1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

A Guide to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray

Everything you wanted to know about 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray

by Steve Withers Feb 25, 2016 - Updated: Aug 18, 2016


  • There are an increasing number of ways to enjoy Ultra HD 4K content these days but if you want the best possible experience then you should really be looking at physical delivery via Blu-ray disc.
    Blu-ray has been providing a superior high definition picture and sound since 2006 and, in the spring of 2016, the 4K Ultra HD version will finally arrive, bringing with it the best-specified UHD experience possible. Whilst there is a certain appeal to the cost-effective ease and convenience of 4K streaming, it does rather depend on the speed of your broadband connection. And, even if your broadband connection is fast enough, you can sometimes find that speeds drop or you lose your connection entirely - which could be very annoying if you're about sit down and watch a film. Ultra HD Blu-ray provides a perfect 4K image that doesn't require a fast broadband connection and is a repeatable experience that's identical every time you put the disc in your player. You can also watch the disc whenever you want, which means you're not dependant on a third-party to provide access.

    In this guide we'll take you through the specifications for 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, the disc players that will soon be available and all the discs that have been announced to date.

    4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Specifications

    Ultra HD Blu-ray is a 4K extension of the existing format that has been delivering the best-possible high definition picture and sound for the last decade. This new ultra high definition version was developed by the BDA (Blu-ray Disc Association), which is comprised of all the major studios and consumer electronics companies, and the specifications were finalised in May of 2015.

    The new format will deliver a 3840 x 2160 pixel image and will allow for a wider colour gamut of up to Rec.2020 and a higher bit rate of up to 100Mbps. It also specifies a 10-bit video depth, HEVC encoding, HDCP 2.2 copy protection, HDMI 2.0a and support for both high dynamic range (SMPTE 2084) and higher frame rates. Ultra HD Blu-ray will also support the new object-based audio formats which include Dolby Atmos, DTS:X and Auro-3D. Additionally, with an optional digital bridge feature, the specifications allow content purchases to be viewed by consumers across a range of in-home and mobile devices.

    The Ultra HD Blu-ray discs themselves will not use regional coding, although if you buy any Ultra HD Blu-rays from the US don't forget that the included Full HD Blu-ray might have regional coding, depending on the studio. The UHD Blu-rays themselves have a capacity of 66GB and 100GB of data on dual and triple layer discs respectively. The specification also mandates that all new Ultra HD Blu-ray players will be capable of playing back existing Full HD Blu-rays, which means that you can still enjoy your current library of discs. There is no support for 3D within the 4K Ultra HD specifications, primarily because 3D films aren't even finished in 4K for the cinema. However there is no reason why an Ultra HD Blu-ray player couldn't playback Full HD 3D Blu-rays, just like existing Blu-ray players.

    High dynamic range is one of the big selling points of Ultra HD content (including both 4K Blu-ray and video streaming) and in the case of UHD Blu-ray, the BDA has gone to great lengths to ensure that consumers get the best possible experience. There is already a large established user base of 4K TVs, not all of which support HDR. It is important to the studios is that at no point does a consumer put an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc with HDR in their player and get a washed out picture due to incompatibility with their non-HDR 4K TV. What will happen is that the player will map the content on the disc to the native colour gamut and dynamic range capabilities of the display, so that theoretically you are getting the best possible picture based on your 4K TV's capabilities. If for some reason this proves impossible, then the consumer will be asked to play the other disc included, which will be a standard Blu-ray.

    4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Players

    To date, three Ultra HD Blu-ray players have been announced but the Philips model is exclusive to the US. However the other two players will be released in the UK in early spring and include the Panasonic DMP-UB900 and the Samsung UBD-K8500. Sony have announced that they will be releasing a UHD Blu-ray player within the next year and we have heard that Oppo are also working on a player. LG have said that they are waiting to see how the new format is received before committing to a player of their own. Both the Samsung and Panasonic players support the specifications created by the BDA and they support Full HD 3D Blu-ray playback. They also include two HDMI outputs, one for video and one for audio; which will be useful if your AV receiver or soundbar doesn't support HDMI 2.0a and HDCP 2.2. The players also support HDR, more specifically HDR10, but they do not support Dolby Vision (another version of HDR) because the necessary chipset won't be available until the summer.


    Panasonic DMP-UB900 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Player

    Panasonic released their first Ultra HD Blu-ray player in April at a price of £599 and the emphasis is very much on the higher-end with a better level of build quality, THX certification, a new 4K High-Precision Chroma Processor and an improved audio performance. The player supports 4K resolution (3,840 x 2,160 pixels) and HDR10, along with support for up to 12-bit video, higher frame rates of up to 60p and a brightness range of 1,000 to 10,000 nits; as well as the BT.2020 wide color gamut to further enhance colour reproduction. The UB900 incorporates a newly developed 4K-ready engine, called the 4K High-Precision Chroma Processor, which uses proprietary technology developed by Panasonic's Hollywood Laboratory to interpolate the decoded 4K (4:2:0) signals of Ultra HD Blu-ray content to 4K (4:4:4). The UB900 includes a wide range of digital and analogue terminals, including a twin HDMI arrangement that separates audio and video signals to suppress unwanted noise and achieve high-quality audio reproduction.

    In addition, it supports analogue 7.1-channel audio for a direct connection to a home theatre system for lifelike surround sound. Each terminal is gold-plated to resist oxidization and maintain high signal conductivity. The UB900 also uses high-quality audio parts including large-capacity electrolytic capacitors to ensure a stable power supply and provide the sound with more power, while a Mica capacitor reduces internal digital noise from the power line. The digital circuitry features a LAN Common Mode Filter that decreases noise from external devices during network playback, and the audio circuitry supports a high-resolution 192-kHz/32-bit DAC. The UB900 is designed for high-resolution audio reproduction and in addition to the conventional WAV/FLAC/MP3/AAC/WMA formats, it also supports DSD (5.6 MHz/2.8 MHz) and ALAC music files. The UB900 also supports 4K VOD (Video on Demand) services, to give users a greater choice of 4K content. The DMP-UB900 was certified Ultra HD Premium at launch by the UHD Alliance and you can read the full review here.


    Samsung UBD-K8500 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Player

    Samsung's UBD-K8500 was the world's first Ultra HD Blu-ray player, arriving in the US in March and the UK in April at a price of £429 with a copy of The Martian included. The K8500 uses a slightly curved front panel and includes twin HDMI outputs, one for video and one for audio. This is important because many people will have AV receivers that don't support HDMI 2.0a or HDCP2.2. Aside from that, the player has a few basic controls and a disc tray. Around the back, along with the HDMI outputs, you'll find a digital optical output and an Ethernet port; although the K8500 also has built-in WiFi. As an Ultra HD Blu-ray player the K8500 supports 10-bit video, Rec.2020 and high dynamic range, specifically HDR10 although it doesn't support Dolby Vision. The UBD-K8500 has recently been certified Ultra HD Premium by the UHD Alliance and you can read the full review here.

    4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Discs

    So far 20th Century Fox, Sony Pictures, Warner Bros, Lionsgate, Universal and Paramount have announced support for Ultra HD Blu-ray. That leaves Disney as the only major studio that isn't currently releasing Ultra HD Blu-rays. In terms of the discs themselves, all the studios have gone for an open-source approach with HDR10 and a wider colour gamut, rather than Dolby Vision which offers an HDR10 base but also a degree of future-proofing with 12-bit video depth, wider colour gamuts and a higher peak brightness. In terms of the audio support, Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Lionsgate have adopted Dolby Atmos on some or, in the case of Sony, all of their UHD Blu-ray discs. Whilst others have used a combination of Dolby Atmos and DTS:X soundtracks, with DTS:X often being used for films that didn't have an Atmos mix at the cinema. All of the UHD discs announced so far include both the Ultra HD Blu-ray and a regular Full HD Blu-ray, along with a digital HD copy.

    There is a significant reality that isn't generally being mentioned by the studios when it comes to Ultra HD Blu-ray and that is the fact that the majority of cinema releases are either shot or finished at a resolution of 2K (which is very similar to Full HD). There are more films being shot at a resolution of 4K (or higher) and then finished using a 4K digital intermediate but most of the UHD Blu-rays announced to date are not actually native 4K and were in fact finished at a resolution of 2K. Of course there are still the added benefits of 10-bit video, a higher bit rate, a wider colour gamut and HDR, all of which will combine to produce an image that is superior to anything we've seen before. However it is worth remembering that for the foreseeable future, many of UHD Blu-rays we buy won't actually have a native resolution of 4K. In the following list of currently available Ultra HD Blu-rays we will identify which discs are genuinely 4K and which ones use a 2K digital intermediate.


    Allegiant (Lionsgate)

    Allegiant was shot digitally on Arri Alexa XT and 65 cameras at a resolution of 3.4K and 6.5K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Allegiant on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Amazing Spider-man 2 (Sony Pictures)

    The Amazing Spider-man 2 was shot on 35mm film and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy The Amazing Spider-man 2 on UHD Blu-ray here


    Angles & Demons (Sony Pictures)

    Angles & Demons was shot on 35mm film and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.


    The Angry Birds Movie (Sony Pictures)

    The Angry Birds Movie is computer generated animation and was rendered at a resolution of 2K. Sony Pictures have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and also remixed the soundtrack in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy The Angry Birds Movie on UHD Blu-ray here


    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice
    (Warner Bros.)

    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was shot using a variety of digital and film formats, including IMAX, and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice on UHD Blu-ray here


    Central Intelligence (Warner Bros.)

    Central Intelligence was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 2.8K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warners have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Central Intelligence on UHD Blu-ray here


    Chappie (Sony Pictures)

    Chappie was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this UHD Blu-ray will be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Sony Pictures have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and they have remixed the soundtrack in Dolby Atmos for the UHD Blu-ray release.

    You can buy Chappie on UHD Blu-ray here


    Concussion (Sony Pictures)

    Concussion was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate. However since the source material was shot at a higher resolution and there are no major effects sequences, it's possible that a new 4K digital intermediate was created. The disc also includes HDR 10, a wider colour gamut and a Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy Concussion on UHD Blu-ray here


    Creed (Warner Bros.)

    Creed was shot digitally using Arri Alexa XT cameras at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warners have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Creed on UHD Blu-ray here


    Criminal (Lionsgate)

    Criminal was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 2.8K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Criminal on UHD Blu-ray here


    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Sony Pictures)

    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was shot on film using Super 35 and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.


    The Da Vinci Code (Sony Pictures)

    The Da Vinci Code was shot on 35mm film and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack was remixed in Dolby Atmos.


    Deadpool (20th Century Fox)

    Deadpool was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. 20th Century Fox may also have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Deadpool on UHD Blu-ray here


    Divergent (Lionsgate)

    Divergent was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa M camera at a resolution of 2.8K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in DTS:X.

    You can buy Divergent on UHD Blu-ray here


    Eddie the Eagle (20th Century Fox)

    Eddie the Eagle was shot digitally using the Red Epic Dragon and 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc retains the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy Eddie the Eagle on UHD Blu-ray here


    Ender's Game (Lionsgate)

    Ender's Game was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Ender's Game on UHD Blu-ray here


    Everest (Universal Pictures)

    Everest was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus and Red Epic Dragon cameras at a resolution of 3.4K and 6K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Everest on UHD Blu-ray here


    Exodus: Gods and Kings (20th Century Fox)

    Exodus: Gods and Kings was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; although despite being mixed in Dolby Atmos for its theatrical release the soundtrack is only a 7.1-channel DTS-HD Master Audio mix.

    You can buy Exodus: Gods and Kings on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Expendables III (Lionsgate)

    The Expendables III was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this disc will be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Lionsgate have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy The Expendables III on UHD Blu-ray here


    Fantastic Four (20th Century Fox)

    Fantastic Four was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of less than 4K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 but, although the film was mixed in Dolby Atmos for its theatrical release, the UHD Blu-ray only has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Fantastic Four on UHD Blu-ray here


    The 5th Wave (Sony Pictures)

    The 5th Wave was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution unless Sony have remastered the film at 4K. They have certainly transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and they have remixed the soundtrack in Dolby Atmos for the UHD Blu-ray release, so it's possible.

    You can buy The 5th Wave on UHD Blu-ray here


    Ghostbusters (Sony Pictures)

    Ghostbusters was shot on 35mm film and was restored at 4K, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has also been remixed into Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Ghostbusters on UHD Blu-ray here


    Ghostbusters II (Sony Pictures)

    Ghostbusters II was shot on 35mm film and was restored at 4K, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has also been remixed into Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Ghostbusters II on UHD Blu-ray here


    Gods of Egypt (Lionsgate)

    Gods of Egypt was shot digitally using the Red Epic Dragon camera at a resolution of 6K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. Lionsgate have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and they have also remixed the soundtrack in DTS:X.

    You can buy Gods of Egypt on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Great Gatsby (Warner Bros.)

    The Great Gatsby was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. Warner Bros. have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10.


    Hancock (Sony Pictures)

    Hancock was shot on film using the Super 35 process and finished using a 4K digital intermediate, so the UHD Blu-ray should be able to take full advantage of the additional resolution. However given that the film was made back in 2008, it's possible that the effects were only finished at 2K. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Hancock on UHD Blu-ray here


    Hitman: Agent 47 (20th Century Fox)

    Hitman: Agent 47 was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of less than 4K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Hitman: Agent 47 on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Huntsman: Winter's War (Universal Pictures)

    The Huntsman: Winter's War was shot digitally on Arri Alexa XT and 65 cameras at a resolution of 3.4K and 6.5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. However Universal Pictures have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack was remixed in DTS:X.

    You can buy The Huntsman: Winter's War on UHD Blu-ray here


    Independence Day (20th Century Fox)

    Independence Day was shot on film using Super 35 and was restored at 4K, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has also been remixed into DTS:X.

    You can buy Independence Day on UHD Blu-ray here


    Insurgent (Lionsgate)

    Insurgent was shot digitally on Arri Alexa XT and Red Scarlet cameras at a resolution of 3.4K and 4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc uses the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy Insurgent on UHD Blu-ray here


    In the Heart of the Sea (Warner Bros.)

    In the Heart of the Sea was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warner Bros have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc uses the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy In the Heart of the Sea on UHD Blu-ray here


    Journey into Space (Shout! Factory)

    Journey into Space is an IMAX feature that was shot on a number of large format film stock and transferred to Ultra HD Blu-ray at a resolution of 4K. The disc includes both the 4K SDR and 4K HDR 10 versions, as well as a wider colour gamut on the HDR 10 version and a Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy Journey into Space on UHD Blu-ray here


    Joy (20th Century Fox)

    Joy was shot on film using the Super35 process and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution unless 20th Century Fox remaster the film at 4K. However Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix.

    You can buy Joy on UHD Blu-ray here


    Jupiter Ascending (Warner Bros.)

    Jupiter Ascending was shot digitally on Arri Alexa Plus and XT and Red Scarlet cameras at a resolution of 2.8K and 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. However Warner Bros. have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc uses the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos soundtrack.


    Kingsman: The Secret Service (20th Century Fox)

    Kingsman: The Secret Service was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of less than 4K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 but, although the film was mixed in Dolby Atmos for its theatrical release, the UHD Blu-ray only has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Kingsman: The Secret Service on UHD Blu-ray here


    Labyrinth (Sony Pictures)

    Labyrinth was shot on 35mm film and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Labyrinth on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Last Witch Hunter (Lionsgate)

    The Last Witch Hunter was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this disc will be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. Lionsgate have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10. The film was released theatrically with an Auro 11.1 soundtrack and the UHD Blu-ray has a DTS:X soundtrack.

    You can buy The Last Witch Hunter on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Lego Movie (Warner Bros.)

    The Lego Movie combines computer generated animation with live action sequences that were shot using the Arri Alexa camera at a resolution of 2.8K and was finished using a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warner Bros. have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and the UHD Blu-ray has a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy The Lego Movie on UHD Blu-ray here


    Life of Pi (20th Century Fox)

    Life of Pi was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy Life of Pi on UHD Blu-ray here


    Lone Survivor (Universal Pictures)

    Lone Survivor was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Universal have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack was remixed in DTS:X.

    You can buy Lone Survivor on UHD Blu-ray here


    Lucy (Universal Pictures)

    Lucy was shot digitally on Arri Alexa XT Plus, Red Epic and Sony CineAlta F65 cameras at a resolution of 2.8K, 4K and 5K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Lucy on UHD Blu-ray here


    Mad Max: Fury Road (Warner Bros.)

    Mad Max: Fury Road was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warner Bros have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the UHD Blu-ray has a Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy Mad Max: Fury Road on UHD Blu-ray here


    Man of Steel (Warner Bros.)

    Man of Steel was shot on 35mm film but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warner Bros have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Man of Steel on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Martian – Extended Edition (20th Century Fox)

    The Martian was shot digitally using the Red Epic camera at a resolution of 6K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10, whilst the Extended Edition includes the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos mix.

    You can buy The Martian – Extended Edition on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Maze Runner (20th Century Fox)

    The Maze Runner was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and, although the film was mixed in both Dolby Atmos and Auro 11.1 for its theatrical release, the disc uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy The Maze Runner on UHD Blu-ray here


    Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials (20th Century Fox)

    Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and, although the film was mixed in both Dolby Atmos and Auro 11.1 for its theatrical release, the disc uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials on UHD Blu-ray here


    Now You See Me (Lionsgate)

    Now You See Me was shot on 35mm film but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray won't be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and they have also remixed the soundtrack in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Now You See Me on UHD Blu-ray here


    Now You See Me 2 (Lionsgate)

    Now You See Me 2 was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Lionsgate have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos mix.

    You can buy Now You See Me 2 on UHD Blu-ray here


    Oblivion
    (Universal Pictures)

    Oblivion was shot digitally on Red Epic and Sony CineAlta F65 cameras at a resolution of 4K and 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However the transfer does use a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Oblivion on UHD Blu-ray here


    Pacific Rim (Warner Bros.)

    Pacific Rim was shot digitally on Red Epic cameras at a resolution of 5K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However the transfer does use a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.


    Pan (Warner Bros.)

    Pan was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of 3.4K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Warner Bros have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Pan on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Peanuts Movie (20th Century Fox)

    The Peanuts Movie is computer generated animation and was rendered at a resolution of 2K. 20th Century Fox have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and also used the theatrical Dolby Atmos soundtrack.

    You can buy The Peanuts Movie on UHD Blu-ray here


    Pineapple Express (Sony Pictures)

    Pineapple Express was shot on film using the Super 35 process and finished using a 2K digital intermediate, so the UHD Blu-ray won't be able to take full advantage of the additional resolution. Although since the source material was shot on film and there are no major effects sequences, it's possible that a new 4K digital intermediate was created. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Pineapple Express on UHD Blu-ray here


    Point Break (Warner Bros.)

    Point Break was shot digitally using a combination of the Arri Alexa XT Plus and Red Epic Dragon cameras at a resolution of 2.8K and 6K, with the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However Warners have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy Point Break on UHD Blu-ray here


    Pride & Prejudice & Zombies (Sony Pictures)

    Pride & Prejudice & Zombies was transferred using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Pride & Prejudice & Zombies on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Revenant (20th Century Fox)

    The Revenant was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa 65 camera at a resolution of 6.5K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this disc will be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. 20th Century Fox have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10, although whilst the film itself was mixed in Dolby Atmos for its theatrical release, the disc uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy The Revenant on UHD Blu-ray here


    Risen (Sony Pictures)

    Risen was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa camera and transferred using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos

    You can buy Risen on UHD Blu-ray here


    Salt (Sony Pictures)

    Salt was shot on film using the Super 35 process and finished using a 4K digital intermediate, so the UHD Blu-ray should be able to take full advantage of the additional resolution. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy Salt on UHD Blu-ray here


    San Andreas (Warner Bros.)

    San Andreas was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Warner Bros have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy San Andreas on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Shallows (Sony Pictures)

    The Shallows was shot digitally on Arri Alexa XT and Red Epic Dragon cameras at a resolution of 3.4K and 4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. However Sony Pictures have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack has been remixed in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy The Shallows on UHD Blu-ray here


    Sicario (Lionsgate)

    Sicario was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this disc will be able to take full advantage of the 4K resolution. Lionsgate have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10. The film was released theatrically with an Auro 11.1 soundtrack and the disc includes a Dolby Atmos soundtrack

    You can buy Sicario on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Smurfs 2 (Sony Pictures)

    The Smurfs 2 was shot digitally using the Sony CineAlta F65 camera at a resolution of 4K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this UHD Blu-ray will be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Sony Pictures have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 and they have remixed the soundtrack in Dolby Atmos.

    You can buy The Smurfs 2 on UHD Blu-ray here


    Snow White and the Huntsman (Universal Pictures)

    Snow White and the Huntsman was shot on 35mm film but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray won't be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. However the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the disc uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy Snow White and the Huntsman on UHD Blu-ray here


    Star Trek
    (Paramount Pictures)

    Star Trek was shot on 35mm film but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, which means that the UHD Blu-ray won't be able to take full advantage of the higher resolution of the format. In addition the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a new Dolby Atmos mix.

    You can buy Star Trek on UHD Blu-ray here


    Star Trek Into Darkness (Paramount Pictures)

    Star Trek Into Darkness was shot on 35mm film, with some sequences shot using large format IMAX cameras and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate for the 35mm sequences and a 4K DI for the IMAX footage, which means that the UHD Blu-ray will be able to take advantage of the higher resolution of the format in the IMAX scenes. In addition the transfer uses a multiple aspect ratio with the 35mm footage at 2.40:1 and the IMAX footage at 1.78:1. The disc also uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Star Trek Into Darkness on UHD Blu-ray here


    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows (Paramount Pictures)

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Paramount have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release.

    You can buy Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows on UHD Blu-ray here


    The Texas Chain Saw Massacre ()

    The Texas Chain Saw Massacre was originally shot on 16mm film stock and the Ultra HD Blu-ray has been restored at a resolution of 4K. The disc also includes a Dolby Atmos and an Auro-3D soundtrack.

    You can buy The Texas Chain Saw Massacre on UHD Blu-ray here


    Warcraft (Universal Pictures)

    Warcraft was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT Plus camera at a resolution of 3.4K but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. Paramount have transferred the film for a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack is in Dolby Atmos, which the film was mixed in for its original theatrical release..

    You can buy Warcraft on UHD Blu-ray here


    Watchmen (Warner Bros.)

    Watchmen was shot on film using Super 35 but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix.

    You can buy Watchmen on UHD Blu-ray here

    Wild (20th Century Fox)

    Wild was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix.

    You can buy Wild on UHD Blu-ray here


    X-Men: Days of Future Past (20th Century Fox)

    X-Men: Days of Future Past was shot digitally using the Arri Alexa XT camera at a resolution of 2.8K and the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However 20th Century Fox have transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10 but, although the film was mixed in Dolby Atmos for its theatrical release, the UHD Blu-ray only has a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 soundtrack.

    You can buy X-Men: Days of Future Past on UHD Blu-ray here


    X-Men Apocalypse (20th Century Fox)

    X-Men: Apocalypse was shot digitally using the Red Epic Dragon camera at a resolution of 6K and the filmmakers used a 4K digital intermediate, so this UHD Blu-ray will be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. 20th Century Fox have also transferred the film using a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses the film's theatrical Dolby Atmos mix.

    You can buy X-Men: Apocalypse on UHD Blu-ray here


    X-Men: First Class (20th Century Fox)

    X-Men: First Class was shot on film using Super 35 but the filmmakers used a 2K digital intermediate, so this disc won't be genuinely 4K in terms of its resolution. However the transfer uses a wider colour gamut and HDR10; whilst the soundtrack uses a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix..

    You can buy X-Men: First Class on UHD Blu-ray here

    To comment on what you've read here, click the Discussion tab and post a reply.

    Share This Page