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Wall mounting plasmas in new houses

Discussion in 'TV & Projector Brackets & Mounts' started by Merritt, Feb 5, 2003.

  1. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    Guys - I have just been to Travis Perkins and spoken to a couple of guys there... They have sold me some special thermalite plugs that look like elongated propellors (like the type you may find on a boat but a longer and thinner... They are 50mm long, and you have to drill a 10mm hole in the wall and hammer them in. Diameter wise they are about 20mm across but apparently as you hammer them in, the 'fins' cut into the thermalite and hold tight?

    I have got 8 of them and 8 bolts that are 80mm long... Obviously I need to put some spacers inbetween the plug and the wall mount but has anyone else seen these?
  2. mikeq

    mikeq Guest

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    Yep, that is why brick ties usually have a twist in them or some kind of circular barrier thing. The moisture travels from the outside wall to the inside wall (condensation/heat etc)

    I knew my Civil Engineering would come in handy one day:lesson:
  3. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    Well thanks for the replies.... I am going to be attempting it this weekend. Last question, what size diameter bolts am I likely to need for attaching the wall mount to the wall.... Am I correct in saying that the brackets have 10mm? diameter holes in them for the wall bolts? Thats a bloody big hole!

    I went out and bought a load of bolts and 'special' plugs recently but looking at them I think the bolts are too small (5mm diameter) with a 10mm spanner type head... hmmmm although 8 of em should be more than enough to support 30kg?? :rolleyes:

    Cheers
  4. mikeq

    mikeq Guest

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    make sure the head of the bolt will not go through the hole, may need some washers.
  5. chicken balti

    chicken balti Guest

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    My house is two and a half years old. When I bought it I spoke with the builder about fixing the wall bracket for a 14" TV to a partition stud wall, non-load bearing, non-exterior and definitely no breeze block, just a cavity! I was told that heavy duty cavity fixing would do the job. I was somewhat scpetical of this as there is considerable torque on a wall bracket holding up a 14" CRT, so I went round to one of the houses that were still being built and spoke to the plasterer. He said the same thing! He told me that the walls were stronger than they looked but cavity fixings would be OK.

    I gingerly did what I had been told, after all the house was new, if I had a problem I could get the builder to sort it out. Well, after two and a half years the TV is still there. I used the same fixings for the wall bracket for a 37" Panasonic plasma in the master bedroom and the whole thing is rock solid.

    One word of caution. Plaster skimmed walls are NOT drylined walls. Skimmed walls will only ever be as good as the material behind them. Proper stud walling, delicate and brittle though it may appear, seems to be perfect for the job.
  6. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    Chicken Balti.... I would probably agree with you if the walls are battoned i.e. attached to wood battoning with screws however id be a little concerned about hanging such a lot of weight from a plasterboard that is simply 'glued' to the thermalite..... The top surface of plasterboard can be simply peeled off by hand - and I'd be a little worried of the entire board being peeled off the wall!

    Im being a little over protective and going to use 12 special plugs, and bolts.... I REALLY don't want to come home and find my plasma in pieces on the floor...

    Cheers
  7. chicken balti

    chicken balti Guest

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    Merritt,

    Your call. I agree that it just doesn't make sense but I spoke to the 'experts' and they all agreed that it was OK. I haven't had a single problem, no loose fixings and no degradation whatsoever. By the way, there is no timber battening on any of the walls holding up the plasterboard sheets, thin folded aluminium (and I mean THIN) angle was fixed to the floor and ceiling to which the plasterboard sheeting was screwed. Sounds dodgy I know but modern building methods and all that. Its not a Barratt home by the way :)
  8. harrisuk

    harrisuk Member

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    If it works fare enough. My personal opinion is that any one who attaches one of these things to a stud wall, Plaster board etc without proper consideration (Fixing to uprights, batons, metal rods and the many other suggestions made to make these things safe) has alot more bottle than I have.

    I feel better knowing mine is attached to solid victorian brick work by eight 3inch coach bolts.

    If it comes off the wall it is taking the whole lot with it !
  9. Phil_Yeoman

    Phil_Yeoman Member

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    A plasterboard and misconceptions. Plasterboard has a better strength when fixed to the wall useing the plaster dab adheasive than when using batterns (try pulling the bloody stuff off!) The adheasive penertrates the paper and bonds with the substraight. The subseqent contact area is huge compared to using screews and batterns. Typically 30% of the board area is bonded rather than less than 5% using screws.

    Like I said before though this type of fixing doesn't give you a good nights sleep.

    Phil
  10. TopMeTom

    TopMeTom New Member

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    My house was built in 1970,how on earth do you know what walls you got????:confused:
  11. jxvaug

    jxvaug Guest

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    greyt, please could you send that info to me: boro86uk@yahoo.co.uk thanks a lot i am putting a LCD 32" dell in the bedroom
  12. andrewkay

    andrewkay Guest

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    Whatever happens don't bridge the wall cavity (between the outer bricks and the blockwork) by fixing it from the outside. This could result in dampness and other issues and problems caused by this action would not be covered by your 10 year NHBC house guarantee.

    You need to fix it to the plasterboard or to the inner skin of your cavity wall. You do need the correct fixings (cavity or wall), but there are plenty of alternatives. A platerboard "spreader plate" is available for some brackets, for example the Vogel plasma brackets, and the load is spread using two horizontal plates with the bracket mounted onto the plates and the TV mounted in turn. Or you can use fixings that go through to blockwork.

    Andy
  13. Ticsmon

    Ticsmon Guest

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    I used heavy duty plasterbaord metal fixings from B&Q, the ones that fold in when you tighten the screw and they are holding my PWD8 fine, before I hung it though I swung on the wall mount to make sure it would hold. :eek:
  14. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    I have thermalite blocks and dot and dab plasterboard and I just used large screws and plugs in the thermalite after filling the holes with no more nails.

    Just drill your holes, fill em with no more nails, put your plugs in then leave it for the no more nails to harden then attach the spacer block of wood to bring it level with the wall and screw the mount to that. It took my full weight at full tilt with no movement and I'm not exactly small. :rotfl:

    I can take some pictures if you really need em cos I moved the telly now to a stand I had made for it and the wall has 2 lovely 2 by 4 battens in it, the wife is not happy. :nono:
  15. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    Ok guys - I have put my wall mount instructions back on line for a little while... They can be found here:

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/steveb.merritt/wall_mount.htm



    Edited to say...
    I would be VERY careful about attaching something this heavy to the plasterboard alone as I have heard horror stories of entire plasterboard panels coming off the adhesive dabs with the plasma still attached!



    Good luck..

    Steve
  16. kevandalice

    kevandalice Member

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    [​IMG]

    is this thermailite blocks or breeze blocks?
  17. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    If you get a small screwdriver and try to push it in to the blocks and you can't then they are not thermalite. If on the other hand, the screwdriver can be pushed in rather easily then they are thermalite.
  18. Scotty306

    Scotty306 Member

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    Thermalites are white ie. same colour as the plaster in your plasterboard, those blocks look grey.

    How tight were the screws holding that socket back box in place?
    It's only an indication, but if you can get a good fixing into red plugs with normal screws then heavier fixings should be ok too.
  19. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    The thermalite in my house isn't white - its the same colour as that shown in the picture... and its everywhere. It is however very good for noise insulation!!

    Steve
  20. av2diefor

    av2diefor Guest

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    The picture shows Thermalite blocks, Durox blocks are white.

    Both are pretty hopeless for fixing to, aim for the mortar joint, thats where the best fix is secured ;)
  21. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    Or use proper thermalite fixing plugs :D

    Steve
  22. av2diefor

    av2diefor Guest

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    The problem is the lightweight blocks have no density, they are designed for insulation.

    I remember when they were launched, i went with my father, the rep gave one to my Dad with a proprietory fixing, he said feel how strong the fixing is, he pulled it out :D

    The rep was gobsmacked, my workers and i build these walls all day long and i hate them, we cut them with a handsaw for gods sake!

    I havn't seen a fixing yet that works for these blocks, first rule of building is you cant fix strong to weak.
  23. Merritt

    Merritt Member

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    I know what you mean but you should really try the plugs I have listed on my site... they are very good. You wouldn't be able to pull one out without some serious toolage when the bolts are in place.... Give em a try, they are great for heavy duty apps

    Steve
  24. MAW

    MAW New Member

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    We have no trouble with thermalites, none at all. And the ability to cut them with a hanndsaw, or in our case a DeWalt alligator makes in wall speakers a doddle. We love them.
  25. Rahosi

    Rahosi Member

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    When drilling any holes for hanging things on walls, drill at a slight to moderate downwards angle. This is less likely to pull out the wall than a straight fixing as the fixing then tends to pull INTO the wall. This is additional help to other fixing methods.
    If you do this, you might want to consider a slightly longer fixing to achieve equal depth of fixing into the wall.

    Other points:-
    When rawplugging a hole in a 'solid' or a plasterboarded solid wall:-
    Never leave a plug flush with a tiled surface, the screw might crack the tile as the plug expands.

    Rawplugs should be driven past ANY surface (timber, tile plaster, render etc) into the building material behind. There is little pulling strength in surfaces. Allow for this when choosing the length of your screws etc. Avoid loading surfaces!

    Always put a screw into a hole to check a hole is deep enough BEFORE inserting the plug. If it isn't deep enough, when you tighten the screw, you might end up jacking the surface off the wall (breaking it!) or breaking the screw.

    If a screw is very tight withdraw it, draw the thread of the screw across a bar of soap which will lubricate / ease the fixing.
  26. cochese

    cochese Member

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    could anyone tell me what blocks is have in my wall behind the plasterboard?

    http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b72/hat_uk/IMG_3720.jpg

    i would take the light switch plate off but it's wedged in tight!

    can anyone tell me what would be the generally recommended way for me to fix my 42" panny wall bracket to the wall?
  27. SillySausage

    SillySausage Member

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    In our new house with thermalite blocks, I drilled through the plasterboard and installed 8 8mm x 120mm screwed rods with some 'glue' from screwfix made for the job.

    I can link to the stuff I used if outside links are allowed on the forum.

    Then the backplate was screwed to these and plasma duly mounted.

    If you do it properly there is no need to be worried about installing plasmas on any sort of walls.
  28. cochese

    cochese Member

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    thanks for the reply, if you can't link to the items could you tell me what the name of the rods and adhesive are please?
  29. SillySausage

    SillySausage Member

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    Mods if this is against the rules, sorry and please delete.

    The 'glue' I used is http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A236072&ts=79984&id=31582

    With 8mm rods http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=100071&ts=80284&id=18004

    You'll need to read the instructions carefully and make sure it is all set before installing.

    I used a calking gun to apply the cement.

    Please note use this at your own risk. It worked well for me and others but I cannot accept liability if your screen falls off ;)
  30. cochese

    cochese Member

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    thanks for that. stupid question but how do you screw the rods into the wall in the first place?

    don't worry, i won't come looking for you if it goes wrong :D

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