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What does the 'noise reduction' setting do on your tv?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by tombos8, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. tombos8

    tombos8 Member

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    Have the option under picture settings on my tv of 'noise reduction' with a choice of 'minimum, medium or maximum'. Does anyone have any idea what this setting does? Sounds like a sound thing to me!
  2. YellowSphere

    YellowSphere Active Member

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    It's trying to reduce picture noise (film grain, compression artefacts, pixellation etc.) but basically, they're just fancy blurring algorithms that reduce detail and make motion blur more apparent.
  3. Alan CD

    Alan CD Well-Known Member

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    YellowSphere is right and it's best to leave digital NR off, clearer picture with it off. :)
  4. djm1972

    djm1972 Member

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    I have MPEG NR "Low" on my Sony 32W40000 - I find that it noticeably cleans up some SD broadcasts - in particular the scrolling strap-lines on news channels - it removes the blocky artefacts you get around the characters as they move quickly across the screen...
  5. Nielo TM

    Nielo TM Member

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    Actually not always



    Not all noise reduction algorithms are the same. Some are very good at removing noise without impacting the over-all image quality.


    However, the ones found in TVs are quite average
  6. Alan CD

    Alan CD Well-Known Member

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    I have yet to come across a NR system that does not reduce the quality of a picture, no matter how good it is.

    There is always a heavy trade-off because NR algorithms cannot distinguish in every instance what is noise and what is part of the picture structure. Errors will always occur.

    One day they might get NR to remove noise only. IMO, until that day, NR is best switched off.
  7. Mumid

    Mumid Member

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    I can never reallly see a difference with it on or off tbh, so I leave it off for that reason.
  8. WillieCocker

    WillieCocker New Member

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    I agree , i've yet to see a display that NR doesn't create unecessary blur.
    It is needed on certain broadcasts as they do look awful , but it certainly doesn't fall under the category of picture enhancements :D
  9. Nielo TM

    Nielo TM Member

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    I didn't say the results will be perfect and free of errors. But as long as it can fool the human eye, it really doesn't matter.

    BTW, some NR methods are known to use combinations of filters to reduce the image overall image artifacts (e.g. NR+Deblock+Edge Enhancement). But like I've said before, the once found in most HDTVs are poor to average because it's hard to differentiate the errors from the image like you've said.



    PS: Here's an example NR+Deblock. As you can see, the post image is somewhat softer, but over-all image is cleaner. Edge enhancement can be used compensate for the loss in definition.

    Source

    [​IMG]



    Filtered:

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009

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