Sony to buy Bungie for 3.6 billion bucks

Anything you can do…

by Andy Bassett

Sony has announced it intends to purchase renowned US video game developer Bungie for a cool $3.6 billion.

In a blog post, Jim Ryan president of Sony Interactive Entertainment welcomed the legendary game studio into the Playstation fold where he immediately laid concerns about potential PlayStation exclusivity to rest by stating that, “... Bungie will remain an independent and multi-platform studio and publisher.”

Sony’s move comes just a few weeks after Microsoft stunned the gaming industry with its plans to acquire Activision Blizzard and while on the surface this might seem like a retaliatory move on Sony’s part, in fact this is the Japanese gaming giant’s sixth acquisition since 2021 and seems to be a continuation of plans by both console makers to equip themselves with all the developer tools they need to push ahead in the massively lucrative gaming market.

While the cash value of the Sony/Bungie deal is around just 5 percent of Microsoft’s $69 billion Activision Blizzard loot box extravaganza, the cumulative effect of Sony’s past, present (and future?) acquisitions could add up to a significant retort to the Xbox owner’s strategy to bolster its Xbox Game Studios.

Sony to buy Bungie for 3.6 billion bucks
Bungie game lineup

Ryan states that, “Bungie is a great innovator and has developed incredible proprietary tools that will help PlayStation Studios achieve new heights…” which seems to indicate that there are plans to roll out additional technologies and innovations to benefit PlayStation gamers going forward.

Even with that said though, Bungie CEO Pete Parsons has reiterated that the company will “...remain in charge of our destiny,” and, “... will continue to independently publish and creatively develop our games.” Thus, it seems that Bungie’s major multiplayer franchise Destiny 2 will remain a multiplatform property for the foreseeable future while its new, in-development IP will also be a multiplatform title.

Bungie of course came to prominence in 2000 when it was acquired by Microsoft and played a large role in the 2001 launch of the Xbox with the very first Halo game. However, the two companies parted ways in 2007 with the Halo IP remaining with Microsoft and now under the stewardship of Microsoft-owned 343 Industries.

Bungie went on to score a huge worldwide hit with multiplayer first person shooter Destiny 2.

Sony to buy Bungie for 3.6 billion bucks
Bungie's Destiny 2

Interestingly, just as the purchase of Activision Blizzard re-surfaced widely reported harassment claims against its CEO, so Bungie has had its own issue with its internal culture and operations, something Sony will no doubt be quick to ensure is corrected.

So with developers and publishers being snapped up by Microsoft and Sony at a seemingly increased rate, what does this mean for gamers going forward? Will the assurances that franchise/platform silos won’t be erected hold or will players have to choose a favourite franchise before they decide which console is right for them? Don’t gamers do this to some extent already? Whatever happens, it seems the era of eye-watering, game company acquisitions isn’t over just yet.

Source: Blog Post
Image Source: Sony

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