MP3 Pronounced Dead

AAC and MPEG-H now better equipped

by Mark Hodgkinson May 15, 2017 at 3:21 PM


  • The MP3 format which is so synonymously associated with digital music has been pronounced dead by its creators.
    The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits, which is part of the German research organisation responsible for funding it’s development has ceased its licensing program for certain MP3-related patents after almost two decades.

    The institute said that although the format is still popular with consumers, it has been outstripped by, "more efficient audio codecs" with more advanced features and better compression efficiency.

    The news doesn’t mean that you wont still be able to play your MP3 collection, of course, but without industry support it is inevitable it will be used, in a commercial sense, less and less. MP3 is without patent in Europe and the States, however, so it’s not going to completely disappear, in the foreseeable future.

    "Most state-of-the-art media services such as streaming or TV and radio broadcasting use modern ISO-MPEG codecs such as the AAC (Advanced Audio Coding) family or in the future MPEG-H," said Fraunhofer IIS in a press release.

    "Those can deliver more features and a higher audio quality at much lower bitrates compared to mp3."

    The Fraunhofer Institute, incidentally, was also partly responsible for the creation of AAC which is the codec of choice, on iTunes and YouTube, among others.



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