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Solutions for a muddy lawn

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by bairdyboy1980, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    My back garden is a mud bath. Its 8m by 6m of lawn. I installed a swing yesterday its a mud bath. I need to do something about this....

    Don't want to dig up to put drainage in as i just got the turf laid 8 months ago!

    Anybody had this and got a solution? Was looking at the grid rubber mats which apparently help with muddy lawns but not sure..
  2. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Not exactly convenient but not walking on it helps a lot. The turf will survive just fine unless it's trampled.
  3. Dony

    Dony Active Member

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    I doubt there's much you can do except maybe putting down a load of bark down around the play area.

    The ground is totally saturated at the moment so any traffic walking or playing on it is going to churn it up. I live down a country lane and I don't remember the grass verges being cut up as badly as they are this year.
    Thankfully my children are happy to be playing in the house and not on the swings in the garden.
  4. craig1912

    craig1912 Member

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    You probably should have put drainage in before you turfed it but other than that there is not much more you can do.
  5. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions Active Member

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    go over it all with a fork (garden not kitchen) & stab holes all over, it will help with draining, also see if you can create a run off area.
  6. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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  7. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    I also bought this, thinking it would help

    [​IMG]
  8. NewfieDrool

    NewfieDrool Active Member

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    It's been a wet old end or start to the year :)

    The more you walk on it the more damage you will do to your turf.
    What you are about to do is aerate the turf which relieves compact soil and allows drainage but that tool is no doubt a hollow core aerator and its far to wet to use it. The cores will simply not come out and all you will do is continue to walk over the turf creating more problems. NOW is not the time to be doing this with either a hollow or solid spike. You are wasting your time.

    My advice is stay off the turf if your worried about its condition.
  9. andyparksy

    andyparksy Member

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    Spent three years of effort each summer trying different things to stop it being a mud bath at the back or our house each winter and had no luck with it at all.

    I gave in a couple of weeks ago and have just astroturfed the whole lot!

    Best thing for an area under a swing, I found, was the wood bark. It did move around the garden a little but at least they could use the swing and didn't look too bad......
  10. Big Ian

    Big Ian Member

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    Wait for your lawn to dry out a little, and aireate it with a hollow tine aireator, then get your self some fine gravel (1-3mm) and "sweep this into the holes, It won`t fix the problem immediately but over a period of years it will improve the soil drainage a little.
    The Best option would be to dis drainage channels and run a land drain to a soak away. it shouldn't involve digging up the entire lawn but digging strips through it. and sinking some form of soak away in a corner.
    (gravel in a hessian sack or proprietary plastic system)
  11. gibbsy

    gibbsy Active Member

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    If you live on a slope and you have a mole problem the mole will help drain the lawn. Bastard.

    My grass area, can't really call it a lawn is on a fair old slope and when we first moved in I put in several drainage channels as I knew there was a problem with water coming down off the mountain. It's worked really well, but this winter even that drainage has been overwhelmed and the ground is fairly muddy.

    Let it dry out as much as it can and then start forking it. Hopefully we will get a better spring and summer than last year.

    As for the mole. I have plans for you.:devil:
  12. kav

    kav Well-Known Member

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    We live in an area renowned for the thick clay, and had no choice but to opt for astroturf after putting up with awful drainage in the back garden for several years.
  13. NorvernRob

    NorvernRob Active Member

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    Ours is thick clay too. I've already decked nearly a third of the garden, and will be doing another third this year. I've considered astroturf but the garden is sloped and uneven, so it would be a lot of work to install.

    There's just no point having grass when it's only usable for a couple of weeks per year.
  14. loz

    loz Active Member

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  15. kav

    kav Well-Known Member

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    I've decked about a third of our garden too, and we debated doing the rest but didn't like the way it would look.

    We had a fairly big slope on ours, but a couple of tons of sand and stone sorted it out and made it nice and level for laying the astroturf on.
  16. SBT

    SBT Active Member

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    I wouldn't use that bark stuff,the cats love it ;)
  17. Dony

    Dony Active Member

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    I've heard people say that before but I've bark down in 2 flowerbeds and the childrens play area and haven't had an issue.
  18. SBT

    SBT Active Member

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    No cat owners near you?

    Had to take mine up as the whole plot looked like a massive litter tray :thumbsdow
  19. Dony

    Dony Active Member

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    Next doors cat takes shelter under the bottom of the slide when it's raining, and sleeps there when it's sunny. Maybe it doesn't want to mess in it's own rest area.
    Still doesn't explain the flowerbeds at the front being untouched.

    Maybe having open fields directly behind my back garden means it doesn't need to come into the garden and crap all over it.
  20. SBT

    SBT Active Member

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    I have open fields right by me, but they still climb over the garden wall to crap everywhere.

    The plot with the bark was their favourite spot,now it's the lawn :thumbsdow
  21. gibbsy

    gibbsy Active Member

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    There are several cats near me, my next door neighbour has one. There is a field and a forest behind my house but they damn things still come into my garden to crap. I'm sure they do it just to wind my dog up.
  22. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    Really don't know what to do as you are right, a few weeks out of the year for a useable surface ain't good. Especially me being in Scotland!!!!


    Do you think the lawn protectors work? Or the lawn mesh you put down?
  23. Dony

    Dony Active Member

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    There is not much you can do about it. Gardens are pretty much a no go area during the winter. And besides, it's Baltic out there so best to keep the little one inside anyway.
  24. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    Nah she loves the rain and outside. She puts like 2 coats on and a puddle suit on haha

    Thinking about making putting stepping paving in, that might sort it.

    Would love to get feedback on whether this would work though:

    Grass Protection, Ground Stabilising Mesh - Type B (per 10m2) | eBay

    or

    50LG lawn protection paver protection lawn pad GRIDS | eBay

    Anyone?
  25. NewfieDrool

    NewfieDrool Active Member

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    If you place the mesh down it will just get pushed into your turf and then removing it will create more problems.
    If this has always been a fault or problem then sadly unless you want to rip it up and think about drainage and the cost associated with it I would simply leave it well alone.
    Now you have and I guess the cold snap you will damage the turf by continually walking on frozen ground.

    No doubt it will be compacted now and so use the aerator when the spring arrives but you may wish to add a sand mix based mixture if you are hollow coring to aid drainage, however if you ask me you will find issues beneath the soil layer which is why you have standing water. The only way is to see the composition of the soil layers is by taking a plug sample.

    As already mentioned a nice section or complete mr fake lawn would have been so much better and cleaner for you.
  26. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    So my lawn now is a total mud bath. I can see the only option is to put drainage in but i dont have a clue.

    Got a landscape gardener up and he said he would have to take 4-6 inches off the top and then fill with gravel and one pipe for drainage then turf over the top. He said french drains wouldnt work.

    Dread the day when he gives me a quote for it.. think it might be into the £1000's
  27. MikeP1

    MikeP1 Member

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    If it's going to cost that sort of money I would really consider artificial lawn, at least worth getting a quote to compare.

    It was the best thing we ever did and ensures my boy can play outside all yr around.
  28. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    i'm hoping it wont be that expensive. It just wouldnt surprise me!!

    He mentioned:

    Turf (£150 for 65m2)
    7 tonnes of gravel (i would guess this to be about £400)
    a mini digger (unsure of costs)
    a skip (£140 probably)
    3 days work (unsure of cost)

    fairly amounts up!

    for artifical grass, it would still need the same drainage...
  29. shodan

    shodan Active Member

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    My lawn is a mess. Lots of different grass types, lots of patches and very uneven and bumpy. The middle of it isn't bad but the first 3 meters are as dry as a bone. I aeriated (sp?) it with a garden fork a few weeks ago and now it is solid with holes in...... It also seems to be getting worse every year......

    I'm considering laying down a few bags of top soil and over seeding the area and hoping the kids keep off it for long enough ( not likely!) and the bids don't eat all the seeds..... Maybe the top soil might get some of the bumps out of it..

    About 5 years ago I took out 6 40ft + conifers that were all around the garden and blocked light everywhere. I'm sure this has had a massive effect on the lawn, but I would've thought it was go swampy, not desert-y!

    Any idea what I can do with that?
  30. bairdyboy1980

    bairdyboy1980 Active Member

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    How big is the lawn?

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