Video streaming will boost 5G uptake predicts report

Is video streaming 5G’s killer app?

by Andy Bassett
Movies & TV News

Video streaming will boost 5G uptake predicts report
Streaming video looks like it will the number one activity most adopters of 5G will be looking forward to experiencing, according to a recent report.
Interesting figures are emerging from IHS Markit’s Digital Orbit report which was conducted in May 2019. This US-centric survey interrogated 2,031 people about their attitudes to 5G and found that 74 percent of respondents named video streaming as the main motivation for upgrading to 5G in the home. This came ahead of other activities such as video calling, social media, mobile gaming, virtual reality and augmented reality.

Thus, as 5G is deployed and video streaming increases, IHS Markit predicts that 70 percent of all mobile network traffic in 2022 will be from video activity, compared to 47 percent in 2015.

Interestingly, the survey also showed that the current 4G service sufficiently caters for most contemporary types of streamed video consumption leading to a conclusion that 5G will have a significant impact in emerging areas of the video market such as 4K and 8K UHD video. It is here that the growing demand for 4K content is expected to drive the uptake of 5G in the mobile market where the bandwidth restrictions of 4G can be easily overcome.

The report states 5G will be particularly useful for sporting and live event streaming to mobile devices where lower latency and higher speed and bandwidth are critical but the respondents that made up the 74% interested in 5G indicated that it is home use that will be the main driver for their 5G uptake.

This provides an interesting insight into how consumers may want 5G to serve them.

Joshua Builta, senior principal analyst for IHS, commented, “The promise of faster video streaming through 5G is generating enormous enthusiasm among consumers.”

He continued, “Interest is particularly high for those younger than 50, with 81 percent of survey respondents in that age range citing video streaming as the top activity for 5G. Consumers are expressing strong interest in video streaming both on smartphones and for home internet services, which are equally supported by 5G.”

With an average US broadband speed of 35Mbps in 2018, 5G will surpass that with theoretical connection speeds of up to 1Gbps (though initial rollouts will be slower say the industry). As consumers look to take advantage of the latest streaming services, 5G could play an important role in providing enough bandwidth to enable families to view 4K content from numerous streaming sources concurrently on multiple devices. IHS Markit forecasts that global over-the-top (OTT) video subscriptions will pass the 1 billion mark in 2021, up from 620 million at the end of last year.

Of course, access to the 5G network will have to be built-in to a new generation of home devices but Huawei is already rumoured to be working on a 5G based TV.


Would 5G provide the bandwidth boost AVForums members need for their home video streaming plans? Have you already got 5G on your mobile plan? If so, let others know whether it makes a difference in accessing video on your phone.

Source: www.tvbeurope.com, www.streamingmedia.com, www.rapidtvnews.com
Image Source: HRL.com

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