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Onkyo announce DTS:X AV Receivers

So DTS:X uses a 7.1.4 speaker configuration - that sounds familiar

by Steve Withers May 12, 2015


  • Onkyo have announced their first AV receivers to support both Dolby Atmos and DTS:X, along with a host of other features.
    The new TX-NR646 78.2-channel AV receiver will be released in May, it will be available in a choice of silver or black and will retail for a very reasonable £549. The TX-NR747 7.2-channel AV Receiver will be released in mid to late June, will also be available in silver or black and will cost £849. The NR646 can deliver 160W per a channel of power, whilst the NR747 outputs 175W per a channel and is THX Select 2 Plus certified to guarantee theatre-reference volume with minimal distortion. Both receivers are fitted with Dual 32-bit DSP Engines and a new 384 kHz/32-bit AK4458 DAC from Asahi-Kasei for transparent reproduction of music and soundtracks.

    Along with the next-generation audio decoding are eight 4K/60 Hz-ready HDMI 2.0a inputs and two multi-zone outputs, including dedicated HDCP 2.2-compliant terminals for 4K streaming and Ultra HD Blu-ray with Dolby Atmos or DTS:X audio. In addition High Dynamic Range (HDR) and 21:9 cinema-aspect are also supported; whilst both receivers are set up for wireless audio with Wi-Fi, AirPlay, and Bluetooth. Onkyo’s new Remote App 3 streams digital music stored on mobiles while accessing numerous Internet radio and on-demand music services.

    Naturally streaming via the Spotify app is also supported, while users can enjoy 192/24 FLAC and DSD 5.6 MHz Hi-Res Audio files via DLNA, or use the phono equaliser input to connect a turntable. Onkyo want the operation of both products to be as clear and simple as possible. So they have updated their AccuEQ room calibration feature to quickly and accurately equalise the speaker configuration for clear and balanced surround-sound on initial setup. Thee's also a Quick Setup function making everyday operation a breeze.
    DTS:X and Dolby Atmos use an object-based approach to sound mixing rather than specific channels, thus accurately matching the sound to their corresponding visual objects as they pass above and around the audience. There will be a firmware update coming later in the year to add DTS:X, which can scale to any home theatre configuration up to 7.1.4 channels with enhanced flexibility for height-channel placement, including in-ceiling speakers, front/rear height channels, and even Dolby Atmos-ready speaker systems. Dialogue in DTS:X can be mixed as a discrete sound object, so users can raise or lower it independently of other elements in DTS:X soundtracks, resulting in dramatically improved audibility than is currently possible.

    In addition, DTS:X incorporates Neural:X, the latest spatial re-mapping technology from DTS, which provides a fully immersive output for all types of source content. This includes DTS bitstreams, non-encoded (PCM) data and Neural-encoded radio broadcasts of major global sporting events, leading to a more thrilling sense of atmosphere regardless of the original source format. “We’re confident that DTS:X represents the most convenient and effective way for movie lovers to experience immersive multi-dimensional sound,” said DTS EVP and chief marketing officer Kevin Doohan.

    We're certainly glad that you can decode both Dolby Atmos and DTS:X using the same 7.1.4 speaker configuration. That meaning whatever formats is used, you can enjoy immersive object-based sound with only one speaker layout, which has to be good news for everyone.

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