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Finlux 42F8075-T LED TV Review

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by Mark Hodgkinson Feb 28, 2014

  • Home AV review

    12,631

    Finlux 42F8075-T LED TV Review
    SRP: £449.00

    What is the Finlux F8075?

    The last Finlux TV we had in for review was the direct predecessor to the model we have before us now.

    The F8073-T impressed us with its all-round qualities and general signs of improvement and we're hoping the 42-inch F8075-T continues that trend. There is also a 50F8075-T and, jointly, the pair currently sit top of the Finlux range of Smart TVs.
    Like many, Finlux seems to be abandoning the notion of 3D, which we're not complaining about, and we know they will shortly have an Ultra HD model for us to assess. This TV is so new that it isn't even featured on the manufacturer's website yet, so it's down to us to deliver the nitty-gritty.

    Design & Connections

    The F8075T doesn't exactly buck the trend of modern-day TV design with its very narrow charcoal grey bezel and Samsung-esque four footed stand, which swivels quite generously. We've never been keen on that particular style of stand and they do look odd with either a soundbar or centre speaker placed in front but you pays yer money and you makes yer own mind up.

    The 42F8075-T is considerably slimmer than the outgoing model, however, which will find favour in some quarters. The trade-off is that it only has 3 HDMI ports - against 4 for the old model - but we guess that's sufficient for most, if not us. Other connections include singular Scart and Component inputs, 2 USB and an Ethernet port. The F8075 also comes with an USB WiFi dongle - more on which later.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Design & Connections
    Finlux 42F8075-T Design & Connections

    The slightly concave remote control has had a slight makeover but still features big and bold buttons, which makes finding the appropriate one relatively easy, although some of the icons used are hardly self-explanatory. it has a bulky feel - for good or bad - but the new dedicated keys for Netflix and YouTube are welcome additions.

    Menus

    The F8075-T retains the same layout and black/gold colour scheme of the previous models we've seen and, overall, we generally like it. The options load and transition with pleasing speed, although the initial scan for digital channels seemed to take an age.

    The Picture Menus are unchanged from the last time we looked and include Dynamic, Natural, Cinema and Game Picture modes along with the standard font-panel Brightness, Contrast and Colour options. There are some more exotic items under the Advanced Picture Menu, including Dynamic Contrast, Film Mode and a very basic one-point white balance controls - labelled as RGB Gain – and we’ll look at the efficacy, or otherwise, of those later in the review.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Menus
    Finlux 42F8075-T Menus


    Not a huge array of connected features but some vital services are present.

    Features

    Setting up the WiFi dongle and connection of the 42F8070-T was one of the more frustrating processes we've had to endure recently. Inserting it in to the top port on the side connection panel yielded no joy whatsoever, despite, the TV 'recognising it was present, whilst we had to fight with the advanced network settings to get it to work in the lower placed port. There is an option in there named IP Address which should have toggle from the default Dynamic configuration but doesn't, so you're basically down to potluck as to whether it is on or off. Having eventually stumbled on the right set of options, WiFi performance was reasonable from a distance of 8 metres (2 walls) although the Internet Speed Test present in the Menu also doesn't work.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Features
    Finlux 42F8075-T Features

    Finlux has definitely spruced up the appearance of its internet hub and all the tiles are now filled with Smart TV features. The two most used Smart TV apps are covered with both YouTube and BBC iPlayer in attendance and there's a very decent Netflix app present for we streaming types. The internet browser - like most in a TV - is no great shakes but social networkers are well catered for with apps for both Facebook and Twitter. There's also a Skype app but you'll need a camera/mic peripheral to avail yourselves of that.

    Calibration

    Pre Calibration

    It is usually the case with the Finlux TVs that a Picture Mode of Cinema together with a Colour Temp of Warm yields the most accurate out of box results. That wasn’t the case with the F8075 and we found the Cinema/Normal combo to be closest, not that it was great. There is a large excess of blue in the greyscale and gamma is tracking too ‘low’ but at least the colours were fairly close to the Rec.709 standard.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration

    Post Calibration

    The Finlux calibration controls are very basic and not especially good but we did manage to salvage a respectable greyscale performance out of the TV with Delta Errors reduced to acceptable levels, almost throughout the scale. Close to black is noticeably blue but, then again, many LED TVs have this trait and in the more noticeable areas (mid to high scale), there was a good degree of neutrality.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration

    Colours improved further following the greyscale calibration and, as we can see from the chart top-right, both primaries and secondary’s were under the tolerable threshold of 3, in terms of dE’s. We can also see from the CIE diagram below that colours were tracking superbly at lower stimuli, which is equally – if not more – important to the performance at full saturation levels.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration
    Contrast, Black Levels and Screen Uniformity

    Whilst the numbers here don’t stack up particularly impressively, we found black levels and contrast performance to be decent for a fairly brightly lit room. An ANSI checkerboard pattern revealed average black levels of 0.109 cd/m2 against average peak white of 88.23 cd/m2, yielding an ANSI contrast of 807:1. Like we say, not a big number but the filter is very good at rejecting ambient light and, most importantly, screen uniformity was very good for a low-cost TV.
    Finlux 42F8075-T Calibration
    Video Processing

    On paper, the F8075-T handles standard definition content quite well with little ringing evident on the SMPTE-RP133 test pattern but real-world performance was not so good. It also can’t detect a 2:2 cadence so you’ll want a player to be taking care of any scaling for those DVDs you’re harbouring. Video deinteralcing at 1080i50 wasn’t all that hot, either, and Blu-rays encoded at 1080p24 suffered from infrequent skipping although, to be fair, it wasn’t hugely noticeable. It’s clear the engineers at Vestel still have some catching up to do in this department.

    Energy Consumption

    Standby: 0W
    The following measurements were taken with a full screen 50% white pattern:
    Out-of-the-Box – Natural Mode: 48W
    Calibrated – Calibrated Cinema Mode: 47W

    Gaming Performance

    The 42F8075-T would certainly make a decent choice for a dedicated gaming room with a relatively low latency to input of 31.5 milliseconds, which is under a frame with a game running at 30 frames per second. That was achieved in the dedicated Game Mode but the others were only a couple of milliseconds more so you could take your pick. That siad, they would take you in that next frame so it could affect you in twitch shooters or fighting games.

    Processing is again patchy but screen uniformity was truly impressive.

    Finlux F8075-T Picture Quality

    We tend to sit quite close when assessing a TVs picture quality for review but that will do you no favours with the Finlux 42F8075, as it has a very processed look when viewed from anywhere inside 6 feet. That’s probably not a major concern for most but it’s not a quality we particularly like either. Things certainly improve from a bit further out although the weak handling of standard definition content will mean you’ll need to be quite some distance away if viewing it is to be remotely palatable.

    The strongest suit of the Finlux is in its very accurate colour handling and this generally shines through with the majority of content. Most aspects of the picture just look right, although the patchy greyscale tracking is evident with brightish whites and near black where the excess of blue/red – depending on Colour Temp selected – becomes very evident

    Quite a processed look to images but colours are impressively accurate.

    As we said above, the F8075-T isn’t possessed of strong black levels nor mighty dynamic range but the filter does well in the daytime and when the living room lights are on full beam. In low light conditions, blacks take on a greyish-blue hue and the lack of definition in the shadows becomes more evident.

    Viewing angles are fairly decent for LED/LCD but motion handling is typically weak for the technology. Thankfully – and commendably – screen uniformity in this panel was excellent, however, so watching fast-paced action like sports was not a painful experience – once you’ve adjusted to the blur. We’ve had the latest and greatest 4K TVs through our doors these last few months and the Finlux had better uniformity than all but one of those. No names, no pack drill.

    Finlux F8075-T Video Review


    Conclusion

    7
    AVForumsSCORE
    OUT OF
    10

    Pros

    • Excellent colour accuracy
    • Very impressive screen uniformity
    • Good in a brighter room
    • Well priced

    Cons

    • Processed look to pictures
    • Black levels could be better
    • Video processing is patchy
    • Not a huge array of smart features
    • Calibration controls almost non-existent
    You own this Total 0
    You want this Total 0
    You had this Total 0

    Finlux 42F8075-T LED TV Review

    The Finlux 42F8075-T is a very sleek television with an ultra-thin chassis and a charcoal grey narrow bezel surrounding the gloss black screen. The remote control is more the opposite but its concave shape helps it rest easily in the hand and the new dedicated buttons for Netflix and YouTube are welcomed. We're not so keen on the idea of shedding an HDMI port, however, reducing the count to three.

    Finlux supplies a USB WiFi dongle in the box which is handy for accessing the internet features, if ridiculously contrived to set up. Said smart TV features are far from comprehensive but there are some key services present, including BBC iPlayer, Skype Facebook and Twitter, as well as those named above with their own keys on the remote.

    Video processing is clearly not Finlux's string suit and handling of both SD and interlaced signals leaves a little something to be desired. In fairness, most probably wont spot the substandard deinterlacing in 1080i content so the Freeview HD tuner is definitely a bonus. A bigger plus point, still, is the fabulous colour accuracy, although we'd have liked more accurate controls to get the greyscale tracking uniformly.

    The 8075-T is probably best as a candidate for a brighter room where its lack of contrast and weakish black levels can't really be spotted and it has an effective filter, too, which combats ambient light very well. A special mention must go to the superb screen uniformity in the panel supplied as it put to shame LED/LCD's we've reviewed costing 10 times the price.

    All in all, the Finlux F8075-T is a very decent performer, even it isn’t going to set the World alight with its image quality but then it’s a low-cost alternative and we shouldn’t expect it to do so. It’s certainly represents value in this sector of the market and its one to consider if you're after a budget Smart TV.


    The Rundown

    Contrast/Dynamic Range/Black Level

    6

    Screen Uniformity

    8

    Colour Accuracy

    9

    Greyscale Accuracy

    7

    Video Processing

    6

    2D Picture Quality

    7

    Sound Quality

    6

    Smart Features

    6

    Build Quality

    7

    Ease Of Use

    7

    Value for Money

    7

    Verdict

    7

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