1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Sony use Dolby Vision HDR on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray

But do current displays with HDR support Dolby Vision?

by Steve Withers Sep 14, 2015


  • Sony Pictures Home Entertainment and Dolby Laboratories have announced plans to use the Dolby Vision mastering process for the release of upcoming Ultra HD 4K titles.
    Dolby Vision allows content creators to deliver an enhanced visual experience with a wider colour gamut and high dynamic range (HDR). Dolby Vision is an end-to-end solution that has already been adopted by Warner Bros. and can be incorporated from content creation to distribution and playback . The mastering process, will provide increased brightness, a wider dynamic range and deeper colours to future Ultra HD 4K content produced by Sony Pictures and delivered via Ultra HD Blu-ray and digital distribution platforms.

    “We continue to be enthusiastic about the growing consumer appetite for next-generation 4K Ultra HD content. With Dolby Vision imaging technology, we can now master our movies with the highest-quality visual experience for distribution to consumers’ homes,” said Richard Berger, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Digital Strategy and Advanced Platforms, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (SPHE).

    “Dolby Vision shines a bright new light on Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s compelling new releases and distinguished catalogue,” said Curt Behlmer, Senior Vice President, Content Solutions and Industry Relations, Dolby Laboratories. “Consumers who purchase SPHE movies that have been mastered in Dolby Vision are able to feel the full visual drama of lifelike images unfold in the comfort of their living room, exciting their senses with an entirely new entertainment experience.”

    Sony Pictures plan to release a growing slate of Ultra HD 4K titles mastered in Dolby Vision of the coming months. Dolby Vision is one of a number of new mastering processes that support HDR, the others include technologies by Philips, the BBC, Technicolor and the open source HDR 10. The real question is which mastering process will the various studio adopt and can those displays that support HDR handle the different technologies?

    To comment on what you've read here, click the Discussion tab and post a reply.

    Share This Page