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Simply Red Review

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by AVForums Mar 1, 2005 at 12:00 AM

    Shot during Simply Red's 1992 sell out world tour, 'A Starry Night' is a live recording of one of their dates in Hamburg, Germany. Shot on film, the show has been re-edited and re-mastered in 5.1 Surround Sound. The tracklisting includes an additional nine songs which were not available on the original video realise.

    As pop concerts go, 'A starry Night' is a good concert DVD. The concert is well shot with plenty of nice angles giving a good view of the band, the crowd, and of course, old ginger barnet himself Mick Hucknall. Before the concert starts you get a warning about flashing lights and epilepsy which made me worried that this was going to be an headache inducing, over-edited MTV style frenzy, but thankfully it's not. The director shows restraint in the editing, allowing you to get a good view of the action before moving on to a different angle. Pretty much everything you'd want to see in a concert is covered. The crowd seem very happy and do plenty of singing and the usual lighter waving. All in all, it's a good document of Simply Red's live act in that period and finds them in great form. Despite being thirteen years old, the concert does not look dated either fashion wise or musically, or the in way it was filmed. Then again, Simply Red never really followed fashion, a modern day concert would probably look the same apart from expanded waistlines and some wrinkles here and there. The star of the show is Mick Hucknall and he belts out his tunes with gusto. The banter inbetween songs is kept to a minimum, no Bono style diatribes here, Hucknall just keeps the songs coming. The concert is suitable for both fans and casual listeners as there's a good mix of hits like 'Stars' and 'A New Flame', and slightly less familiar tunes like 'Freedom' and 'Your Mirror'. There are twenty one tracks spread over a hundred minutes so there's plenty to listen to. And the nine extra songs included on this release means it's well worth upgrading if you own it on VHS. There's a lot of tunes on here that you forgot you knew. It's easy to forget that Simply Red were never off Top of the Pops or Radio One in the early nineties. The DVD menu is nice and simple, and the chapters wisely correspond with a song title just like a CD, so you can skip to your favourite straightaway.