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Wood Screen Technology !

Discussion in 'Projector Screens' started by Tempest, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Bit of a silly one perhaps but.................

    I've seen photo's of people's projected images who own screens costing £100's of pounds.

    I've seen photo's taken when projecting onto white walls, Ikea Blinds, hell even projecting onto BLACK bits of fabric....!

    And know what. They all look bloody good images.

    Now I'm sure there is a lot of difference when you are there in person but it's amazing just how good these things are when people are using such a variety of surfaces to shine their picture onto...

    Which leads me onto what I'm thinking of doing:

    I understand from reading previous threads that the paint "Duluxe Ice Storm" is the most recommended colour paint to use for a LCD projector. Being off white meaning the blacks are enhanced.

    Before going any further. Would you still feel this is correct?

    To carry on.

    I was thinking about buying a sheet of wood (MDF or PLY or ChipBoard) mounting it onto the wall and painting it with this colour to use as a cheap screen.

    I'd thought if I make it about 2 to 3 inches larger all the way round then I can use this border to fit the screws thru the wood and into the wall, then painting this boarder matt black which will hide the screws and give a nice dark surround to the image.

    A few questions regarding material:

    If I paint plain MDF it goes a bit furry as the surface get's wet with the paint. I wonder if this will be an issue?
    Or I know you can get Chipboard with a white melamine covering, which I could paint and would give a smoother surface. Perhaps this would be better ?

    If you've not got bored reading this by now. I have the all important final question.

    Just what picture can I expect from something like this ?
    Is it going to be very poor to the point that I'll just ripp the thing off the wall and wished I'd paid out a few £100 for a proper screen, or for LCD projection is it really going to be very very close to the quality of image you'd get from a matt screen anyway ?

    Anyone gone from a Duluxe Ice Storm painted surface to a real screen and been god smacked by the immense difference, or rather dissapointed that it didn't really make THAT much of an improvment....

    I know we're not after reflection with a LCD.
  2. Kramer

    Kramer Guest

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    If you can accommodate a "fixed" screen, I'd say go for it ;)

    You'll find that most with "proper" screens need/needed a retractable screen due to their viewing environment.......living room etc..

    Personally I found a 50/50 mix of Icestorm 5/6 too "dull" sapping the life out of the picture. Perhaps at a smaller size or with a higher lumen PJ it would have provided better results. As they say, YMMV.

    There's a new UK/Irish distributor for Goo Systems - hoping to have a sample in the coming weeks for review purposes.

    Links to "homemade" screen(s) in the FAQ IIRC.



    :smoke:
  3. cyberheater

    cyberheater Member

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    Tempest: go for the "Chipboard with a white melamine covering" and then paint with Icestorm #5. The theory is that no paint is completely opaque. The low energy light (the darks in your scene) will hit the grey and get obsorbed. The high energy stuff (the bright stuff in you scenes) will partially pass thru the grey and get reflected of the bright white surface.
    I know it sounds a bit mad but you kind of end up with the best of both worlds. Great blacks and good whites.

    Layered paint technologys are what the goo system is based on. It has a specific base coat / top coat for the same reason.

    Personally, my screen is 3 coats of brilliant white emulsion with 2 thin coats of Dulux Icestorm 5 and the image is cracking. Much more depth then my Ikea blackout blind and much less susceptible to low ambient light conditions.
  4. clancol

    clancol Member

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    you could always go down the route i did.
    Build your screen as you were intending but instead of painting it buy some proper screen material from DRH and attach that to your screen then use fabric or black paint for the border.
    The fabric is matt white and is about £40-£50 for a width of 2 meters( its the same white fabric used on there proper screens)
  5. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Hmmm, interesting answers. Many thanks..........

    I phoned up a local wood merchant today and it's gonna cost me £35 for a 8x4ft sheet of 15mm thick chipboard with a white dead flat face (which I could paint with a coat of icestorm)

    By the time I've bought the wood, and paint and some screws to hold the sucker to the wall I'm looking at £50 ish total for the job.

    The other idea of REAL screen fabric is interesting. (never thought of that one)

    I could get some cheaper MDF and stretch that over it....

    Hmmmmmmmmm, Now a question here......

    It was my understanding that people were using this icestorm paint as being off white it gave better blacks.
    But screen material is white isn't it ?

    I'm a bit puzzled about this really..... But like the idea of using the proper stuff unless it's going to spoil the blacks.
  6. Kramer

    Kramer Guest

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    Using a "grey" screen will certailny improve black level but also have a (detrimental) inevitable effect on white level.

    Biggest advantage of a homemade fixed screen is it offers one the opportunity to see what works best/you prefer.

    Doesn't cost too much to change it etc....
  7. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Yeah, well I did wonder about the white level, then saw a posting by someone on here showing screenshots of their projector, using a BLACK cloth as a screen........ eh ???? And seemed excellent. Bit puzzled about that one !

    The best was I guess is to have a projector up and running, say on a plain wall, then you can test other things as screens even if they are not full size, you could see how they affect the image on even a small area.

    I guess though as has been said above. proper screen fabric would be best, though if it's not reflective I don't really understand what's so special about a white (ish) surface that makes it cost a few £100.

    If it was full of highly reflective glass beads then I could equate some reason for the cost, but a sheet of white plastic/material with a fine grain does not seem that special.
  8. fufna

    fufna Guest

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    Have a look at plasterboard prices....

    an 8 x 4 sheet of board is less than £5.

    paint this your chosen colour (with borders etc) and off you go!
  9. Aqualung

    Aqualung Member

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    Just finished work on our screen last weekend.

    It is hinged to close away against a wall and opens out to cover the bay window and the big telly. Because we have no permanent fixing it has to be light. Our answer was a sheet of 1" foam (yes it is fire retardent). The viewing side has been painted several times with white emulsion. The non viewing side will be 'murialised' by the wife and kids.

    The screen is 100" x 65".

    We are now thinking about how we fix the projector. It cannot be a permanent fixture and must be able to be 'folded' away.
  10. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Hmmm, that's another great idea. I was thinking what else could you buy that was flat and rigid enough to be fixed to the wall....

    That's certainly at the cheaper end of the screen market :)

    Wonder if you could screw it to a wall without it cracking though ?
  11. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Another good idea.
    Actually thinking about it, on the industrial site when I work there is a company that sells large slabs of foam in various colours.

    Including white and in 8x4 sheets.... it's closed cell (water won't go thru it) But don't think that's an issue for a screen !!!!

    I think it has a very slight sheen to the surface of the foam....
    Hmmmm, think I may try a chunk of it (found a bit a few years ago after a storm and a lot of their stock flew all ovef the estate!!)

    Certainly light enough to handle, easy enough to fix to the wall. and would take paint if needed.

    Was your foam not white in the first place ?
  12. fufna

    fufna Guest

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    How do you think plasterboard is usually fixed to the wall;)

    You could of course avoid screwing through it at all by fixing it with plasterboard adhesive.
  13. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Ummmm, forgive my memory but what projector do you have & what do you mean by 2 THIN coats of icestorm 5 ?

    Are you thining with water as 2 coats or icestorm is surely going to be a solid colour?
  14. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    As mentioned in another thread.
    I purchased some white painted ? hardboard just for a test.

    Thought I'd just see what it's like, plain, and with a couple of icestorms on it.

    Cost £2.60 so why not :)
  15. Aqualung

    Aqualung Member

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    The foam is blue because that the cheapest he had without ordering some. The first two coats of emulsion are soaked up like a sponge. After that it paints like any other surface. I do not know how it would react to anything other than water based/washable paint.

    Using it now and there is no light leakage to the outside at all and we have been watching our new projector on it all day because it doubles as a blsckout
  16. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    The most interesting thing I've read about screen material (and I don't know if it's a load of old twaddle was talk about the screen sort of spreading the light being shone onto it slightly. I guess you could almost say softening the edges of the pixels by making the edges glow/stretch somewhat. effectivly closing the screen door by some margin.

    Dunno if it was some fantasy talk though.
  17. Kramer

    Kramer Guest

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    "Old twaddle" - yep, I think so :)

    Ways to reduce/eliminate screendoor:

    1. Use a DLP PJ
    2. Use a higher resolution PJ with a better fill factor
    3. Defocus
    4. Panasonic's "smooth/softscreen" technology *



    * see point 3 :D
  18. Tempest

    Tempest Active Member

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    Just held my £2.60 piece of painted hardboard up to the light today.....

    You know, this has a very smooth surface, and has quite a sheen to it, I'd say this must have quite a bit of gain on it.

    Not anywhere near trying yet but wondering if anyone has assessed the gain level of this product ?

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