV to be released by LG for consumers and offers a very good 3D experience with a range of content that only occasionally suffers from artefacts like crosstalk.

However, as with every TV on the market, there are issues to be aware of. The glass screen can be extremely reflective in a bright room, there are issues with backlight banding on some uniform images, and off-axis viewing can produce halo effects that are visible from about 30 degrees or more to the screen. These issues may not be a big deal for the vast majority of users but if you consider yourself a videophile, who has to have a screen for absolute accurate viewing, you may be better looking elsewhere for absolute image quality.

The other issue to think about is the value of the 3D playback of this TV. If you are just not interested in 3D, but want the same slim design and image quality, you are probably better looking at the LE8900. This is basically the same TV but without the 3D technology, although the LE8900 does also have the more accurate THX picture preset out of the box, which the LX9900 doesn’t offer. As they say the choice is yours.

Overall I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of 2D image on offer from the LX9900 and its good 3D playback skills. It’s not perfect, and it does cost a lot, but if you want good accurate images, a nice slim design and 3D to boot, we recommend you go and demo the LX9900.

Recommended

Scores

Contrast/Dynamic Range/Black Level

.
.
8

Screen Uniformity

.
.
8

Colour Accuracy

.
9

Greyscale Accuracy

.
9

Video Processing

.
.
.
7

Picture Quality

.
.
8

3D Picture Quality

.
.
.
7

Sound Quality

.
.
.
.
.
5

Smart Features

.
.
.
7

Build Quality

.
.
.
7

Ease Of Use

.
.
8

Value for Money

.
.
.
7

Verdict

.
.
.
7
7
AVForumsSCORE
OUT OF
10

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